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Thanks, TCM, for introducing me to.....


LonesomePolecat
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I don't know about you, but many of my current favorite films are ones I never even heard of before TCM showed them. Are there any movies TCM has introduced you to that are now among your  favorites?

Excellent question, LP. I wouldn't know where to start on the movies. But as a genre, noir, noir, and more noir.

 

I can't even think of a movie (well, maybe Impact with Brian Donlevy), but I thank TCM for the actors I have met - Marian Marsh, Conrad Veidt, Conrad Nagel, Evelyn Brent, Margot Grahame, Marian Marsh, Trixie Friganza (be sure to catch her short!), Cathy O'Donnell, Clive Brook, Frank Fay, Douglass Montgomery, Gladys George, Jeanne Eagels, Geoffrey Bayldon, Peggy Cummins, Richard Barthelmess, Richard Dix, the gorgeous Ann Harding, the wonderful Lizabeth Scott, and last but most importantly, the lovely and unequaled Warren William.

 

To name just a few. :D

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What's TCM's done for me is to add an enormous amount of depth and breadth to my viewing experience, which previously had been pretty much limited to the AFI Top 100 and movies like that.. 

 

To quantify this:  Before I began following TCM, I'd probably seen but a handful of Barbara Stanwyck movies.   In fact Double Indemnity, The Lady Eve, Meet John Doe, and Ball of Fire are the only ones I'm sure of.  I hadn't even been exposed to Baby Face, Stella Dallas, or Executive Suite.

 

Now I've seen about 60, from The Locked Door to Walk on the Wild Side, and over 50 more in between.

 

I could say the same thing about many other of my favorite actors.  Harlow, Bogart, Crawford, Bette, Cagney, Eddie G, Stewart, and so on.  All of these went from under half a dozen to many dozen or more.  You can throw in all the character actors while you're at it.

 

And beyond that, I've been introduced to an enormous number of actors and directors I'd either never seen at all or fully appreciated:  Ida Lupino, Robert Ryan, Richard Dix, Richard Barthelmess, Loretta Young, Lon Chaney, Glenda Farrell, the list just goes on and on.

 

I think it's not an exaggeration to say that when you combine cost, potential audience reach, and the depth and quality of the product, TCM may just be the single greatest cultural resource in America, "niche" or not.  If there's any other institution that tops TCM in that overall category, it's escaped me up to now.

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I might have to agree with mr. 6666 said in that Dodsworth has become one of my favorites but for some reason I think I may have seen it on AMC before it was shown on TCM, back before AMC went to the dogs. (Side note: boy do they show a lot of commercials on AMC. Yesterday they were showing a triple feature of Don Knotts movies and The Shakiest Gun in the West was in a 2 and half hour time slot for a movie with 101 minute running time. Plus it was the same commercials over and over and over, mostly for G-D Walmart.)

 

I have gotten to "know" a lot of good actors through watching TCM. Fredric March has become a favorite and I didn't know much about his work prior to watching TCM.

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I don't know about you, but many of my current favorite films are ones I never even heard of before TCM showed them. Are there any movies TCM has introduced you to that are now among your  favorites?

But some of these were on home video (VHS) before TCM came along. And most, if not all, did air at least once on the old AMC in the 1980s and early 1990s. 

 

I do agree that TCM is helping to keep a lot of these classics visible, and that is a very good thing in my opinion!

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I don't know about you, but many of my current favorite films are ones I never even heard of before TCM showed them. Are there any movies TCM has introduced you to that are now among your  favorites?

The first one that came to mind was "The Fallen Idol" (1948). I don't know why I'd never seen it because I've watched old movies most of my life. Mostly I'd seen an older Ralph Richardson in supporting roles in epics like "Dr Zhivago" and "Exodus", so it was thrilling to see him showcased in such an intriguing film. The boy was amazing and the whole movie was beautifully atmospheric. It became a favorite instantly and I'll watch it again when it's on in February. Another one which springs to mind is "The Monte Carlo Story" (1956?) with Marlene Dietrich and Vittorio DeSica. I'd never even heard of it that I remembered, but it turned out to be a charming late-in-life romance about two people hoping to marry into wealth while keeping up the facade of still having their own. Dietrich was still stunning in her maturity and DeSica had charm to spare. There was a very delicate play of emotions as they both realized neither had what they were hoping to find but that what they had found instead was priceless. The movie was shot on location, with stunning widescreen shots of Monte Carlo, both the harbor and casino. It's one I treasue. For Christmas, TCM has introduced me to the Seymour Hicks "Scrooge" (1936?) and "Remember the Night", both of which are now favorites.

