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Yes,.it was the first episode when they finally arrive in Hollywood after driving cross country ("Hollywood At.Last"?). Ricky has to go to MGM, so the others decide to go hunting for movie stars at their watering hole, The Brown Derby Restaurant. Walter Pidgeon and Ava Gardner, among others, are.paged. Lucy and Ethel can't figure out if there is a charicature of Judy Holliday or Shelley Winters, so Lucy asks the blonde in the next booth which of the two it is; she responds acidly, "Neither, it's Eve Arden"....it IS Eve Arden who answered. Later Wm. Holden sits in the next booth; Lucy cannot keep from staring snd peeking. Holden decides to turn the tables, and stares at.her while she tries to eat her spaghetti. She is so flustered she has to leave, and bumps into a waiter who tips a full sheet cske on Holden. Later, he comes to the hotel room with Ricky; Lucy attempts to disguise herself with a fake moldable nose.

 

It is hilarious, and is rightly considered a classic episode.

 

Yep, probably considered the best of the "Hollywood" episodes alright, Arturo. However, for "some strange reason", MY personal favorite of them was always THIS one...but don't ask me why... ;)

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A35CAtLo664

 

(...what a beautiful rendition of "Take Me Out To The Ballgame", eh?!)

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Yep, probably considered the best of the "Hollywood" episodes alright, Arturo. However, for "some strange reason", MY personal favorite of them was always THIS one...but don't ask me why... ;)

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A35CAtLo664

 

(...what a beautiful rendition of "Take Me Out To The Ballgame", eh?!)

Harpo's rendition of "Take Me Out to the Ballgame" is amazing.  I also loved all Lucy's "celebrity impressions" with the big rubber masks.  Hilarious and awful.  Carolyn Appleby's eyesight must have been really bad.  It is also the only episode that mentions Carolyn's terrible eyesight.  She must wear contacts in other episodes, lol.

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I love "I Love Lucy," especially the Hollywood episodes.  They're some of the best of the series.  She also encounters movie stars in other places.  She meets Charles Boyer in Paris and Bob Hope and Orson Welles after Ricky buys the Tropicana Club and renames it "Club Babalu."  If you include all the hour long specials, she meets a star in each one. 

 

My favorites are:

 

1) The aforementioned "Hollywood at Last!" episode, which is also known as "L.A. at Last!"  It is hilarious.  I love the scene between Lucy and William Holden at the Brown Derby.  The highlight though is definitely when Lucy sports her fake nose in an effort to disguise her identity.  Ricky met Holden at the studio and Holden volunteered to give Ricky a ride home.  The funniest scene, in my opinion, are the looks on Ricky and Holden's faces after Lucy re-molds her nose and makes it long and pointy.  Desi Arnaz, hands down, has the greatest enraged/shocked face of all time. 

 

2) The episode "The Star Upstairs." Lucy has met 99 movie stars and is determined to meet one more to make an even 100.  An item in the newspaper hints at Cornel Wilde hiding out in one of the hotels with the word "Beverly" in the name.  Lucy and Ethel immediately assume it's their hotel-- The Beverly Palms.  Bobby the bellboy lets it slip that the girls' assumptions are correct.  Lucy, with Bobby's help, manages to get into Wilde's hotel room.  It is located directly above the Ricardo's room.  She hides and is subsequently trapped.  Not wanting Wilde to find her, she tries to lower herself to her balcony--with Ethel's help.  The highlight of the episode is Lucy hanging from her makeshift towel rope from the balcony and Ethel's desperate attempts to distract Ricky from seeing Lucy dangling in front of the window.  Ethel pushes Ricky onto the couch and frantically recites a cake recipe to him.  She sees Lucy fall and quickly rushes out saying that she "hates to eat and run (even though she and Ricky didn't eat) and has to go pick up a friend."

