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Noirs are for night time


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I'm gone all day, great Noirs are on, come home and all I have to look at are Dramas :wacko:

 

 

Yeah, I'll second that.  We get the same old suspects in primetime. How about accomodating working people?

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But plenty of similar type films.........

 

Wow,  those 6 words could lead to a major debate;   I guess it comes down to what you mean by 'similar type films';  For example, gangster films are similar,  in some ways, to a noir film but at the same time one could also say they are way different.

 

I tend to lean toward the 'they are way different' POV.

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Wow,  those 6 words could lead to a major debate;   I guess it comes down to what you mean by 'similar type films';  For example, gangster films are similar,  in some ways, to a noir film but at the same time one could also say they are way different.

 

I tend to lean toward the 'they are way different' POV.

 

 

When I mentioned 30s films I didnt mean noirs in general, just that more 30s films are shown during the day than at night (particularly the less well known ones) I could never keep up if I recorded them all. Nighttime is usually the usual suspects that are shown over and over again.....

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This thread should be moved back to General Discussions because it is about scheduling, not necessarily Noir movies.

BTW, appears to me that precisely determining that a movie is "Film Noir" is difficult.  There is a blending or continum from Noir through mystery through drama and maybe even into comedy.  

For example, are The Big Steal, His KInd of Woman and Macao Film Noir or mystery or drama?  Big Steal has touches of comedy.

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This thread should be moved back to General Discussions because it is about scheduling, not necessarily Noir movies.

BTW, appears to me that precisely determining that a movie is "Film Noir" is difficult.  There is a blending or continum from Noir through mystery through drama and maybe even into comedy.  

For example, are The Big Steal, His KInd of Woman and Macao Film Noir or mystery or drama?  Big Steal has touches of comedy.

Agreed, check out The Big Lebowski (1998) if you haven't yet, an updating of the wrong man/falsely accused/mistaken identity trope to the stoner age, Jeff Bridges as "the Dude" is priceless.

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This thread should be moved back to General Discussions because it is about scheduling, not necessarily Noir movies.

BTW, appears to me that precisely determining that a movie is "Film Noir" is difficult.  There is a blending or continum from Noir through mystery through drama and maybe even into comedy.  

For example, are The Big Steal, His KInd of Woman and Macao Film Noir or mystery or drama?  Big Steal has touches of comedy.

 

 

Someone must go running to the mods and they bend to his wishes. Nice.

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This thread should be moved back to General Discussions because it is about scheduling, not necessarily Noir movies.

BTW, appears to me that precisely determining that a movie is "Film Noir" is difficult.  There is a blending or continum from Noir through mystery through drama and maybe even into comedy.  

For example, are The Big Steal, His KInd of Woman and Macao Film Noir or mystery or drama?  Big Steal has touches of comedy.

 

First let me say that someone does need to lighten up (and it isn't you).

 

As for how to classify movies;   well a few things I use in these discussions is that there are major genres and then sub-genres.

 

E.g.   Drama and comedy are major genres.      noir is a sub-genre of drama.   (so are mystery and crime films)

 

For a movie to be a comedy the plot line is mostly fluff (nonsense) as well as the vast majority of the action is comic.   His Kind of Women has a lot of comedy (Vincent Price in a great role),  but a serious plot line.

 

But the million dollar question is when is a mystery or crime film NOT a noir?     (I put the question this way since most noirs are mystery and \ or crime films but not the inverse).

 

To me the key is what motivates the characters.     The concept of a complex protagonist with an existential awareness of his or her situation.   Of course there are movies from other genres that have a similar narrative and visual preoccupation as film noir.

 

In a standard gangster film the gangster has a demented idealism.   Rocco, Tom in Little Caesar,  Scarface;  these guys never really had doubts about themselves.   In a noir the gangster are compelled to contemplate their own destruction.

 

A western can't be a noir by defintion because of the setting,  but many westerns have strong noir elements; My Darling Clementine, Blood on the Moon, Pursued  (with Mitchum which adds a noir element just by having him), and Station West (Dick Powell and Jane Greer).

 

Period Films line The Lodger, Hanover Square,  Bluebread and The Suspect have noir elements but like a western the setting isn't noir.

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First let me say that someone does need to lighten up (and it isn't you).

 

As for how to classify movies;   well a few things I use in these discussions is that there are major genres and then sub-genres.

 

E.g.   Drama and comedy are major genres.      noir is a sub-genre of drama.   (so are mystery and crime films)

 

For a movie to be a comedy the plot line is mostly fluff (nonsense) as well as the vast majority of the action is comic.   His Kind of Women has a lot of comedy (Vincent Price in a great role),  but a serious plot line.

 

But the million dollar question is when is a mystery or crime film NOT a noir?     (I put the question this way since most noirs are mystery and \ or crime films but not the inverse).

 

To me the key is what motivates the characters.     The concept of a complex protagonist with an existential awareness of his or her situation.   Of course there are movies from other genres that have a similar narrative and visual preoccupation as film noir.

 

In a standard gangster film the gangster has a demented idealism.   Rocco, Tom in Little Caesar,  Scarface;  these guys never really had doubts about themselves.   In a noir the gangster are compelled to contemplate their own destruction.

 

A western can't be a noir by defintion because of the setting,  but many westerns have strong noir elements; My Darling Clementine, Blood on the Moon, Pursued  (with Mitchum which adds a noir element just by having him), and Station West (Dick Powell and Jane Greer).

 

Period Films line The Lodger, Hanover Square,  Bluebread and The Suspect have noir elements but like a western the setting isn't noir.

Another great period noir is The Tall Target

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