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LILY (1953)


roverrocks
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I am absolutely smitten with LILY (1953) tonight and with Leslie Caron.  I had never seen this gem before.  An absolute gem to me.  A film of wonder and love.  THIS shows the magic of Hollywood far more than any modern CGI monstrosity could.  Thanks TCM.

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You are not the only one....there's another regular poster who sang it's praises last year. I recorded it this time around and am looking forward to seeing it-especially since it made an impression on you too!

For someone who 'came late' to the Hollywood studio system, Caron certainly made her share of well loved classic films. 

 

Hopefully someday talent & charm will triumph over explosions and "effects".

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I am absolutely smitten with LILY (1953) tonight and with Leslie Caron.  I had never seen this gem before.  An absolute gem to me.  A film of wonder and love.  THIS shows the magic of Hollywood far more than any modern CGI monstrosity could.  Thanks TCM.

If you're so smitten, it's spelled LILI.

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I am absolutely smitten with LILY (1953) tonight and with Leslie Caron.  I had never seen this gem before.  An absolute gem to me.  A film of wonder and love.  THIS shows the magic of Hollywood far more than any modern CGI monstrosity could.  Thanks TCM.

 

Yes,  Lili is a very nice and moving film and as you noted a film of wonder and love.   

 

Leslie Caron is starring in a play about 5 miles from where I live.   I should check it out to see if there is any magic there as well.

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I am absolutely smitten with LILY (1953) tonight and with Leslie Caron.  I had never seen this gem before.  An absolute gem to me.  A film of wonder and love.  THIS shows the magic of Hollywood far more than any modern CGI monstrosity could.  Thanks TCM.

You're so right about the movie. I saw it as a kid in a theater and never forgot it, though it wasn't until the 1970's I was able to see it again in a revival house. Seeing it then I was struck by how adult it is, as well as being a story of childlike innocence. Robert's cohost mentioned that it has some dark themes below the surface; these people are carnival folk after all. It's a beautiful movie which can be enjoyed by young people and adults, each in their own way.

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My mother hated this movie so whenever someone would mention it as being a favorite of theirs she would make some sort of dismissive remark.

I never discussed with her  why she had such a strong negative reaction to it.

 

I've never seen the movie in his entirety. I think perhaps I might have enjoyed it if I had seen it as a young child. . . if my mother would have allowed us to view it.

I caught the bit recenty on TCM with Leslie Caron talking to the puppets. It seemed strange that she seemed to think they were real.

Maybe her "character" was supposed to be younger than she looked.

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Your Mom was in good company Holden as Robert Osborne's discussion said that Dore Schary was ready to put Lily on the shelf when he saw it before it was ever seen by the public. The discussion went on to say that the studio wanted Charles Walters to make the dance sequences big production numbers like An American In Paris, but he stood his ground and just wanted them to reflect the emotions of the characters. Walters went on to get his one and only Oscar nomination. I see why you would feel the way you do from watching Lily and the puppets, but I think you may feel differently seeing it in its entirety as some of those "loopholes" close, or at least I think they do. And again, I have never seen it before, and just thoroughly enjoyed it. And yes, MissWonderly, Mel Ferrar really had an intensity I don't think I ever saw in him again.

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You're so right about the movie. I saw it as a kid in a theater and never forgot it, though it wasn't until the 1970's I was able to see it again in a revival house. Seeing it then I was struck by how adult it is, as well as being a story of childlike innocence. Robert's cohost mentioned that it has some dark themes below the surface; these people are carnival folk after all. It's a beautiful movie which can be enjoyed by young people and adults, each in their own way.

 

 

Ahh, glove. . . .

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My mother hated this movie so whenever someone would mention it as being a favorite of theirs she would make some sort of dismissive remark.

I never discussed with her  why she had such a strong negative reaction to it.

 

I've never seen the movie in his entirety. I think perhaps I might have enjoyed it if I had seen it as a young child. . . if my mother would have allowed us to view it.

I caught the bit recenty on TCM with Leslie Caron talking to the puppets. It seemed strange that she seemed to think they were real.

Maybe her "character" was supposed to be younger than she looked.

How interesting--but kind of sad.  My mother made me go see it with her. To me, it looked like a movie "for girls" and I was prepared to be all bored and miserable through the whole thing, like it was the time she took me to see Grace Kelly in The Country Girl --how far above a 9 year old boy's head could any movie get?  But! I loved Lily, fell precociously in love with Leslie Caron, and went around singing and humming and whistling that theme song for at least a week afterward. And I asked her if I could get a puppet for Christmas.