 

3) "The Fashion Show."  Lucy desperately wants a Don Loper original dress.  She manages to get Ricky to agree to buy her one.  He gives her a $100 budget.  Lucy and Ethel go to Loper's boutique to shop and Lucy, not wanting to let on that she doesn't shop in boutiques all the time, ends up buying a dress (and having it tailored) without looking at the price tag.  When she gets home, she looks at the price tag-- $500.  She cannot return it due to the tailoring.  She ends up back at the salon and overhears Sheila MacRae talking to Don Loper about a charity fashion show being put on by Hollywood wives-- Mrs. William Holden, Mrs. Richard Carlson, Mrs. Forrest Tucker, Mrs. Dean Martin and Mrs. Van Heflin are all participating.  MacRae and Loper are in a conundrum, because another Hollywood wife (that was slated to participate) drops out.  Lucy not so subtly makes a phone call stating that she's "Mrs. Ricky Ricardo, wife of the movie star, Ricky Ricardo."  MacRae overhears and offers Lucy a spot in the show.  Loper offers to give Lucy the dress she purchased if she'll wear another of his creations.  Lucy of course, agrees.  With her new role as model, Lucy decides to get some sun hoping to tan a little.  She ends up falling asleep in the sun and is burned, however she won't let a severe burn stop her.  The next day, at the fashion show, Lucy ends up modeling a tweed suit.  You can feel the pain just watching her walk up the steps.  Lucy finishes her spot in the show and gets her Loper original.

 

4) "In Palm Springs."  This one was mentioned earlier, it guest stars Rock Hudson.  The Ricardos and Mertzes start getting on one another's nerves and decide to spend a weekend apart.  Lucy and Ethel go to a hotel in Palm Springs and Fred and Ricky stay in Hollywood.  Both Palm Springs and Hollywood are pouring down rain, so both parties are stuck inside.  The girls miss the boys and vice versa.  Of course, neither party wants to admit it.  Lucy and Ethel end up meeting Rock Hudson outside of the pool (after the rain disappeared).  Ricky, knowing that Rock Hudson was staying at the same place as the girls ends up contacting him to have Hudson tell Lucy and Ethel a fake sad story about a woman who let her husband's annoying habits (the very thing that caused the men and women to fight in the first place) get to her and caused her to take drastic measures.  Lucy, disguising her voice and pretending to be Dore Schary's secretary, calls Ricky to Palm Springs to discuss a movie.  Ricky, Fred, Lucy and Ethel are reunited at the end. 

 

My favorite two lines from this episode come from Ethel:

ETHEL (to Rock Hudson): Would you like a piece of Rock, Mr. Candy?

 

ETHEL: I'm getting a little sick and tired of being called a cow!

 

5) "The Dancing Star."  This episode is kind of a two-parter with the Harpo Marx episode.  Carolyn Appleby is in town (on her way to Hawaii) and decides to drop in on Lucy.  Lucy has been sending Appleby and other friends back in NYC postcards telling tall tales about all the celebrity parties she goes to and all the new Hollywood friends she's made.  Carolyn, for two episodes only, has very bad eyesight and cannot see two feet in front of her face without her glasses.  Lucy, hearing that Carolyn is on her way to the hotel, freaks out because she's been telling Carolyn all these stories (which obviously are untrue).  Ethel tells Lucy that Van Johnson is asleep by the pool.  Lucy goes down to the pool (with Carolyn and Ethel supposedly looking on through a window) and pretends to have a conversation with sleeping Van.  Lucy comes back and it turns out Carolyn didn't see anything because she lost her glasses.  Of course, Lucy being Lucy, doesn't know when to stop and tells Carolyn about a big Hollywood party she's hosting in a couple days (this ends up being all the "celebrity drop-ins" in the Harpo Marx episode).  Lucy suggests Ethel take Lucy down to Johnson's practice as Johnson's partner bears a passing resemblance to Lucy.  Without her glasses, Carolyn wouldn't be able to tell the difference.The airline finds Carolyn's glasses and now Lucy's really in a pickle.  Knowing that Van Johnson is doing a show at the hotel, she rushes down to his practice to beg him to let her be in the show.  Johnson, of course, says no, but then agrees after Lucy flatters him by saying she has seen the show 14 times and knows the whole act.  Carolyn and Ethel see the act and it would seem all is well.   Later, Johnson calls Lucy asking her to help him out because his partner is sick.  This is one of the few episodes where Lucy is able to perform a musical routine without purposely or inadvertently messing something up. 

