Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Old Time Radio


Richard Kimble

Recommended Posts

"Leiningen Versus The Ants", a 1937 short story by Carl Stephenson, was the basis for the 1954 film The Naked Jungle. It was also adapted several times for radio.

 

This version stars William Conrad and was presented on Escape, January 17, 1948:

 

 

While "Leiningen Versus The Ants" is corny today (a deer being attacked by ants?), ESCAPE has always been my personal favorite OTR series... perhaps because it was among those shows that got me hooked as a kid listening to AM re-broadcasts in the 1970s. Many episodes are exceptionally well done... "The Fourth Man", "Letter For Jason", "Two Came Back", "Incident at Quito", "The Derelict" and "The Abominable Snowman", also perhaps the definitive versions (in my opinion) of repeated-among-different-shows "The Most Dangerous Game", "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge", "The Vanishing Lady", "Mars Is Heaven", "The Man Who Liked Dickens" (which works better in an edited down format than SUSPENSE's version), "Zero Hour" and "The Birds". I used to like "Three Skeleton Key", but it does show its age, while others like "Evening Primrose" are an acquired taste that you have to be in the proper mood for. Nonetheless, this really was an incredible art form that enjoyed its zenith just as TV started to replace radio.

 

https://archive.org/details/OTRR_Escape_Singles

 

I have listened to all of the ESCAPE shows of '47-54 and maybe roughly two-thirds of its star-studded sister show on CBS radio, SUSPENSE, which ran an incredible two decades ('42-62). The entire runs of JACK BENNY PROGRAM (any episode from the mid thirties through fifties), X MINUS ONE, THE WHISTLER, BURNS & ALLEN, QUIET PLEASE, CRIME CLASSICS and individual episodes of other great series (I tend to be more nit-picky with others) are close behind among my favorites.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Time has passed since my prior post. Now I just listen to old shows on my cell phone. On the app I use there's at least 20 different stations playing different shows. I just go to a show I like. And unlike sirius, they're all free !

 

I normally listen in bed before I go to sleep. It seems the nighttime is the best mood for those shows.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Time has passed since my prior post. Now I just listen to old shows on my cell phone. On the app I use there's at least 20 different stations playing different shows. I just go to a show I like. And unlike sirius, they're all free !

 

I normally listen in bed before I go to sleep. It seems the nighttime is the best mood for those shows.

I'm watching the WML? reruns with Fred Allen as a panelist. I don't find him to be very funny. There was no bigger star in radio, other than maybe Jack Benny.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm watching the WML? reruns with Fred Allen as a panelist. I don't find him to be very funny. There was no bigger star in radio, other than maybe Jack Benny.

Well he and Benny's style of humor was such that they gave all the best line to the other actors while stood there dumbfounded. The only way I guess Allen could do that on WML was to make himself dumb or not understanding what's going on. 

 

They had the best "pretend" rivalry on radio. They made fun of each other, appeared on each other's shows. Of course the guest would always "win". It was all in fun. I was said that they actually plotted some of it out ahead of time.

 

I find it fascinating watching a radio star adjusting to t.v.. Simlar to how silent stars adjusted to sound.

Link to post
Share on other sites

While "Leiningen Versus The Ants" is corny today (a deer being attacked by ants?), ESCAPE has always been my personal favorite OTR series... perhaps because it was among those shows that got me hooked as a kid listening to AM re-broadcasts in the 1970s. Many episodes are exceptionally well done... "The Fourth Man", "Letter For Jason", "Two Came Back", "Incident at Quito", "The Derelict" and "The Abominable Snowman", also perhaps the definitive versions (in my opinion) of repeated-among-different-shows "The Most Dangerous Game", "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge", "The Vanishing Lady", "Mars Is Heaven", "The Man Who Liked Dickens" (which works better in an edited down format than SUSPENSE's version), "Zero Hour" and "The Birds". I used to like "Three Skeleton Key", but it does show its age, while others like "Evening Primrose" are an acquired taste that you have to be in the proper mood for. Nonetheless, this really was an incredible art form that enjoyed its zenith just as TV started to replace radio.

 

https://archive.org/details/OTRR_Escape_Singles

 

I'm a big fan of Escape too. I consider it one of the great lost (as in unjustly ignored) treasures of radio drama, along with and Dimension X/X Minus One and Gerald Mohr's Philip Marlowe.

 

I really like "Three Skeleton Key". I'm surprised it was never filmed -- it shares the same basic idea of "Leiningen", just a different pest.

 

The problem with "Evening Primrose", aside from its obscure title, is that Rod Serling pretty much ripped it off for a Twilight Zone episode, allowing you guess the ending from almost the beginning.

 

Anyone ever seen Sondheim's musical version of "Evening Primrose", starring... Anthony Perkins?!

