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Food in the movies


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Naw, I don't mean the popcorn in the theaters.

 

I'm talking about the food IN the movies themselves.

 

Did you ever wonder.....is it REAL?  Do they actually EAT it in those movies?  How OLD is it?  Did they bother to REFRESH IT between takes?  DID Paul Newman REALLY eat that many hard boiled eggs?

 

I mentioned LIBERTY VALANCE in another thread....WERE those steaks REAL?

 

In SCROOGE, (A Christmas Carol), we see Alastair Sim as Scrooge sitting in an inn and demanding of a young man, supposedly a waiter, "More Bread!".   the young man replies, "It's a ha' penny extra."  To which Scrooge says, "No more bread!"  But, WHAT was the meal he had beforehand?

 

And just WHAT is "gruel"?  And was that REALLY gruel in the bowl he was holding when supposedly Marley's ghost comes into the room?

 

In "It's A Wonderful Life", there's a scene where Jimmy Stewart, as George Bailey, is talking with Samuel Hinds, who plays George's father.  He's having dinner, and what he's eating isn't clear....but it looks good, and I've long wondered just WHAT it was supposed to be.  My wife thinks it looks like liver and onions, but I'm not so sure.

 

There's a movie with Walter Slezak and Cary Grant in which the two are having a conversation, and all the while, Slezak is carefully and surgically( it looks like) removing the skin from a length of sausage.  WHAT kind of sausage isn't clear.  Is it Knockwurst?  old Hungarian Kolbacz  Fresh Polish keilbasa?  Italian?  Looks like it could be ANY of those.

 

Are all those "B" level actors and extras eating actual K-rations in those old war movies?

 

Did Paul Sorvino really suck down that many REAL oysters in DICK TRACY?

 

And WHAT meal was in those cool looking containers that were brought into Jimmy Stewart's apartment supposedly from the "21" club by Grace Kelly in REAR WINDOW?

 

Can you think of any others?  And DO any of you have any ideas as to what WERE those meals I mentioned?

 

I know, it doesn't matter, but I thought it beats griping about "frequently shown movies", or complaining about JOHN WAYNE, or discussing whether or not we SHOULD be discussing CITIZEN KANE!  :D

 

 

Sepiatone

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Why, SEPIA! I do believe you've forgotten to mention one of the most famous eating scenes in film there IS here...

 

cab9da9cb50c8f0206d76ecd9516bad2.jpg

 

I'm 'Enery tha AYETH, I am.

 

'Enery tha Ayeth, I am, I am.

 

I jus' loves me these chicken legs, I do.

 

And then I throws 'em over me shoulder when I'm through

 

I'm the bloke who broke from tha Vatican

 

'Cause I wanted me a pretty new young wife

 

I'm the AYETH of all the 'Enerys

 

'Enery tha AYETH, I am, I am

 

'Enery tha AYETH, I am

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Naw, I don't mean the popcorn in the theaters.

 

I'm talking about the food IN the movies themselves.

 

Did you ever wonder.....is it REAL?  Do they actually EAT it in those movies?  How OLD is it?  Did they bother to REFRESH IT between takes?  DID Paul Newman REALLY eat that many hard boiled eggs?

 

I mentioned LIBERTY VALANCE in another thread....WERE those steaks REAL?

 

In SCROOGE, (A Christmas Carol), we see Alastair Sim as Scrooge sitting in an inn and demanding of a young man, supposedly a waiter, "More Bread!".   the young man replies, "It's a ha' penny extra."  To which Scrooge says, "No more bread!"  But, WHAT was the meal he had beforehand?

 

And just WHAT is "gruel"?  And was that REALLY gruel in the bowl he was holding when supposedly Marley's ghost comes into the room?

 

In "It's A Wonderful Life", there's a scene where Jimmy Stewart, as George Bailey, is talking with Samuel Hinds, who plays George's father.  He's having dinner, and what he's eating isn't clear....but it looks good, and I've long wondered just WHAT it was supposed to be.  My wife thinks it looks like liver and onions, but I'm not so sure.

 

There's a movie with Walter Slezak and Cary Grant in which the two are having a conversation, and all the while, Slezak is carefully and surgically( it looks like) removing the skin from a length of sausage.  WHAT kind of sausage isn't clear.  Is it Knockwurst?  old Hungarian Kolbacz  Fresh Polish keilbasa?  Italian?  Looks like it could be ANY of those.

 

Are all those "B" level actors and extras eating actual K-rations in those old war movies?

