Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Who has the best voice...?


Recommended Posts

Cary Grant was a wonderful star in almost every way.  But, not in the voice department.  His voice was a bit whiny and high pitched.  I prefer the deep, resonant tones of Mason or Colman or Peck or Mitchum.

Any leading man as popular as Grant had to have a voice which was appealing to most people.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I just went through this thread and as far as I can tell, Greer Garson is a favorite of many.  I really like her voice too.

 

People were definitely groomed for radio back then, and it shows.  Could anyone imagine today's biggest stars doing radio reprises of their movies or TV shows?  Okay maybe I could picture Ray Romano doing this.

 

I noticed that under character actors nobody mentioned Walter Brennen yet.  Also I don't think I saw voice actor Paul Frees mentioned yet.

Link to post
Share on other sites

What do folks think about Marilyn Monroe's voice?

 

Is it her natural speaking voice in something like THE RIVER OF NO RETURN, or just part of the persona she crafted for herself in the 1950s at Fox? I haven't seen any of her earlier films from the 40s to compare it.

 

I did not hear her natural voice in River of No Return. I felt she was trying to make her voice sound deeper, perhaps because she felt her character warranted it (or something). It wasn't very convincing, it sounded too put on.

 

I skimmed through the posts and didn't see Howard Da Silva mentioned. He has a distinctive voice that adds character.

 

And very surprised not to see Jack Palance. A sub-category could be voices that somehow clash with what they look like. Jack would make a good start. He has rather a sweet-sounding soft voice for someone who can appear and play roles that are aggressive and menacing. That Jack can really look mean ... and then we get this voice. I don't dislike it though, Jack's cool..

 

==

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I did not hear her natural voice in River of No Return. I felt she was trying to make her voice sound deeper, perhaps because she felt her character warranted it (or something). It wasn't very convincing, it sounded too put on.

==

 

I always figured that Monroe's natural voice was closer to something like in Bus Stop minus the Southern accent.  I've read that in her last (ultimately unfinished) film, Something's Gotta Give, Marilyn opted to use her real voice in lieu of her breathy, highly articulated schtick, in a continuing effort to change her image.  It's such a shame that she ended up dying during this stage of her career.  I'd be really interested to know what the Marilyn Monroe of the 1960s & 1970s would have done movie wise. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's been quite a while since I've seen 'Niagara' and 'Don't Bother to Knock', but since she plays somewhat unlikable characters in both films, maybe they would provide a glimpse into what Marilyn Monroe's true speaking voice was.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's been quite a while since I've seen 'Niagara' and 'Don't Bother to Knock', but since she plays somewhat unlikable characters in both films, maybe they would provide a glimpse into what Marilyn Monroe's true speaking voice was.

 

It's been awhile for me too but I don't remember her as unlikable in Don't Bother to Knock. Her character was desperately confused and I felt sympathy for her, especially in the denouement when that razor blade was wrested from her. That might have been the real Marilyn, the closest role she ever did that mirrored how she might have felt in her real life (at times).

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Claude Rains

Ossie Davis

F. Murray Abraham

George Sanders

Phylicia Rashad

James Earl Jones

Paul Frees

Loretta Devine

Greer Garson

LeVar Burton

Fredric March

Ruby Dee

Rosalind Russell

Keith David

Jose Ferrer

June Foray

Robert Ito

Gregory Peck

Deborah Kerr

Vincent Price

Robert Mitchum

Charles Boyer

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, after watching Paul McCartney "performing" his "Maybe I'm Amazed" song on SNL's 40th Anniversary telecast last night, I THINK we can now safely rule out Sir Paul as owning a "best voice" anymore!

 

(...and as a big Beatles fan since the night Ed Sullivan introduced them to us Yanks back in February of '64, I gotta say this pains me to say this)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have long bemoaned the loss of the great voices amongst the acting ranks.  Chalk it up to the New Wave or the 60s/70s move toward a more "natural" approach, the bottom line is that I personally don't like it.  So, that said, here are a few of my favs..

 

Ronald Colman

Cedricke Hardwicke

James Mason

George Sanders

 

Bette Davis

Lauren Bacall

Connie Bennett

Loretta Young

 

The amazing thing is that most of the actors from the golden age had amazing voices. It's very hard

to pick one out who didn't.  Compare that with today, when almost the last thing you think of is

their voice....

 

Piltdown Man 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have long bemoaned the loss of the great voices amongst the acting ranks.  Chalk it up to the New Wave or the 60s/70s move toward a more "natural" approach, the bottom line is that I personally don't like it.  So, that said, here are a few of my favs..

 

Ronald Colman

Cedricke Hardwicke

James Mason

George Sanders

 

Bette Davis

Lauren Bacall

Connie Bennett

Loretta Young

 

The amazing thing is that most of the actors from the golden age had amazing voices. It's very hard

to pick one out who didn't.  Compare that with today, when almost the last thing you think of is

their voice....

 

Piltdown Man 

Most of the males chosen had very deep voices. Is a deep voice necessarily the most pleasing male voice?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Most of the males chosen had very deep voices. Is a deep voice necessarily the most pleasing male voice?