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well he and Benny's style of humor was such that they gave all the best line to the other actors while stood there dumbfounded. The only way I guess Allen could do that on WML was to make himself dumb or not understanding what's going on. 

 

They had the best "pretend" rivalry on radio. They made fun of each other, appeared on each other's shows. Of course the guest would always "win". It was all in fun. I was said that they actually plotted some of it out ahead of time.

 

I find it fascinating watching a radio star adjusting to t.v.. Simlar to how silent stars adjusted to sound.

Compared to Cerf, Kilgallen, and Francis, he was very slow on the uptick. Also, he apparently never felt as comfortable on TV as he did on radio. And he had the ideal face for radio.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 months later...

Fra--

 

I have never seen Fred Allen on What's My Line. Where did you see it?

 

On Buzzr http://buzzrplay.com/ they play it along with To Tell the Truth and I've Got a Secret at night starting at 11pm. What's My Line begins at 11:40. They play the old commercials along with the new ones so each episode is 40 mins.

Link to post
Share on other sites

On my radio, I have trouble pulling in the Philly AM stations.

via your computer, (Or use Tunein app on your phone) you should be able to listen to most stations nationwide....

Can't remember which Chicago station (perhaps 2 of them?) plays old radio shows on the weekend, but he banter between the hosts, commercialism, and newsbreaks drag shows on forever! They do play interesting shows, like Suspense (2 really good ones from Hope and Jimmy Stewart) and they also dug up a Bogie and Bacall radio show I never , ever heard of before, Bold Venture... https://archive.org/details/BoldVenture57Episodes

 

Anyway, I find out the show's title (or put in Bob Hope, Suspense) and listen to it without the show taking most of an hour on the radio...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Fra--

 

I have never seen Fred Allen on What's My Line. Where did you see it?

 

Yeah, Buzzzzr (whatever).  Several episodes of it for a time.  Thing is, I used to watch that show all the time while growing up, and never remembered him being on it.  Probably was too young when he was to know who he was and it didn't register at the time.

 

OLD TIME RADIO....I used to muse at the possibility of there being some old curmudgeons complaining about it.  Like:  "When I was a kid, we used to sit around the parlor reading BOOKS!  We KNEW how to use our imaginations then."  Or..."These darned kids sit around all night listenin' to that contraption.  They'll damage their EARS if they keep it up!"  and...."Nothin' but TRASH on that thing.  Give me a POLICE GAZETTE anyday!"    :D

 

 

Sepiatone

Link to post
Share on other sites

3Gqz0Gn.jpg

 

 

9uJaFjH.jpg

I too grew up laying on the floor listening to our radio and my mother always listened to Arthur Godfrey and Don McNeil's Breakfast Club while she ironed or did house work.  Two real vivid memories for me are listening on Sunday morning with the Detroit Free Press comics laid out on the floor and there was a program from Detroit where the comics were read to you by the announcer and your could read along without your parents help.  Those were the days of politically incorrect cartoons like Lil Abner and the Katzenjamer Kids which would rouse howls of protest today.  Also I remember Steve Canyon who was in the Air Force like my father.  

 

Another radio memory was when the floor radio was moved to the basement playroom when TV took over and it seemed everytime we were in the basement under my brother's train table waiting for the tornado warnings to end we were listening to Boston ****.  So I fondly remember Old Time Radio. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, Buzzzzr (whatever).  Several episodes of it for a time.  Thing is, I used to watch that show all the time while growing up, and never remembered him being on it.  Probably was too young when he was to know who he was and it didn't register at the time.

 

OLD TIME RADIO....I used to muse at the possibility of there being some old curmudgeons complaining about it.  Like:  "When I was a kid, we used to sit around the parlor reading BOOKS!  We KNEW how to use our imaginations then."  Or..."These darned kids sit around all night listenin' to that contraption.  They'll damage their EARS if they keep it up!"  and...."Nothin' but TRASH on that thing.  Give me a POLICE GAZETTE anyday!"    :D

 

 

Sepiatone

Y read when U can watch a movie.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 months later...

Heh!  ARCHIE used to be my favorite COMIC BOOKS.  I'd buy one everytime a new one came out.

 

Thanks for posting that info.  I currently got into the habit of watching old McHALE'S NAVY reruns on ANTENNATV, and wondered what BOB HASTINGS did before becoming LT. CARPENTER on the show.  I did notice him years later in the cast of one of the soap operas my wife watched.  I think it was GENERAL HOSPITAL.

 

Sepiatone

Link to post
Share on other sites

Heh!  ARCHIE used to be my favorite COMIC BOOKS.  I'd buy one everytime a new one came out.

