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Only Angels Have Wings (1939)


Notan
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Every time I watch this film, I remember how much I liked it the last time I watched it.

 

Richard Barthelmess gave a great, subtle performance, almost exclusively with his eyes.

 

Does anyone know anything about the performer who sang Adiós Mariquita Linda at approximately 1:54:39 into the film?

 

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This is the best version of this song I have ever heard: simple, unaffected, heartfelt. He is listed in the credits as Maciste, and on IMDB as Manuel Álvarez Maciste, and elsewhere on the web as Manuel Álvarez Rentería Maciste. But beyond a small web page in Spanish (which I ran through Google Translator), I wasn’t able to find out much more about him. He apparently appeared in several Hollywood films.

 

Kid Dabb, I’m looking in your direction.

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Saaaaay, isn't this the flick where Cary sings...wait for it..."Suite: Judy, Judy, Judy's Blue Eyes"???

 

Uh-huh, and YEARS before Crosby, Stills and Nash would do an abridged version of it?!!!

 

(...oh and sorry Notan ol' boy, but the only thing I can tell about that Maciste dude down there is that he kind'a looks like a cross between James Mason and Peter Lorre!!!) 

 

(...oh, and sorry again for bein' such a smarta$$ here) ;)

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Saaaaay, isn't this the flick where Cary sings...wait for it..."Suite: Judy, Judy, Judy's Blue Eyes"???

 

(...uh-huh, and YEARS before Crosby, Stills and Nash would do an abridged version of it?!!!)

 

Back then, everyone wanted to be Cary Grant. Even Crosby, Stills and Nash wanted to be Cary Grant.

 

(Great CSN song, by the way.)

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Back then, everyone wanted to be Cary Grant. Even Crosby, Stills and Nash wanted to be Cary Grant.

 

(Great CSN song, by the way.)

 

Hey! I STILL wanna be Cary Grant, dude, but I'm stuck with this mug HERE...and I'm wrinklin' it up more and more each day, it now seems!

 

(...btw...good luck with your search...and, you DO know why I did that "Judy X3" Cary joke in your thread here, doncha?...it's 'cause Cary calls out to Rita Hayworth's character "Judy, Judy" in one of the scenes, and then a few years later and after seeing this in that movie, some PROFESSIONAL smarta$$ started doin' his Cary Grant impression by saying "Judy, Judy, Judy" while doin' it...but yeah, you probably already knew this, didn't ya) ;)  

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Hey! I STILL wanna be Cary Grant, dude, but I'm stuck with this mug HERE...and I'm wrinklin' it up more and more each day, it now seems!

 

(...btw...good luck with your search...and, you DO know why I did that "Judy X3" Cary joke in your thread here, doncha?...it's 'cause Cary calls out to Rita Hayworth's character "Judy, Judy" in one of the scenes, and then a few years later and after seeing this in that movie, some PROFESSIONAL smarta$$ started doin' his Cary Grant impression by saying "Judy, Judy, Judy" while doin' it...but yeah, you probably already knew this, didn't ya) ;)  

 

I got it, but all of my snappy replies had already gone to bed for the evening. :angry: I just had to make do with my "Everybody wants to be Cary ..." reference.

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Every time I watch this film, I remember how much I liked it the last time I watched it.

 

Richard Barthelmess gave a great, subtle performance, almost exclusively with his eyes.

 

Does anyone know anything about the performer who sang Adiós Mariquita Linda at approximately 1:54:39 into the film?

 

 

This is the best version of this song I have ever heard: simple, unaffected, heartfelt. He is listed in the credits as Maciste, and on IMDB as Manuel Álvarez Maciste, and elsewhere on the web as Manuel Álvarez Rentería Maciste. But beyond a small web page in Spanish (which I ran through Google Translator), I wasn’t able to find out much more about him. He apparently appeared in several Hollywood films.

 

Kid Dabb, I’m looking in your direction.

There appear to have been some radio broadcasts that were available at one time for streaming here.. but no more.

 

Manuel Alvarez "Maciste" - - a.k.a. Manuel Alvarez Renteria (birth name), Maciste A. Alvarez, Alvarez Maciste, Mafiste Alvarez, Alvarez Macister, MA Maciste, M. Alvarez, M. Alvarez poppies Maciste MA, Alvarez Ml Maciste, Maciste, Magister, Manuel M. Maciste Manuel Maciste, S. Alvarez
 
Birthdate (Death): Tequila, Jalisco. 1892 (1960) Manuel Álvarez (Maciste) Manuel Álvarez Renteria, "Maciste", was a native of Tequila, Jalisco, where he was born, on August 8, 1892. Since childhood showed an extraordinary love to play guitar, and finally succeeded through studies conducted in the city of Mérida, Yucatán. His professional activities as a guitarist and singer began in the city of Mexico, specializing in singing tangos. Some of his early material: The first was "Red Eye", which was followed by many more, of which among others, "The Golfa", "Paris", "See how you speak", "White Hands", etc., but the most known and famous of his repertoire are "Angelitos Negros", "Virgin of Talpa" and "Spare me heart" (Trio Los Delfines).
 
He ventured further in American cinema, performing in several Hollywood films, including The Firefly ("Ojos Rojos" - arranged and performed by Manuel Alvarez Maciste), Only Angels Have Wings, Viva Villa, The Audacity of Paul Bragaza and so on. On his return to the homeland, national cinema incorporated him into their ranks, debuting with the film La hora de la verdad, where he sang his production, "Farewell of a Torero" dedicated to Guadalajara, Pepe Ortiz. He worked many, long years on the radio, and its programs premiered many of his compositions, and for more than three consecutive years, singing every night, said his series, "A guitar in the night ", which was transmitted through signal XEW Source: http://www.radio.udg.mx/pagina/fonografo/bioa.htm  - - now unavailable.
 
It appears he died October 13, 1960 - Mexico City
 
His first successes were achieved in the famous Politeama batches, alternating with Agustín Lara and Luis Arcaraz. He was an actor of national cinema and also in the US. In addition to "Black Angels" that gained him fame outside his borders, he composed over two hundred songs, of which are highlighted: "Red Eye", "Advice to women", "Three Hearts", "Do not speak ill of woman","A Year Without You""For tapatías""See how you talk",  "Spare me heart" and above all "imploring" which was also known as "Virgin of Talpa".
 
Heres a small article from La Ruta Del Tequila
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