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I had seen several films TCM shows in its lineup either on late-night television or on my local PBS station, but there are many that I had never seen before TCM was added to my cable roster.  There are so many of them to mention, and I've probably forgotten most of them, but the one's I remember that stand out are:  Wake Island, The Best Years of Our Lives, The Bachelor and the Bobbysoxer, Bad Day at Black Rock, Gentleman's Agreement, Marty, Elmer Gantry, Brute Force, The Killers, Holiday Affair, Out of the Past, These Three, The Beast With Five Fingers, Libeled Lady, and Two Smart People.

 

One thing I appreciate with TCM is the pre-and post-show commentaries provided with many of the films I was familiar with before I got TCM, as well as the films I had not been exposed to before.

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One thing I appreciate with TCM is the pre-and post-show commentaries provided with many of the films I was familiar with before I got TCM, as well as the films I had not been exposed to before.

Some of those are controversial, when the TelePrompTer is wrong and the hosts make on-air gaffes. Though I would say 95% of the time, the wraparounds are accurate.

 

Sometimes the commentary is related to a household name who appears in the film, when the film is actually part of a tribute for a lesser known name. Therefore, the focus may be off on some of these.

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Great post LP!

 

I've stated this many times in various threads across the boards, there are A LOT of films I haven't seen, many of which are considered bona fide classics-- Gone With the Wind, It's a Wonderful Life, Doctor Zhviago, Lawrence of Arabia, the list goes on.  I don't need TCM to introduce me to these films though, I know about them and could obtain them if I wished.

 

What I do need TCM for is to introduce me to the lesser known classics or even the classics that aren't as revered and well known as GWTW.  An example of this would be The Thin Man series.  I know that the first film is a classic, but I feel that it's really only considered a classic among the classic film lover community.  I don't think the film is as well known as other films from The Golden Age.  For years, I had heard of The Thin Man and for some reason, I thought it was a series of Westerns.  I really don't know why I thought that, but I did.  "The Thin Man" just sounded like the name of a cowboy to me.  My dad (who also likes old films) for whatever reason, thought that "The Thin Man" was a sci-fi movie.  It was on TCM when I finally watched The Thin Man and was entranced.  I suddenly loved William Powell, Myrna Loy and Asta.  I loved the relationship between Powell and Loy, loved how the story unfolded, loved Loy's costumes, just loved the whole film.  From then on, I tried to catch the other films in the series.  I am proud to say that because of TCM, I now have all six films in my movie collection. 

 

There are tons of films I found about about thanks to TCM that I've added to my film collection: Picnic, Miss Grant Takes Richmond, Four's a Crowd, Gilda, The Clock, Captain Blood, The Sea Hawk, Auntie Mame, the list goes on and on.

 

There were many of my favorite actors whom I'd seen a few of their films, but thanks to TCM, I was able to see more of their films: Errol Flynn, Bette Davis, Olivia de Havilland, Katharine Hepburn, William Holden, Lucille Ball, Cary Gant, Humphrey Bogart, Gene Kelly, Judy Garland, etc.

 

There are other actors whom I'd heard of (but hadn't seen in action) or learned about for the first time thanks to TCM and people here at this forum: Ida Lupino, Ann Sheridan, Jean Harlow, Fred MacMurray, Claudette Colbert, Barbara Stanwyck, Jean Arthur, Edward G. Robinson, James Cagney, and the list goes on. 

 

I agree with Andy when he stated that TCM is an invaluable resource for classic movie fans and I'm happy to have access to it and to these boards where I can discuss films with like-minded people.  I've learned about a ton of great films here and really appreciate the conversations and information that I've been provided with other the last year or so.

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I don't know about you, but many of my current favorite films are ones I never even heard of before TCM showed them. Are there any movies TCM has introduced you to that are now among your  favorites?

Far, far too many to even start.  In fact, the whole Film Noir genre is one that I wasn't aware of until exposed to it by TCM.  This transitioned into all the crime, gangster, etc. movies of the 30'-50's.  (Oops I hope this doesn't cause this thread to be moved).

Then all the great comedies of the 30's and 40's and 50's, not to mention Sci-Fi.

Not to mention the huge number of actors who were really good at their profession, as opposed to most of the "celebrities" of today.

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Far, far too many to even start.  In fact, the whole Film Noir genre is one that I wasn't aware of until exposed to it by TCM.  This transitioned into all the crime, gangster, etc. movies of the 30'-50's.  (Oops I hope this doesn't cause this thread to be moved).

