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Errol Flynn's Daughter To Appear on TCM- December 9th


TomJH
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TCM will be having mini Errol Flynn tribute on Tuesday, December 9th to be hosted by Flynn's daughter, Rory. Over the years Rory has been a huge promoter of her father's legacy, having travelled back to his hometown in Tasmania on the 100th anniversary of his birth in 2009.

 

Rory has also written a book about her Dad, The Baron of Mulholland: A Daughter Remembers Errol Flynn. I'm sure that she will have some interesting anecdotes about a man who was the incarnation of the glamour and bad boy wildness of Hollywood during its Golden Age.

 

But I'm sure that Rory will also try to show us the other Flynn, the quiet, contemplative side of which the public knew so little. He was a father who was missing from home a lot of the time but always loved his children. Away from the nightclubs, schooners and court dates that got so much publicity, he was a man who loved to read literature and poetry, collect art (including Gaugain and Van Gogh) and listen to classical music and jazz. Flynn needed his time of isolation from others so that he could write. This was particularly the case in his early Hollywood years before the distractions and easily accessible vices of Hollywood became too much of a preoccupation for him.

 

In his heart of hearts Flynn wanted to be a writer perhaps more than anything, leaving behind three books, Beam Ends, Showdown and the legendary My Wicked Wicked Ways, still on sale today over a half century after his death.

 

The Flynn films to be shown December 9th (all times are Eastern Standard):

 

8pm OBJECTIVE BURMA, one of Flynn's favourites and a source of great controversy with the British press at the time of its release

 

10:30pm ADVENTURES OF ROBIN HOOD, the film for which EF remains best remembered

 

12:30 am GENTLEMAN JIM, Flynn's favourite film of his career

 

2:30am ROCKY MOUNTAIN, the actor's last western

 

4am NEVER SAY GOODBYE, a romantic comedy set at Christmas, with Flynn dressing up as Santa Claus at one point.

 

72fd2b29-9978-418b-a4b1-48ca096c92f2_zps

 

Rory visiting her father's most famous leading lady

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Posted like a true fan!  You've even included the superflouous "U" in the word "Favorite"  and spelled it "favourite"!

 

But no matter.  Most of us feel Flynn was underappreciated as an actor, and many like his movies without thinking how good or bad the acting might be.  There ARE those who simply enjoy movies, without the need to feel they have to intellectualize their enjoyment.  You know, it's like that old song:  "I don't know why I love you like I do----I don't know why, I just DO!"

 

And some of us, for any level of reasons, just like Flynn.  Like, I enjoy Flynn in his westerns even though he's clearly miscast in them.  He always looked as if he was someone who showed up at a masquerade ball as a cowboy!  And  someone said, "Let's shoot a movie!"

 

 

Sepiatone

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You bet I'm a Flynn fan, Sepiatone. Never pretended otherwise on these boards. And I spelled favourite the way that I just did again because I'm a CANADIAN Flynn fan.

 

Flynn said that he was miscast in westerns long before anyone else ever did, and in his first couple of horse operas he did appear to be a bit of a Anglo dude out west (not that there weren't plenty of those in the real west, no matter what the movies may tell us).

 

By the time that he played Custer in They Died With Their Boots on, though, I feel that Flynn was perfectly cast in this romanticized portrait of the flamboyant buckskinned hero of the plains. Have any casting suggestions as to who would have been better? Flynn had the distinction, too, of being the only non-American born actor accepted as a western hero (to huge box office success) by U.S. audiences during his time.

 

By the time of his last western, 1950's Rocky Mountain, the one western being shown on December 9th, the actor's hard living lifestyle was clearly etching itself in his face. But his more hard bitten features brings an additional western credibility to his portrayal. Flynn is no Hollywood glamour boy in this film nor does he fall back on the well known charm of his personality here either.

 

I think that the actor's more hard edged performance in Rocky Mountain shows that, with the development of suitable properties, the Flynn of the early '50s might have been a more than credible presence in some of the crime dramas and film noirs that were popular at the time.

 

3e007387-1380-4a2c-a79b-29a2296f5617_zps

 

Flynn in Rocky Mountain, a more rugged looking Flynn giving an effectively understated performance not relying upon his well known charm.

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Posted like a true fan!  You've even included the superflouous "U" in the word "Favorite"  and spelled it "favourite"!