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I guess I'm a little bit like Lucy when it comes to meeting celebrities. I have this ability to recognize them in public and my friends can't believe it. No, I don't go bonkers getting autographs I usually let them have their privacy. Of course if it is unavoidable I would say "Nice to see you--------" and often it is an acknowledged smile or nod.

Your friends can't believe that you can recognize celebrities? Sounds like your friends have spent most of their lives under a rock, if they can't.

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Those "trip to Hollywood" episodes were fun, I'll admit.  But many of my favorites were before AND after...

 

I don't know the NAMES of the episodes, and don't really care...

 

But one of them involved Desi, as Ricky, trying to read a bedtime story to "little Ricky" and botching up the English.  For example, he pronounced the word "through" as "throwg".  Lucy corrects him by telling him it's pronounced "Throo".  So, the next word he encounters is "tough", which, in remembering the previous word, he pronounces "too".  When told it's pronounced "tuff", he presses on, comes to the word "Bough" and says "buff".  THEN he's told THAT word is pronounced "bow" as in "bow down".  So, finally, when the word "bought" is pronounced, by Ricky, as BOWT, he gets corrected again, and by HIS time,he's finally had enough, throws down the book in disgust and let's loos a string of probably profane spanish, starting with his signature, "Aiee Yi. yi, yi, YI!"

 

Desi's most hilarious performance was when he was on Saturday Night Live in a "Poetry Corner" sketch trying to read Lewis Caroll's "Jaberwocky".  Anyone whoever tried to read that poem will see the hilarity in the idea of Arnaz giving it a reading!

 

 

Sepiatone

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I think the dancing star one was with Van Johnson, because Lucy and Van dance at the end of it. The episode you are thinking of is simply called 'Lucy and Harpo Marx.'

 

"The Dancing Star" is the name of the episode with Van Johnson.  However, it is a two-parter with the 'Harpo Marx' episode.  Carolyn Appleby is enroute to Hawaii and she decides to stop in LA to visit Lucy and attend one of the Hollywood parties that Lucy brags about.  The plot that I described below is what happens in the Van Johnson episode.  In this episode, after Carolyn mentions that she lost her glasses, Lucy says it's a shame because she's having a big Hollywood party later that week.  After Carolyn sees Lucy and Van dancing, Lucy thinks she's safe.  Carolyn will be leaving for Hawaii and will be able to go back to NYC and tell everyone about seeing Lucy with Van Johnson.  After Lucy helps Van out by filling in for his partner, she is surprised to see Carolyn in the wings after the performance.  Carolyn tells her that she convinced her husband to go onto Hawaii without her (she'll take a later plane) and now she can meet all the stars that Lucy was promising were going to attend her big Hollywood party. 

 

In "Lucy and Harpo Marx," Lucy is trying to figure out how to produce all these celebrities for the party so that Carolyn doesn't find out what a liar Lucy is.  Lucy and Ethel manage to get Carolyn's glasses away from her and that's when Lucy puts on all the celebrity masks and does her celebrity impressions for Carolyn.  Ricky and Fred meet Harpo down at the pool and wanting to help Lucy out, Ricky asks Harpo to do him a favor and head up to their room (Room 315) and pay Lucy, Ethel and Carolyn a visit.  Harpo happily obliges.  He then plays "Take Me Out to the Ballgame" on his harp for Carolyn and Ethel.  Lucy, doing her next celebrity impression as Harpo, is hiding behind a partition.  Harpo sees Lucy and they then re-enact the famous mirror routine from "Duck Soup."  Carolyn, needing to catch her flight to Hawaii, announces she needs to leave, Ethel "miraculously" finds Carolyn's glasses and Harpo carries Carolyn out of the room.

 

For some reason, they filmed the Harpo Marx episode first, but the storyline of the Van Johnson episode clearly takes place before the Harpo Marx one.  Perhaps Harpo had some scheduling conflicts or something.