Then all the great comedies of the 30's and 40's and 50's, not to mention Sci-Fi.

Not to mention the huge number of actors who were really good at their profession, as opposed to most of the "celebrities" of today.

TheCid, I didn't know I liked noir when I watch noir on The Late Late Show or The Million Dollar Movie. Turns out I was noir smart before I even knew I was noir smart.

 

Did you see my list of actors whose names were unknown to me pre-TCM? 

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TheCid, I didn't know I liked noir when I watch noir on The Late Late Show or The Million Dollar Movie. Turns out I was noir smart before I even knew I was noir smart.

 

Did you see my list of actors whose names were unknown to me pre-TCM? 

Yes.  Tried to Like it, but I have used up my 5 positive comments for the day.  Guess now I can just make negative ones.  Agree with your list and could probably add hundreds to it, especially the lesser known ones, character actors and "B"  movie ones.

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Far, far too many to even start.  In fact, the whole Film Noir genre is one that I wasn't aware of until exposed to it by TCM.  This transitioned into all the crime, gangster, etc. movies of the 30'-50's.  (Oops I hope this doesn't cause this thread to be moved).

Then all the great comedies of the 30's and 40's and 50's, not to mention Sci-Fi.

Not to mention the huge number of actors who were really good at their profession, as opposed to most of the "celebrities" of today.

LIKE ! (I went "like" amuck on a different thread earlier today and ran out of likes)

 

I absolutely love film noir.  I had probably only seen two film noir films prior to TCM-- The Maltese Falcon and Double Indemnity.  Thanks to TCM I have seen so many more that I loved: Gilda, the Lake/Ladd collaborations, Conflict... Not TCM persay, but thanks to a recommendation by Dargo on the board this summer, I saw I Wake Up Screaming and loved it.

 

I'm also digging all the gangster films that TCM shows.  Their pre-code Fridays this past September was awesome.  I'm looking forward to the Roadshow Musicals Friday Night Spotlight in March.  I know TCM has its critics, but for my money, TCM always provides me with more films than I can keep up with on my DVR-- I can't say the same for most other channels.

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Excellent question, LP. I wouldn't know where to start on the movies. But as a genre, noir, noir, and more noir.

 

I can't even think of a movie (well, maybe Impact with Brian Donlevy), but I thank TCM for the actors I have met - Marian Marsh, Conrad Veidt, Conrad Nagel, Evelyn Brent, Margot Grahame, Marian Marsh, Trixie Friganza (be sure to catch her short!), Cathy O'Donnell, Clive Brook, Frank Fay, Douglass Montgomery, Gladys George, Jeanne Eagels, Geoffrey Bayldon, Peggy Cummins, Richard Barthelmess, Richard Dix, the gorgeous Ann Harding, the wonderful Lizabeth Scott, and last but most importantly, the lovely and unequaled Warren William.

 

To name just a few. :D

LIKE! (I ran out of likes earlier, lol)

 

While I had heard of the term "pre-code" prior to TCM, I didn't really know what that meant in terms of content of film.  Thanks to the Pre-Code Fridays in September, I got to see quite a few of them.  Now, when I look at the month schedule, I can identify pre-codes by the year of release and some of the actors who appear.  I just learned about Ann Harding and your beloved Warren William. 

 

Ann Harding, in particular stood out to me because of her hair.  There aren't many actresses from that time period who didn't have the bobbed hair with the tight waves.  I wonder how hard her hair was to keep clean?

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LIKE ! (I went "like" amuck on a different thread earlier today and ran out of likes)

 

I absolutely love film noir.  I had probably only seen two film noir films prior to TCM-- The Maltese Falcon and Double Indemnity.  Thanks to TCM I have seen so many more that I loved: Gilda, the Lake/Ladd collaborations, Conflict... Not TCM persay, but thanks to a recommendation by Dargo on the board this summer, I saw I Wake Up Screaming and loved it.

 

I'm also digging all the gangster films that TCM shows.  Their pre-code Fridays this past September was awesome.  I'm looking forward to the Roadshow Musicals Friday Night Spotlight in March.  I know TCM has its critics, but for my money, TCM always provides me with more films than I can keep up with on my DVR-- I can't say the same for most other channels.

If not already viewing, you would probably like the Fox Movie Channel.  They show "old" movies from 3:00 AM ET to 3:00 PM ET and usually without commercials.  A lot of them are noirs, crime and similar not shown on TCM or seldom shown.  Only downside is that they tend to show them often during a week, so not as much variety as TCM.