 

But no matter.  Most of us feel Flynn was underappreciated as an actor, and many like his movies without thinking how good or bad the acting might be.  There ARE those who simply enjoy movies, without the need to feel they have to intellectualize their enjoyment.  You know, it's like that old song:  "I don't know why I love you like I do----I don't know why, I just DO!"

 

And some of us, for any level of reasons, just like Flynn.  Like, I enjoy Flynn in his westerns even though he's clearly miscast in them.  He always looked as if he was someone who showed up at a masquerade ball as a cowboy!  And  someone said, "Let's shoot a movie!"

 

 

Sepiatone

Did Errol Flynn ever meet John Wayne? they woulda made some team. :)

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It's no secret here of my love for Errol Flynn.  No matter how many times I've seen his films, they never get old.  I have all the films that are part of the mini-marathon; but I'll probably try to watch all that I can.  I'm glad that TCM is showcasing his work.  I agree with Sepiatone that Flynn is under-appreciated as an actor.  I think he was underappreciated because 1) the most obvious, his looks.  His amazing good looks helped him and hurt him.  I believe he initially got Captain Blood, because of his good looks and athleticism; and 2) The types of films that Flynn found success in were not typically Oscar-fare.  Swashbucklers, adventure films and westerns aren't usually viewed as serious films.  

 

Even other actors admitted that they underestimated him.  Bette Davis, Flynn's co star in The Sisters and The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex, admitted that while she thought he was gorgeous, she didn't think anything of his acting ability.  While I don't think they had too much drama on The Sisters, they really butted heads on 'Elizabeth and Essex.' She wanted Laurence Olivier as her co-star; but at the time, Warners didn't think he was a big enough name.  Davis resented Flynn's presence in the film because she didn't think he was serious enough for the part.  Fast forward some forty years, long after Flynn had passed away, Davis watched the film with her friend (and 'Elizabeth and Essex' costar and frequent Flynn co-star), Olivia de Havilland and admitted that Flynn was actually really good. 

 

I've read Flynn's autobiography (one of the best celebrity autobiographies ever, btw) My Wicked, Wicked Ways, and he said himself that he didn't know why he was cast in Westerns.  I'll admit that it seems weird to have a foreign actor in the most American of genres; but I thought he was excellent in these roles.  Usually, there would be some dialogue in the film to explain Flynn's accent and from then on, it didn't matter.  In Dodge City, Flynn was Irish.  In Montana, he was actually Australian.  In his Civil War themed films, like Virginia City and They Died With Their Boots On, I guess we just have to suspend our disbelief.  In his contemporary films, he was usually cast as an upper class character, which could somewhat explain his accent, or perhaps we'll just pretend that he is an expatriate from Europe or Australia.  I have found it amusing that his accent is pretty much interchangeable with whatever nationality.  I think he's been: American, French, Canadian, Australian, Irish and Norwegian. 

 

I've found that no matter how weak the actual film is, it's always worth watching for Errol Flynn-- if even Errol can't save it, THEN you know the film is a stinker.

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I've found that no matter how weak the actual film is, it's always worth watching for Errol Flynn-- if even Errol can't save it, THEN you know the film is a stinker.


 


How true.


I actually say the same thing about Judy Garland. Sometimes, talent is larger than the vehicle.


 


Amazing Flynn's charm, personality & talent transcend time....I think there will always be new generations "discovering" Errol Flynn's movies and therefore he lives on. I do think his writing is even better than his acting....but his acting has the bonus of his FACE.


 


And forgive me..... I've mentioned before that I saw his costume from ROBIN HOOD on exhibit and you can see how tall and perfectly proportioned he was. He must have been breathtaking in person!

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`About one of my  fave Jack Warner said of Errol Flynn
 
`'To the Walter Mitty of the world he was all the heroes in one magnificent ,sexy, animal package' Despite their constant fights Warner respected him in a way but he gave him westerns like Silver River, in the late forties Warner saw the decline in his health and looks  and wanted more  than less to break his contract.he did not see his potential as a character actor,Warner was not a great judge of real talent,Flynn was cultured,well read,a great athlete, he was good at any sport and a corrosive sense of humour.
 
 

 

Some of the minor post-WW2 films that were miscasting ventures for Flynn were Cry Wolf and Escape Me Never.

 

After Adventures of Don Juan (a tremendous often tongue-in-cheek adventure with a wonderful performance by its star) failed to register as strongly as Warner had hoped at the box office he lost interest in Flynn's career and proceeded to give him a number of lesser properties (Montana, Rocky Mountain, the latter a film I rather like, Mara Maru).