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  I concur with the opinions expressed here as to what a wonderful and remarkable achievement LILI is.

 

  However, I wonder how many people here are familiar with an earlier movie dealing with a young woman and a puppeteer which I saw at the Film Forum in New York many years ago. While it has some similarities with LILI it is a different and somewhat darker story yet also fine in its own way. The title of the movie was I AM SUZANNE! (1933) from Fox and it starred Lillian Harvey and Gene Raymond as the puppeteer. Leslie Banks also had a prominent role.

 

   Unfortunately, it is rarely ever shown.

 

   The director was Rowland V. Lee noted for among other films, ZOO IN BUDAPEST and SON OF FRANKENSTEIN.

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I can't recall I AM SUZANNE! ever being shown on TCM and if I'm not mistaken it's only in the last few years that TCM has had a contract to show a good number of Fox films.

 

  Sorry it took me so long to respond.

 

TCM is showing more Fox films in the last few years (e.g. Laura),  but not enough.    This is why I watch MOVIES from time to time.  The majority of the films they show are Fox films,  but they have commercials and they censor for content.  

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In her interview with Robert Osborne I remember Leslie saying LiLi was actually her least favorite film. She found the character she played rather silly and insipid.

I've never seen the entire movie, but in the parts I have seen the character seems to be behaving much younger than she physically appears to be.

I wondered if the character was supposed to be child but was played by an adult actor.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I finally got to watch it last night....loved it!

 

I saw Lili as a young innocent girl who has led a sheltered life. She was completely at a loss of what to do when her "means of support" had disappeared from her. The movie was about her discovery of life, "learning" as she says. It also seems like the story of the puppeteer's "discovery" of life too. In that sense, it's very sweet.

 

The puppet aspect strikes me as a symbol of psychotherapy, but it might as that's what I studied in college.

 

What I found objectionable was the slap. It was hard, mean and a reaction to the puppeteer's self loathing or inadequacies. Definitely wrong to inflict upon Lili. I would NEVER put up with a violent mistake like that from a man and would instruct my daughter not to either. I understand the gesture and understand how someone (Lili) could forgive him and run back to him.

But I certainly wouldn't.

 

And I worry about her future with someone not in control of their anger....I know, it's only a movie.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I finally got to watch it last night....loved it!

 

I saw Lili as a young innocent girl who has led a sheltered life. She was completely at a loss of what to do when her "means of support" had disappeared from her. The movie was about her discovery of life, "learning" as she says. It also seems like the story of the puppeteer's "discovery" of life too. In that sense, it's very sweet.

 

The puppet aspect strikes me as a symbol of psychotherapy, but it might as that's what I studied in college.

 

What I found objectionable was the slap. It was hard, mean and a reaction to the puppeteer's self loathing or inadequacies. Definitely wrong to inflict upon Lili. I would NEVER put up with a violent mistake like that from a man and would instruct my daughter not to either. I understand the gesture and understand how someone (Lili) could forgive him and run back to him.

But I certainly wouldn't.

 

And I worry about her future with someone not in control of their anger....I know, it's only a movie.

Watched LILI again this morning.  Certainly a feelgood fantasy I love except for that vicious slap which should not have been in the movie.  Made no sense to have that violent slap in this movie.  None.

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I finally got to watch it last night....loved it!

 

I saw Lili as a young innocent girl who has led a sheltered life. She was completely at a loss of what to do when her "means of support" had disappeared from her. The movie was about her discovery of life, "learning" as she says. It also seems like the story of the puppeteer's "discovery" of life too. In that sense, it's very sweet.

 

The puppet aspect strikes me as a symbol of psychotherapy, but it might as that's what I studied in college.

 

What I found objectionable was the slap. It was hard, mean and a reaction to the puppeteer's self loathing or inadequacies. Definitely wrong to inflict upon Lili. I would NEVER put up with a violent mistake like that from a man and would instruct my daughter not to either. I understand the gesture and understand how someone (Lili) could forgive him and run back to him.

But I certainly wouldn't.

 

And I worry about her future with someone not in control of their anger....I know, it's only a movie.

Actually, it's not. It's a symbol of the place of women in a certain place in time.

 

Would Lili forgive him today, were she an enlightened and empowered woman?

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