Try it, you'll like it!

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If not already viewing, you would probably like the Fox Movie Channel.  They show "old" movies from 3:00 AM ET to 3:00 PM ET and usually without commercials.  A lot of them are noirs, crime and similar not shown on TCM or seldom shown.  Only downside is that they tend to show them often during a week, so not as much variety as TCM.

Try it, you'll like it!

I'm not sure I have the Fox Movie Channel! We have Dish right now, but in a couple months, my husband and I hope to be moving into our own house and we're probably going to go with a different provider.  (Right now, we're living with my parents as a means to save up for our house and pay off some debts so I don't have much say in what TV we have).  I've heard a lot about this channel on this board.  When I set up my new TV provider, I'll have to see which plan includes FMC as well as TCM.  It's good to know that FMC is commercial free for 12 hours.  I can't be bothered with commercials.

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Speed racer-you state that The Thin Man wasn't a well known classic. You and your dad must be young. There was a tv series in the 50s based on the movie then sometime in the 70s/80s there was a Broadway musical called Nick & Nora based on the movie. The Neil Simon movie, Murder by Death, which was a spoof of an Agatha Christie type story, had a married couple in it based on Nick & Nora. The plot of the movie is that a famous author invites a bunch of detectives to solve his own murder, or something to that effect (I find it pretty funny and it's going to be on in January when they're doing the Friday Night Showcase with a salute to Simon.) So I feel like people of a certain age are familiar with the characters. The original film had several Oscar nominations.

 

This is in no way a dig at you. I'm not surprised that you wouldn't be aware of them, but I'm just a little surprised your dad isn't unless he's in his 40s. It just makes me feel old.

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LIKE! (I ran out of likes earlier, lol)

 

While I had heard of the term "pre-code" prior to TCM, I didn't really know what that meant in terms of content of film.  Thanks to the Pre-Code Fridays in September, I got to see quite a few of them.  Now, when I look at the month schedule, I can identify pre-codes by the year of release and some of the actors who appear.  I just learned about Ann Harding and your beloved Warren William. 

 

Ann Harding, in particular stood out to me because of her hair.  There aren't many actresses from that time period who didn't have the bobbed hair with the tight waves.  I wonder how hard her hair was to keep clean?

Thanks, speedracer, same here re the likes!

 

Aren't pre-codes wonderful? They are so grown up and so adult and the narrow minded and it blows my mind that the narrow minded little prude Hays or whatever his name was convinced TPTB to shut down truth telling honest movies.

 

I'm SO glad you have been made aware of Ann Harding and my - my, mind you, he's all mine!  :wub:  - beyootiful Warren William! You must, simply must catch Impact when it shows again, it is an amazing noir.

 

You must, simply must also catch anything another favorite of mine is in, Lizabeth Scott. Especially considering she is still with us, aged 92, and I oh so wish TCM would have her in their studio. I would love to see Ben M. interviewing her.

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Yes.  Tried to Like it, but I have used up my 5 positive comments for the day.  Guess now I can just make negative ones.  Agree with your list and could probably add hundreds to it, especially the lesser known ones, character actors and "B"  movie ones.

You could? Kudos to you, youngster. I had to bookmark those I listed and then go back to my bookmarks today to write them down.

 

Ah well, with age comes.........no, not wisdom............humor? Yeah, humor. :D

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Speed racer-you state that The Thin Man wasn't a well known classic. You and your dad must be young. There was a tv series in the 50s based on the movie then sometime in the 70s/80s there was a Broadway musical called Nick & Nora based on the movie. The Neil Simon movie, Murder by Death, which was a spoof of an Agatha Christie type story, had a married couple in it based on Nick & Nora. The plot of the movie is that a famous author invites a bunch of detectives to solve his own murder, or something to that effect (I find it pretty funny and it's going to be on in January when they're doing the Friday Night Showcase with a salute to Simon.) So I feel like people of a certain age are familiar with the characters. The original film had several Oscar nominations.

 

This is in no way a dig at you. I'm not surprised that you wouldn't be aware of them, but I'm just a little surprised your dad isn't unless he's in his 40s. It just makes me feel old.

I was born in the mid 80s, my dad was born in the early 60s.  I had heard of the Nick and Nora TV Show, but that was after I'd seen the movies.

 

Murder By Death sounds interesting.  I'll definitely make sure to DVR it when it airs on TCM.  Thanks for the recommendation!

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