 

Sepiatone: The only reason I used the episode titles is that I've seen every episode a gazillion times (and have the entire series on DVD) and have a bunch of books about "I Love Lucy," so for whatever reason, I just know the episode titles.  I'm to I Love Lucy what others are to Star Trek

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garywithduesenberg.jpg

 

And here's Gary Cooper..ahem.."puttin' on the ritz" next to his 1930 Model J Duesenberg.

 

...and...

 

Who is this cool dude behind those Foster Grants and sitting in his 1956 Jaguar XKSS ?

 

jaguar-xkss-steve-mcqueen-hq.jpg

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Yeah, Top....same thing happened to a couple of STAR THEATER complex's in my area.  The one in Lincoln Park's Sears Shopping center was poorly maintained( the last movie I went to see in THAT theater was TITANIC, and in certain well lit scenes a big splotch on the screen was apparent.).  It closed down a mere six years after it opened.  The one in Taylor Michigan closed earlier THIS year due to, some assert, it's getting it's butt kicked by a neighboring city's MJR theater with better sound and "stadium seating".  THAT Star was around for nearly twenty years, though.  They closed it reportedly to make repairs and improvements, but it was decided midstream to just keep it closed and now I think it's scheduled for demolition.  There's talk of re-opening a theater complex across the street in the Southland Mall, which DID have, for years, a movie theater inside, but shut it down soon after the aforementioned STAR theater was opened. 

 

 

Sepiatone

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Ya know TB, all I could think of while reading your lament about this now gone movie theater of which you had cherished memories, was this famous quote by one F. Scott Fitzgerald:

 

"There are no second acts in American lives."

 

(...kind'a fitting here especially, wouldn't ya say?!) ;)

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Never heard of Star Theaters. In California, we had those AMC-20s (with twenty screening rooms inside one gigantic multiplex). In Arizona, it was a smaller chain called Harkins Theatres. I think the one here in Wisconsin was probably locally owned.

 

Don't know when you moved to SoCal, TB, but one of the largest theater chains in that region(and my old stompin' grounds, of course) during the 1970s was owned by the General Cinema Corporation at the time.

 

I remember the following GCC intro(in fact, the little ditty's tune is still firmly embedded within my skull to this day) being shown on the screen before every movie I ever watched in those multiplexes during that decade, and of which most have now either been razed or were purchased by other theater chains since GCC folded their operations sometime in the early-2000s....

 

 

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In Salem, we have Regal (which I think used to be ACT III theaters, but Regal purchased them).  The old Drive-In closed in the early 90s (I think the last film I saw there was Wayne's World) and it was torn down and an 11 screen Regal Cinemas was built in its place.  It opened in I believe '98 or '99.  The first film I saw there was the second Austin Powers movie.  It is still operating and has been maintained or perhaps recently remodeled.  I just saw White Christmas there in fact.  It was a big deal when it opened up because it was the first theater to have stadium seating.

 

As a result of Regal opening, the theaters with non-stadium seating saw a decline in ticket sales.  We had two smaller theaters in town, a 4 screen and a 7 screen, that didn't have stadium seating.  Their original incarnations closed long ago but a theater still operates in both locations.  The 4-screen theater has removed seating and replaced the spaces with tables.  You can now order food and a beer to consume while you watch your movie.  This theater shows second-run films.  The 7-screen uses the same food/beer concept, but they show first run films.  We also had another 4 screen theater that was part of the mall across town.  I remember when I was little that that was the last place you wanted to go because the theater was dirty and the floors were really sticky.  However, they did show first run films, but the theater was gross.  The theater closed in the mid 00s and was torn down.  A few years ago Regal opened a new 11-screen theater opened in its place (and the place of other businesses on that side of the mall).  This is now the theater to go to for first run films. 

 

I remember going to the theater back in the day and if you wanted to see a new movie, you usually had to send someone down to the theater earlier in the day to pick up tickets--otherwise, the film would be sold out.  Nowadays, the theater would be lucky to sell 20 tickets to a film.  I haven't been to a packed theater in years.  Strangely enough, the last movie I have been to that was actually sold out was TCM's re-release of Singin' in the Rain a couple years ago. 