 

Did Paul Sorvino really suck down that many REAL oysters in DICK TRACY?

 

And WHAT meal was in those cool looking containers that were brought into Jimmy Stewart's apartment supposedly from the "21" club by Grace Kelly in REAR WINDOW?

 

Can you think of any others?  And DO any of you have any ideas as to what WERE those meals I mentioned?

 

I know, it doesn't matter, but I thought it beats griping about "frequently shown movies", or complaining about JOHN WAYNE, or discussing whether or not we SHOULD be discussing CITIZEN KANE!  :D

 

 

Sepiatone

a helluva waste of good food then.

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I would believe it is a multiple of things, one thing for certain it won't be real ice cream!!! most likely mashed potatoes.  Another issue would be food safety under the hot lights and in outdoor scenes.  I can't imagine a director wanting everyone to get salmonella in the process of shooting a movie. 

 

I always note that caterers are listed in the credits so maybe the food they use is supplied by caterers.  I don't suppose when the actors are eating in the movies it is cardboard or plastic.  So just think...you have to consider food safety, food styling, allergies and other items. 

 

The first modern movie I see I will look and see in the credits if there are others than caterers noted.

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I'd think the caterers in the credits are the people who provide the food the cast and crew eats for lunch/dinner on shooting days, or especially if the film is shooting on locatoin and they can't eat anyplace else.

 

As for whether they're eating actual food, I distinctly recall Anthony Bourdain saying back in March when he did the Friday Night Spotlight something about one of the films (I think it was Babette's Feast) that they were eating the foods mentioned for the foods that Babette mentioned, with one exception -- it might have been the quails in sarcophagus, but I don't remember.

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Director Tony Richardson made two back-to-back films that feature important and memorable scenes with food: Tom Jones (1963); followed by his first Hollywood film, The Loved One (1965). In both of these films, I think it's pretty obvious that at least some of the food is being consumed.

 

 

tom-jones-eating-scene-joyce-redman-phot

 

10254229_305935259562988_1730590721_a.jp

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Y'know, Emily----It doesn't have to be a modern movie.  A couple of the examples I used weren't modern movies.

 

Just speaking generally, and wondering WERE they eating actual food?  In the case of IAWL, It certainly LOOKS to be, so there's that.

 

And just WHY are you certain it ISN'T real Ice Cream?

 

 

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And just WHY are you certain it ISN'T real Ice Cream?

I can't speak for the previous poster, but I'd bet it's because ice cream would melt under the hot lights needed for the motion picture camera, as they do take after take after take. It's much like in Mystery of the Wax Museum where the wax statues look so realistic... because they are real people: the wax statues they intended to use melted under the lights necessary for the humongous two-strip Technicolor cameras.

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As for whether they're eating actual food, I distinctly recall Anthony Bourdain saying back in March when he did the Friday Night Spotlight something about one of the films (I think it was Babette's Feast) that they were eating the foods mentioned for the foods that Babette mentioned, with one exception -- it might have been the quails in sarcophagus, but I don't remember.

 

Most likely it was the turtle soup that wasn't authentic.

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Ha.. and I don't know WHY it's my favorite.. but it just makes be laugh. Meanwhile.. I am guessing that yes.. the food in THIS movie was real. (but if not.. then boy, is that Bill Murray a great actor or WHAT?) 

Ro -- I love that scene! Haven't thought about that film since it came out!  

 

I love Ann Harding, so beautiful and talented. And she can cook!  Here (at around the 6:40 point) is her virtuosic cooking scene, from Double Harness (1933):

 

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OK, before some of you go completely off the deep end----

 

I don't think the dead people the zombies were supposed to be eating in the original "Night Of The Living Dead" were real.

 

I DO think the fruit in the fruit salad Jerry Lewis was trying to eat in "The Bellboy" WAS real.

 

WHAT'S it matter?

 

I DON'T CARE what anybody's favorite food scene in which old or new movie was.....

 

I was merely asking about if anybody ever wondered about the food that was shown in old movies.  Like my asking just WHAT George Bailey's Father was supposed to be eating in that one scene?

 

How this EVER drifted into a mention of ANTHONY BOREDOM---er, BOURDAIN, is beyond me!

 

As for BILL MURRAY being a good actor or not----I always preferred brother BRIAN DOYLE, personally.....

 

 

 

Sepiatone

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please excuse any distraction from my part for the original intent of your post.. enjoy your thread however you see fit. 

Not to worry, rohanaka. Almost all the threads on this board veer off from the original topic.