That's a good question. I think deep voices are usually related to people's ideas about sexy men.

 

But then there's a guy like Joe E. Brown. He had a rich, deep voice-- but I don't think people associate him with being very sexy. Do they?

Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a good question. I think deep voices are usually related to people's ideas about sexy men.

 

But then there's a guy like Joe E. Brown. He had a rich, deep voice-- but I don't think people associate him with being very sexy. Do they?

 

I'm a straight guy so I think of it more in terms of "cool factor" than anything else.  But I like Joe E. Brown for his high-spirited antics.  In all his movies, he WAS the stunt man!

 

As far those with upper vocal range being high on my "cool" scale, I think Dick Powell was one cool cat.  Also William Powell, although unrelated.  That guy could yap like an semiautomatic firearm.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with many of the classic star.names posited here. However, a few of my favorite voices seem to have been left out:

 

Joan Crawford.....sugar coating a hidden promise, sexual,.menacing,.all of the above.

Mady Astor.....sexy gurgling

Paulette Goddard.....sexy, cooing

Rita Hayworth......sexy, purring

Ruth Hussey.......no nonsense

Dolores Del Rio.......icily sexy

Don Ameche.......crisp and urbane

Helen Walker.......supressed sexualitgly

Suzanne Pleshette......huskily sexual

 

And of course, Linda Darnell. I have always liked her voice, but thought it was my general bias towards her. However, viewings on youtube of her Mystery Guest turn on What's My Line I found a revelation. Her voice in a non scripted speaking situation revealed the fluidity and melodic qualities, as well as range, of her regular voice. And the comments posted to this clip (which must've gotten heated or off topic since they got deleted at some point) attest to this; many posters, unfamiliar or little familiar with her commented favorably on her voice, often bemoaning the lack of same among current stars compared to those of the golden age.

 

As with several others here mentioned, Linda's voice got deeper over the years; by the late 50s, she was referring to this as her "whiskey voice". I believe it was a combinatiin of smoking and drinking that led to this, at least she alluded to the latter in the way she referred to it.

 

Two more voices I love, both for their timbre and mangling of the language, are those of Carmen Miranda and Alice Brady.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a straight guy so I think of it more in terms of "cool factor" than anything else.  But I like Joe E. Brown for his high-spirited antics.  In all his movies, he WAS the stunt man!

 

As far those with upper vocal range being high on my "cool" scale, I think Dick Powell was one cool cat.  Also William Powell, although unrelated.  That guy could yap like an semiautomatic firearm.

I am always slightly put off when someone has to tell us their sexual orientation. I don't find it relevant to any film discussions. 

 

I agree that Joe E. Brown did a lot of his stunts when he was younger in Hollywood. 

 

Re: Powell's range-- are we talking about his singing or his speaking voice?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Have just gone back through this entire thread to see if the following name has ever been mentioned, but I could not find it anywhere. In fact, it was our friend Arturo here in particular who I'm somewhat surprised hasn't mentioned the actor's name of whom that I'm now thinking, and who's rich tones and precise manner of diction and mixed with a slight accent from south of the border would make his voice not only a very distinctive one but also one that is easily and instantly recognizable as his own....

 

 

(...btw...I love this old Letterman Show clip with Mr. Montalban here...)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Have just gone back through this entire thread to see if the following name has ever been mentioned, but I could not find it anywhere. In fact, it was Arturo here in particular who I'm somewhat surprised hasn't mentioned the actor's name of whom that I'm now thinking, and who's rich tones and precise manner of diction and mixed with a slight accent from south of the border would make his voice not only a very distinctive one but also one that is easily and instantly recognizable as his own....

 

 

(...btw...I love this old Letterman Show clip with Mr. Montalban here...)

Dargo, while in general I like Montalban's voice, back in my younger and more radical.days I had an issue with him and the way he pronounced a certain automobile he was hawking. I guess it illustrates the saying in Spanish, translated as."For money, the dog will.dance".

Link to post
Share on other sites

Dargo, while in general I like Montalban's voice, back in my younger and more radical.days I had an issue with him and the way he pronounced a certain automobile he was hawking. I guess it illustrates the saying in Spanish, translated as."For money, the dog will.dance".

 

I know EXACTLY of what you're sayin' here, Arturo. I used to work with a lady who's name was Jeanette CORdoba, and of course she always hated that Ricardo pronounced the name of that old Chrysler model as "CorDOba"!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I know EXACTLY of what you're sayin' here, Arturo. I used to work with a lady who's name was Jeanette CORdoba, and of course she always hated that Ricardo pronounced the name of that old Chrysler model as "CorDOba"!

Yes, that's it.exactly. It bothered me enough that I stopped.watching.Fantasy Island (although not the classic movies he was in).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, that's it.exactly. It bothered me enough that I stopped.watching.Fantasy Island (although not the classic movies he was in).

 

On SCTV's take of 'Fantasy Island', I remember Tattoo saying "I know what your fantasy is, Boss - you like to be bound up in rich Corinthian leather, ay Boss."

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...