 

Thanks for posting that info.  I currently got into the habit of watching old McHALE'S NAVY reruns on ANTENNATV, and wondered what BOB HASTINGS did before becoming LT. CARPENTER on the show.  I did notice him years later in the cast of one of the soap operas my wife watched.  I think it was GENERAL HOSPITAL.

 

Sepiatone

 

I've also been watching McHale recently, for what is essentially the first time since I was a wee tot. Aside from showing me what a brilliant farceur Joe Flynn was, it also inspired me to research Bob Hastings, and I found that Archie stuff. I believe BH also appeared on X Minus One, IIRC. He also cut an album:

 

2p4txUi.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have one of those Pyle vintage-looking record players that plays basically everything, and I recently found the Dick Tracy radio program on cassette tapes. I've always been fascinated with history, so finding this program was really special for me. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

(Posted this in the "Lost Glass Menagerie" thread, and am posting it here as well for convenience.)

 

Radio versions:

 

1. Theatre Guild on the Air in 1951 starring Helen Hayes as Amanda with Montgomery Clift as Tom, Kathryn Baird as Laura, and Karl Malden as Jim.

 

 

2.Jane Wyman recreated her film role of Laura for a 1954 adaptation on Lux Radio Theatre with Fay Bainter as Amanda, Frank Lovejoy as Tom and Tom Brown as Jim

 

https://archive.org/download/OTRR_Lux_Radio_Theater_Singles/Lux_Radio_Theatre_54-03-08_871_The_Glass_Menagerie.mp3

 

3. In 1964 Caedmon Records produced an LP version of the Glass Menagerie as the initial issue of its theatre series. The production starred Jessica Tandy as Amanda, Montgomery Clift as Tom, Julie Harris as Laura, David Wayne as the gentleman caller.

 

 

There was another version produced in 1953 for the radio series Best Plays, starring Evelyn Varden as Amanda and Geraldine Page as Laura, but this is not known to survive.

Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the scariest things you'll ever hear:

 

The Mysterious Traveler - "Behind The Locked Door" (1951)

Thanks for the link RK...just listened to it.It is a good ep.Never heard of The Mysterious Traveler radio show but googled it,found it w/o trouble.Mighta known i would find it at IA....lolol

 

Bin a fan of radio shows like this since the days when i listened to the CBS Radio Mystery Theater in the '70's.Caught every ep i could.

Since those days i've hardly ever met anyone that listens to these radio shows.But i like 'em!!

 

Never saw this thread before...never considered anybody 'round here likes this form of entertainment...doesn't seem like many ppl do.

I listen to 'em often...sometimes when i cook/eat supper,and catch a coupla eps almost every night before going to bed....they're Always better at night.

 

My favorite radio shows are 

1.The CBS Radio Mystery Theater

2.The Whistler

3.Suspense

4.Escape

Might have to add The Mysterious Traveler to the list too.  :P

 

The CBC had a radio show in the early '80'..heard a few eps but not many.The ones i heard were good(spooky).

Dunno what ever happened to it.

Pub-D-Hub,a Roku channel,has a pile of old radio shows...probably 30 or more...i didn't count.

They seem to cover every genre there is.

Never listened to most of them...i should check more of them 'em out.

Link to post
Share on other sites

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theatre-Five

 

Theatre-Five was a radio drama series, presented by ABC, between 1964 and 1965. The series used an anthology format, presented a number of short (20-minute) radio plays, across a number of genres, a number of which reflected topical issues contemporary with its airing. Writers for the show varied, as did actors, although a principal cast included George O. Petrie, Brett Morrison, Jackson Beck, Robert Dryden, Elliott Reid, Court Benson, Cliff Carpenter, and Bryna Raeburn.

 

The show's 1965 run featured several well-known actors, including an early role for James Earl Jones (Incident on US 1), a pre-M*A*S*H Alan Alda (A Bad Day's Work), and Ed Begley (The Pigeon) three years after his Academy Award win.

 

Elaine May, the most talented performer of the Nichols & May team, gives a tour-de-force performance in this Theatre Five episode, reminiscent of Agnes Moorhead in Sorry Wrong Number.

 

"Mama's Grl"

 

(June 1, 1965)

 

http://www.oldtimeradiodownloads.com/drama/theater-five/mamas-girl-1965-06-01

 

Elaine May

 

2cXsZFp.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

James Cagney is superb in this 1940 adaptation of Dalton Trumbo's novel Johnny Got His Gun. Note that after Cagney's brilliant performance, mostly a monologue, the announcer plugs his jingoistic flagwaver The Fighting 69th.

 

http://www.oldtimeradiodownloads.com/thriller/arch-obolers-plays/johnny-got-his-gun-1940-03-09

 

One of my favorite pieces of movie trivia: in late 1941 Paramount was preparing a film version of JGHG, to star William Holden with Mitchell Leisen as director. But after December 7 the project was quickly cancelled.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...