 

As for Silver River, to which you made reference, nakano, I think that the actor's final collaboration with Raoul Walsh is a considerably underrated western about a power hungry louse, with Flynn delivering one of his very best performances in this somewhat off beat casting.

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Just curious if anyone feels 'in-between' about Errol Flynn. What I've discovered is there are those who really love him and those who really don't like him at all. Sometimes I don't care for him, but I try to find a middle point and balance my appreciation for his unique place in Hollywood history with the many things where he falls shorts (for me).

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How true.

I actually say the same thing about Judy Garland. Sometimes, talent is larger than the vehicle.

 

Amazing Flynn's charm, personality & talent transcend time....I think there will always be new generations "discovering" Errol Flynn's movies and therefore he lives on. I do think his writing is even better than his acting....but his acting has the bonus of his FACE.

 

And forgive me..... I've mentioned before that I saw his costume from ROBIN HOOD on exhibit and you can see how tall and perfectly proportioned he was. He must have been breathtaking in person!

 

I agree 110%.  I watch The Adventures of Robin Hood whenever it is on...there is always something new to concentrate on...costumes, colour, scenery; as well as the magnificent interplay between Basil Rathbone, Errol and Claude Raines.  I do wish they (any two of the three actors) had been in more films.  I think Warner Bros. overlooked the chemistry (or explosions as the case may be) between the three that would have made for interesting roles in films.

 

Besides the sword fights are great choreography, in some instances better than some of the stuff Gene did as a "pirate".

 

Additionally I think Errol would have been a potent actor in the film noir genre, there is never a more menacing villain that one with an English accent.  If directors had been able to look beyond his swashbuckler roles they would have been able to see that there is nothing more deadly than film noir set in post war England.  Just recall Brighton Beach.   

 

As for "o" versus "ou" it all depends on where and how you were taught to spell.  More of the "posters" here need to read the Economist. 

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I like Silver River like almost everything Errol Flynn did, but he did not like it as he was not happy  of having to do a western again,the only thing he really liked about the movie was to play for his lifelong  friend  Raoul Walsh and to resume is dalliance with Ann Sheridan , a relationship started   around 1939,actually he was a bit responaible for her short lived marriage -9 months- with George Brent who surprised them together... resulting in a severe fight,Flynn knocked out Brent,Flynn used to do boxing in Australia..

It's my understanding that Flynn was initially pleased with the Silver River screenplay, probably because it was not going to be one of his standard heroic roles. There were problems with his drinking during the production, however (as well as Ann Sheridan hitting the sauce, as well). And, no, it was not a happy production., In fact, Raoul Walsh didn't even make reference to the film in his autobiography.

 

Flynn and Ann Sheridan remained lifelong friends after their brief dalliance (possibly during the promotional period of Dodge City). Whether they "dallied" again later, I have no idea. But they did get along great as drinking buddies during the production of Silver River. A little too much so.

 

In spite of all that, however, I think, for the most part (acknowledging some screenplay issues, including a noticeably weak final fifteen minutes), Silver River plays quite well, I feel. Flynn, while playing a self centred business buccaneer who is decidedly NOT a nice guy, brings a physical elegance to his role. And, in the latter parts of the film, when the chips are finally down for his character, Flynn makes him admirable by taking it stoically and not whimpering about his downfall. The film also has a solid supporting cast, highlighted, I feel, by Sheridan and a flamboyant Thomas Mitchell.

 

As for that business about Flynn having a physical altercation with George Brent, I suspect that is a myth created by a particularly notorious sensation-seeking biographer (Higham). In fact, when the author of a Brent biography was on these boards recently I specifically asked him about that alleged "incident." He replied that he had found no evidence of it. I am highly dubious that Brent ever "discovered" Errol with his wife. It just makes for a colourful read (a Higham specialty in distorting the facts).

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Dec. 9 -- Finals week for this college instructor with no DV-R.  TCM must have a cruel streak.

 

I'm an unrepentant Flynn lover and envious of the poster who saw the Robin Hood costume on exhibit.   I know his personal life was full of transgressions, yet all it takes is one close up and a couple of lines in that lilting English accent, and I can forgive anything.

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Dec. 9 -- Finals week for this college instructor with no DV-R.  TCM must have a cruel streak.

 

I'm an unrepentant Flynn lover and envious of the poster who saw the Robin Hood costume on exhibit.   I know his personal life was full of transgressions, yet all it takes is one close up and a couple of lines in that lilting English accent, and I can forgive anything.