 

I like Cinemark Theaters (which are up in Portland) better than Regal Cinemas.  It's a little cheaper and the theaters are just as nice. 

 

There is also something to be said for seeing a movie in a renovated old theater or even going to the independent theaters.  There is something a little more intimate about the experience.

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I like Cinemark Theaters (which are up in Portland) better than Regal Cinemas.  It's a little cheaper and the theaters are just as nice. 

 

 

 

I was at a Cinemark multiplex in the Chicago burbs last night. It has 12 theaters and also 6 CineArts screens that show foreign and independent films.

The theater we went to was nearly full.

 

PS. I agree with you about movie theaters with sticky floors. YUCK!!!!!

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Never been to one of those, Dargo. Moved to Los Angeles for college in 1991 and stayed in the greater L.A. area until 2004.

 

Usually AMC theatres (one in Burbank and one in Century City). Or sometimes I'd go to the Cineplex Odeon at Universal City.

 

I'll bet you probably attended a few movies at the Nuart (revival house) Theater at the intersection of Santa Monica and Sawtelle Blvds in West L.A. though, right?!

 

(...I saw many a classic, documentary and art house film there over the years)

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Yes, I certainly did. Thanks for reminding me about that place! Great times.

 

I saw some art house films there and a friend of mine who made a low-budget independent feature had her work screened there, too.

 

You're welcome.

 

Some of the films I especially remember seeing there was REAR WINDOW when it was first re-released after many years, and then there was the documentary about the 1939 NY World's Fair titled THE WORLD OF TOMORROW (1984), and a very interesting little art house surrealistic thriller titled "π"(aka "Pi")(1998).

 

(...yep, it was/is a great little movie house to watch movies for the out-of-the-mainstream crowd, alright)

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Never heard of Star Theaters. In California, we had those AMC-20s (with twenty screening rooms inside one gigantic multiplex). In Arizona, it was a smaller chain called Harkins Theatres. I think the one here in Wisconsin was probably locally owned.

I think the Star theaters WERE part of the AMC corp. chain, if memory serves, but all of THEM were called "Star" theaters in my area.  But I DO seem to recall AMC being stamped on all the popcorn cartons!

 

Now, the MJR multiplex in neighboring Southgate, Mi is the closest theater for movie to where I live.  The two closest MALLS that used to have multi-screened theaters have closed THEM down, and the only OTHER multi-screened theater near me is in next door ALLEN PARK, which is STILL the only "DOLLAR SHOW" operating in the immediate vicinity.

 

It's certainly NOT like the OLD days, when a neighborhood family theater, when hit by hard times, would switch to showing PORN just to keep operating as a MOVIE THEATER!    NOW they just shutter them, tear them down and put up WAL-MARTS!

 

 

Sepiatone

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Actually TB, as was discussed in that "It's a Wonderful Life" thread the other day, Capra was often quite the "walking contradiction" in terms of the ideas and ideals he brought to many of his films and in contrast to what his personal beliefs seemed to be.

 

In this I mean, while he may have often put forth the thoughts of a "Progressive minded" man in his films, he actually was a very traditional and Conservative one in terms of his politics and his thoughts upon "the social order of things"...and as I mentioned in that other thread, possibly due to his strong Catholic faith.

 

And so, in the case of "Mr. Smith" here and the apparent lack of any "progressive thought" expressed within it that would run counter to the traditional thought that "a woman's place be confined to the duties of the home and family", and which of course WAS the generally accepted norm of that era, I would guess that once again Capra's personal views might have subtly and maybe even subconsciously seeped into his final product.

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There HAVE been imes when a critic I respect gave a new movie a bad review, and it caused me to NOT go and see that movie,

 

 

Sepiatone

 

About the only time I paid attention to reviews was in the 60s and 70s BEFORE I paid good money to see a film in a theater. I avoided dozens of movies because they were just not my type of movies. Now they occasionally turn up on TCM and they are still not my kind of movies.

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