 

Must be the upcoming holidays making lots of folks tense here today.

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Ro -- I love that scene! Haven't thought about that film since it came out!  

 

I love Ann Harding, so beautiful and talented. And she can cook!  Here (at around the 6:40 point) is her virtuosic cooking scene, from Double Harness (1933):

 

I can't believe she got the top off of that can without losing a finger! I'm glad I don't have to use a can opener like that.

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In the Depression era movies there was often some poor schlub who looked

longingly through the window at some yummy grub being cooked in a

diner. Seems some short order cook was always slapping a nice juicy

burger on the grill. The guy in I Am a Fugitive From a Chain Gang never got

to eat his. Bummer. Then there was that awful watery junk that came out of

a slop bucket in the prison flicks, sometimes with insects included.Yuck.

Throw in some of that maggot filled slop in SHAWSHANK and you got me wondering why about a lot of this stuff.  Like WERE those real maggots, and if they were, did they do a quick sleight of hand SWAP before the guy playing the con shoved a forkful in his yap?

 

Yeah,----DID that guy really cook a couple of burgers in fugitive ?  Or were they already cooked and he only played at it?

 

But I haven't had breakfast yet, so excuse me..........

 

Sepiatone

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I don't know, but any actor who will eat real maggots is truly

dedicated to their craft.

 

I believe the cook had already thrown the burgers on the grill

and they were still cooking when his "friend" decided to rob

the joint, and he never got to eat it. I suppose back in those

day they didn't ask You want fries with that?

 

The difference in acting style between Laurence Olivier and Dustin Hoffman is that Olivier would look convincing eating fake maggots while Hoffman would demand that he be served real ones!

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Did they bother to REFRESH IT between takes?

 

This takes me to the dinner party scene of The Thin Man.  It's one of the rare scenes in that film that required multiple takes, as William Powell had trouble getting through all the "whodunit" dialogue.  They did not refresh the oysters between takes, and it didn't take long for them to start putrefying under the lights.  The cast couldn't bear to even think of oysters for some time after that.  And, in the script, when Nick notes that Jorgensen isn't eating, that's all there is to it.  But in the film, Nick follows it up with "Don't you care for oysters?"  So that seems to be a Powell ad lib, and something that always makes me laugh, knowing the backstory.

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I've also heard that in many movies or television shows, that when someone is supposed to be eating ice cream, they're really eating mashed potatoes.  The ice cream would melt too quickly under the hot studio lighting.  Mashed potatoes are a little more hearty. 

 

The impression I get from the food in the movies is that a lot of times, because of the film being in black and white that the food looks really unappetizing.  Whatever it is supposed to be.  I would have to think in films where the actors are supposed to be imbibing heavily, that they've got to be drinking juice or something that would resemble a cocktail.  Otherwise, if there were too many takes, the actors would probably be hammered by the end of the scene. 

 

In The Adventures of Robin Hood for example, it sure looked like they were eating mutton and duck.  You can see bites being taken out and it sure looked like they were swallowing.  Although I can imagine if there were going to be multiple takes of an eating scene, that the actors would eventually probably start spitting it out.

 

I have noticed in some movies, when tea or coffee has been supposedly poured into a cup or soup is supposedly being eaten, sometimes you can't even see anything in the cup or on the spoon.  Makes me wonder if they're just pretend eating-- which looks really hokey in a movie if it is obvious that they're drinking air!

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Actors are lucky if it's mashed potatoes subbing for ice cream; sometimes it's shortening. 

 

You'll notice actors pushing food around their plate and chewing a long time, because if they actually ate the food every take they be stuffed - or sick.  The guy playing Julie Powell's husband in Julie and Julia got a bit too excited by the tasty food on display and wound up paying for it.

 

Cups are usually empty to avoid spillage.  And, yes, wine/liquor is actually a non-alcoholic drink of the same color.  For the most part - there have been some amusing exceptions, although I don't think that happens much anymore.

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I love the diner scene in "I Am A Fugitive From A Chain Gang"!  The tiny size of the diner is only matched by the teeny tiny hamburgers on the grill.   I know they were free, but I often wonder if Muni's hobo pal held up the diner because he was peeved at the size of the burgers!

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I love the diner scene in "I Am A Fugitive From A Chain Gang"!  The tiny size of the diner is only matched by the teeny tiny hamburgers on the grill.   I know they were free, but I often wonder if Muni's hobo pal held up the diner because he was peeved at the size of the burgers!

 

Holding up a diner that is giving away food for free isn't very bright.

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