I have all the movies that are part of the marathon, though I'll probably watch anyway ;-) Can't get enough of that man.

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Can't get enough of that man.

 

My love for Flynn is a teeny sore subject for MrTiki....well I DO have that picture (speedracer's avatar) framed at my desk and shirtless Flynn as my desktop pic.

 

Last night seeing the preview for OBJECTIVE BURMA I said, "recognize that guy?" and he didn't! I said that's Errol Flynn! And he got a sense Flynn was actually a good actor-not just a pretty face! (although still gorgeous to me behind that smudged mud)

 

I like mature Flynn as a war hero, cowboy and urban gentleman just as much as a "fantasy" figure. But young Flynn acting as a pirate or bow hunter in costume is such delicious fantasy-all the women want him-all the men want to BE like him-it's great to have Flynn on film for the ages!

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Can't get enough of that man.

 

My love for Flynn is a teeny sore subject for MrTiki....well I DO have that picture (speedracer's avatar) framed at my desk and shirtless Flynn as my desktop pic.

 

Last night seeing the preview for OBJECTIVE BURMA I said, "recognize that guy?" and he didn't! I said that's Errol Flynn! And he got a sense Flynn was actually a good actor-not just a pretty face! (although still gorgeous to me behind that smudged mud)

 

I like mature Flynn as a war hero, cowboy and urban gentleman just as much as a "fantasy" figure. But young Flynn acting as a pirate or bow hunter in costume is such delicious fantasy-all the women want him-all the men want to BE like him-it's great to have Flynn on film for the ages!

I agree that Flynn is good young and older.  Before I saw Against All Flags from '52 I was worried that he was going to look awful, because all I've read is that he pretty much aged rapidly starting in the late 40s through the end of his life.  He still looked pretty darn good in The Adventures of Don Juan and didn't look that bad in Against All Flags.  Even though he did look a little older, he didn't look bad.  I wouldn't expect him to look the same in 1935's Captain Blood as he did in 1952's Against All Flags-- it was 17 years later after all.

 

Aside from the young Errol that we all know and love, I think he looks especially good in 1944's Uncertain Glory.  He even rocked the 5 o'clock shadow well. 

 

He was a very underrated talent-- very versatile in a variety of genres.

 

I have a shirtless Flynn as my desktop pic too!! Which one do you have? This is mine.  ::Sigh:: it never gets old to look at.

 

Your-Morning-Shot-Errol-Flynn-635.jpg

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Nice candid!

 

Here's the one I have:

 

Annex%20-%20Flynn,%20Errol%20(Captain%20

 

Sorry about the size....It's from Dr Macro's High Quality Movie Scans- a perfect place to find great photos you can d/l and actually PRINT hard copies from! I have several 8x10s from DrMacro framed and in albums.

 

http://www.doctormacro.com/Movie%20Star%20Pages/Flynn,%20Errol-Annex.htm

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There was a thread here several months ago about Errol Flynn's Oscar nomination for 1957's The Sun Also Rises mysteriously disappearing after it was initially announced. Five other actors were then in contention for the AA that year.

 

http://forums.tcm.com/index.php?/topic/49371-errol-flynns-lost-oscar-nomination/page-3?hl=+errol

 

There is, to the best of my knowledge, no real information around about the peculiar circumstances surrounding that event.

 

It would be wonderful if Oscar historian Robert Osborne (assuming he's co-host December 9th) asked Rory Flynn what she may have heard about her father's lost Oscar nom.

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This is a reminder that Rory Flynn will be hosting five films of her father's, starting at 8pm (EST) tonight.

 

The films:

 

8pm Objective Burma (1945)

10:30pm Adventures of Robin Hood (1938)

12:30am Gentleman Jim (1942)

2:30am Rocky Mountain (1950)

4am Never Say Goodbye (1946)

 

IMG_3115-276x3001_zpsa5eca7b4.jpg

 

One note: For those who have never seen it and can't stay up late, you might consider recording Gentleman Jim. It's one of the best films of the actor's career (Flynn's personal favourite, in fact), and a film that deserves to be better known.

 

 

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Looks like I'm going to miss out on part of tonight's Errol Flynn marathon.  1) Because the first film started at 5 and I'm still at work and 2) I'm going to go play Trivia with a friend. 

 

I have all the movies that TCM is showing... looks like I just might have to re-create this marathon for myself later.  I did the same thing back in June during the Errol pirate movie marathon.  I ended up going to Happy Hour instead.

