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If GOOD NEWS Is Set In 1927, ...


Palmerin
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Because Hollywood apparently has a hard time getting costumes and hairstyles right, especially in musicals or comedies.  You can always tell when a movie was made because it looks like it was made in that era, rather than when the story actually takes place.  Musicals are really guilty of this and and it seems like if a story takes place in the '20s it will still look like the '40s.  About the only things they get right are the cars.

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1. Fashions of the time -- the vast majority of cowboys had facial hair, which you seldom see in classic-era westerns

 

2. When Garson Kanin was directing a Ginger Rogers film he asked the producer why GR changed outfits in every scene when she was playing a working girl on a small salary. He was told that for many women in the audience the movies were the only chance they got to see the latest fashions.

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Because Hollywood apparently has a hard time getting costumes and hairstyles right, especially in musicals or comedies.  You can always tell when a movie was made because it looks like it was made in that era, rather than when the story actually takes place.  Musicals are really guilty of this and and it seems like if a story takes place in the '20s it will still look like the '40s.  About the only things they get right are the cars.

 

While I agree with you,  it isn't that the studio and those making these films didn't know what was right.   What they did know is that the majority of the audience didn't care.   The audience,  especially the women,  often went to musicals and other escape type films to see the latest fashions and hair styles.     So being realistic was not as important as being in fashion.

 

But looking at these films decades after they were released exposes this.

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The Ginger Rogers film Roxie Hart takes place in the 20s, so Ginger is supposed to be a flapper type of girl. They didn't even come close, probably didn't try.

 

Roxie%2BHart%2B%2525281942%252529%2B3.jp

 

The more hip and fashionable something is at the time, the faster it becomes dated. Really, I'm surprised they got the cars right most of the time. Old movies loved to sell cars just as much as clothes and hairstyles.

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While I agree with you,  it isn't that the studio and those making these films didn't know what was right.   What they did know is that the majority of the audience didn't care.   The audience,  especially the women,  often went to musicals and other escape type films to see the latest fashions and hair styles.     So being realistic was not as important as being in fashion.

 

But looking at these films decades after they were released exposes this.

So an obsession with fashion trumps the realism necessary to make an story credible? No wonder so many filmmakers have nothing but contempt for the intelligence of their audience!

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I just watched this film today. I have it on a disc called June Allyson & Peter Lawford. I love-love-love this film.

 

But what I thought was more of an anachronism was that the songs seemed to have a very 40s feel to them-- like they would be songs that one would have heard on the radio at that time. The music did not seem to be in the style of compositions from the late 20s.

 

I can overlook this and even the hairstyles and clothing, because the rest of the picture is sublime.

 

P.S. I think the only way around these minor problems is if they had framed it with an opening sequence where kids in 1947 were looking at yearbooks from twenty years earlier and decided to put on a show or make a movie about 1927. So it would have been a story within a story, and them using modern day fashions and music would have been understandable. Just a thought!

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Because Hollywood apparently has a hard time getting costumes and hairstyles right, especially in musicals or comedies.  You can always tell when a movie was made because it looks like it was made in that era, rather than when the story actually takes place.  Musicals are really guilty of this and and it seems like if a story takes place in the '20s it will still look like the '40s.  About the only things they get right are the cars.

They figure it's not worth the additional money if most viewers won't notice. Viewers WILL notice the cars and know which cars are from which periods.

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So an obsession with fashion trumps the realism necessary to make an story credible? No wonder so many filmmakers have nothing but contempt for the intelligence of their audience!

 

Sad but I believe this is often the case (as it relates to making a story credible).   Movies are made to make money and that means giving the audience what they want.   

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