 

I'd be interested in reading Rory Flynn's book that she wrote about her father.  I feel like her book would contain more factual information since she did know the man (even if not for very long) and would have access to his personal papers and items and such. 

 

I second the recommedation for Gentleman Jim, excellent film.  Errol did his own boxing.  I read that they may have had a footwork double when they show closeups of his feet moving around the ring.  Alan Hale is hilarious as Errol's father and I loved William Frawley as his agent. 

 

Never Say Goodbye, while definitely not groundbreaking cinema, is a cute Christmas movie and Flynn and Eleanor Parker made a very attractive couple.  Normally I'm not a fan of child actors, but I thought the girl who played their daughter was funny.  SZ Sakall is also hilarious too.  Forrest Tucker, whom I had heard of and knew he was in F-Troop, is so tall.  I didn't realize it until I saw this movie.  He makes our boy Flynn look scrawny and short, which we know wasn't the case. 

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I'm enjoying these Bob/Rory lead-ins to her father's films this evening. I've found some of her childhood recollections quite interesting.

 

(...and thanks Tom for your heads-up about this...I might have missed this otherwise)

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Rory Flynn on TCM last evening:

 

"What I need now is to make sure that my father's name is remembered and rejoiced. He did make millions of people happy.

 

I know he's been the black sheep in Hollywood. I know that he hasn't been recognized by his peers. They sort of brush aside the fact that he became a very good actor. And you can see this in The Forstye Woman, Kim and the Barrymore movie (Too Much Too Soon).

 

Hopefully one day they will honour him and that's the day I look forward to. Hopefully my son will be there to also enjoy it."

 

It was really nice to see Rory (as well as TCM) paying homage to her father last night on the channel. Her memories of her father are understandably limited (she was 12 when he died) but she did speak of him as a very romantic man, who, on one of her mother's birthdays, filled their pool with gardenias, an aroma that filled their home for three memorable days afterwards.

 

When asked by Robert to select the film that she thinks best sums up Errol Flynn, his daughter picked They Died With Their Boots On, saying that the Custer role captured many aspects of her father, his brashness, romantic nature and leadership capabilities. (She omitted the fact that the early portions of the film provided him with an excellent opportunity to demonstrate his impressive ability with light hearted humour, as well).

 

About Rocky Mountain, a little remembered western that Flynn made in 1950, Rory contrasted his performance as a rugged westerner in it to some of the earlier, more flamboyant portrayals in his previous westerns. She said that the later Flynn of Rocky Mountain was the "Errol Flynn I knew."

 

In reference to her father's tempestuous relationship with director Michael Curtiz, Rory said that he hated him, that hatred beginning with the making of their second film together, Charge of the Light Brigade. Flynn, an animal lover, was angered by Curtiz's blatant disregard for the treatment of the horses during the making of that film, she said. Many horses were killed as a result of the "running W" wires used to bring them down, breaking many of their legs (not to mention a threat, as well, I might add, to the stuntmen riding them).

 

(Flynn later wrote in his autobiography that he reported the treatment of the horses on that film's shoot to the Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, or some such equivalent that existed in California at that time).

 

Perhaps Rory was a little nervous in the interview. For whatever reason, I did notice a couple of inaccuracies in her interview with Robert. She stated that her mother, Nora Eddington, had the longest of Flynn's three marriages. (In fact, it was the shortest, though, to be fair, years after the bitterness of their breakup Nora and Errol became friends again - in fact just a month almost to the day before his death he told her that doctors had not given him long to live).

 

Rory also repeated a couple of times that her father was 37 when he suffered a mild heart attack during the making of Gentleman Jim (he was, in fact, 33).

 

The biggest surprise to me, though, was Rory's statement that she had just discovered two years ago that Michael Curtiz had been briefly married to her father's first wife, Lili Damita, years before Errol met her and she wondered if this didn't have some kind of influence on the hostile Flynn-Curtiz relationship.

 

For starters, talk of a Curtiz-Damita marriage has been in circulation, particularly on the internet, for more than two years. And it is a "fact" of which I've never seen any kind of corroboration. That includes a single quote of any kind (to the best of my knowledge) from any one of Curtiz, Damita or Flynn. I have long strongly suspected that it is yet another myth that has received wide circulation, without anyone ever stopping to investigate the basis for it.

 

With Rory repeating the Curtiz-Damita marriage talk as fact, however, it makes me wonder. I wish that she could have provided some kind of source as verification of its accuracy. However, obviously, a brief interview with Robert Osborne doesn't provide the opportunity for that.

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Rory Flynn on TCM last evening:

 

"What I need now is to make sure that my father's name is remembered and rejoiced. He did make millions of people happy.

 

I know he's been the black sheep in Hollywood. I know that he hasn't been recognized by his peers. They sort of brush aside the fact that he became a very good actor. And you can see this in The Forstye Woman, Kim and the Barrymore movie (Too Much Too Soon).

 

Hopefully one day they will honour him and that's the day I look forward to. Hopefully my son will be there to also enjoy it."

 

It was really nice to see Rory (as well as TCM) paying homage to her father last night on the channel. Her memories of her father are understandably limited (she was 12 when he died) but she did speak of him as a very romantic man, who, on one of her mother's birthdays, filled their pool with gardenias, an aroma that filled their home for three memorable days afterwards.

 

When asked by Robert to select the film that she thinks best sums up Errol Flynn, his daughter picked They Died With Their Boots On, saying that the Custer role captured many aspects of her father, his brashness, romantic nature and leadership capabilities. (She omitted the fact that the early portions of the film provided him with an excellent opportunity to demonstrate his impressive ability with light hearted humour, as well).

 

About Rocky Mountain, a little remembered western that Flynn made in 1950, Rory contrasted his performance as a rugged westerner in it to some of the earlier, more flamboyant portrayals in his previous westerns. She said that the later Flynn of Rocky Mountain was the "Errol Flynn I knew."

 

In reference to her father's tempestuous relationship with director Michael Curtiz, Rory said that he hated him, that hatred beginning with the making of their second film together, Charge of the Light Brigade. Flynn, an animal lover, was angered by Curtiz's blatant disregard for the treatment of the horses during the making of that film, she said. Many horses were killed as a result of the "running W" wires used to bring them down, breaking many of their legs (not to mention a threat, as well, I might add, to the stuntmen riding them).

 

(Flynn later wrote in his autobiography that he reported the treatment of the horses on that film's shoot to the Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, or some such equivalent that existed in California at that time).

 

Perhaps Rory was a little nervous in the interview. For whatever reason, I did notice a couple of inaccuracies in her interview with Robert. She stated that her mother, Nora Eddington, had the longest of Flynn's three marriages. (In fact, it was the shortest, though, to be fair, years after the bitterness of their breakup Nora and Errol became friends again - in fact just a month almost to the day before his death he told her that doctors had not given him long to live).

 

Rory also repeated a couple of times that her father was 37 when he suffered a mild heart attack during the making of Gentleman Jim (he was, in fact, 33).

 

The biggest surprise to me, though, was Rory's statement that she had just discovered two years ago that Michael Curtiz had been briefly married to her father's first wife, Lili Damita, years before Errol met her and she wondered if this didn't have some kind of influence on the hostile Flynn-Curtiz relationship.

 

For starters, talk of a Curtiz-Damita marriage has been in circulation, particularly on the internet, for more than two years. And it is a "fact" of which I've never seen any kind of corroboration. That includes a single quote of any kind (to the best of my knowledge) from any one of Curtiz, Damita or Flynn. I have long strongly suspected that it is yet another myth that has received wide circulation, without anyone ever stopping to investigate the basis for it.

 

With Rory repeating the Curtiz-Damita marriage talk as fact, however, it makes me wonder. I wish that she could have provided some kind of source as verification of its accuracy. However, obviously, a brief interview with Robert Osborne doesn't provide the opportunity for that.

 

It was interesting hearing Rory talk.    As for the Curtiz-Damita marriage;   Did this take place in Europe?   That would make it harder to investigate (confirm),  but if it was in the USA finding out about it should be fairly easy for a newpaper reporter.  

 

Anyway it was great seeing her speak about her famous father.

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When asked by Robert to select the film that she thinks best sums up Errol Flynn, his daughter picked They Died With Their Boots On, saying that the Custer role captured many aspects of her father, his brashness, romantic nature and leadership capabilities. (She omitted the fact that the early portions of the film provided him with an excellent opportunity to demonstrate his impressive ability with light hearted humour, as well).

 

 

Good point here Tom, but let us not forget here that there's great humor to found THROUGHOUT "Gentleman Jim", and which I believe she and Bob also failed to mention in the lead-in to its showing last night, if I recall correctly.

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