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I'm a little confused...i keep clicking on a luise rainer thread only to find every subject on earth discussed but luise rainer...is the idea that the title and topic changes and no one has chimed in on rainer yet or is everyone messing with the op?

Yes, and yes, Lorna.

 

But by all means, let's get it back on topic. 

 

I never knew I didn't like Luise Rainer as much as I don't.

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I'm a little confused...i keep clicking on a luise rainer thread only to find every subject on earth discussed but luise rainer...is the idea that the title and topic changes and no one has chimed in on rainer yet or is everyone messing with the op?

We've discussed this earlier in the thread, Lorna. The thread is actually called Today's Topic. But each day, the topic is updated. So yes, we are now on Luise Rainer. 

 

If you will look back in the thread (around page 3), you should find an index that lists the daily topics.

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Aaaah okay.

I dunno though, maybe its too soon since her passing for me to discuss my opinions on Mamselle Rainer...doubt they'd be much appreciated anyway.

!!!

 

Not at all. Look around, anything goes here. If you have an opinion, this is the place to share it.

 

Are you enjoying her day?

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!!!

 

Not at all. Look around, anything goes here. If you have an opinion, this is the place to share it.

 

Are you enjoying her day?

Actually kind of...i caught the end of "taxi driver" (sic?) (The one where she costars with Tracy) and the fight scene at the end with the cameo by Jack Dempsey and a jaw dropping moment where two black guys in tuxes flip a coin over who gets to punch out a white guy was a total "omg i cant believe they did THAT in 193? " moment.

 

You just KNOW they didnt show that anywhere below Maryland when it came out.

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Catching up on Luise Rainer films today. Really enjoying her.

 

So  far, the most "fun" film I've watched was BIG CITY (1937).

I really enjoyed the chemistry between Luise and Spencer Tracy. Luise was so cute and her "acting" so spontaneous, they appeared to be really enjoying each other. And watching them interact made me smile a lot :)

 

In most of the other films she seems typecast into the "long suffering wife" role like she played  in the second half of "The Great Ziegfeld" (1936). Though I have enjoyed her interaction with William Powell, as well, with Tracy in BIG CITY it was like watching a loving couple that  really enjoyed playing games and each others company.  

 

R.O. said in his intro that Germany was her native country? I always thought she was French?

 

Anyhooo, hope she is having a great time watching herself on TCM today, whereever she is.

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Glad to see they had Robert O. film some new wraparounds for Luise this morning. Gives it more than just a typical birthday tribute feel. Nicely done!

Yes, but it was rather tacky to repeat the exact same wraparound before every film.  Surely RO could have taken the time to say something specific (even briefly) about the film which was about to be aired while he was in taping this "memorial specific"

wraparound.   

 

Lydecker

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Catching up on Luise Rainer films today. Really enjoying her.

 

So  far, the most "fun" film I've watched was BIG CITY (1937).

I really enjoyed the chemistry between Luise and Spencer Tracy. Luise was so cute and her "acting" so spontaneous, they appeared to be really enjoying each other. And watching them interact made me smile a lot :)

 

In most of the other films she seems typecast into the "long suffering wife" role like she played  in the second half of "The Great Ziegfeld" (1936). Though I have enjoyed her interaction with William Powell, as well, with Tracy in BIG CITY it was like watching a loving couple that  really enjoyed playing games and each others company.  

 

R.O. said in his intro that Germany was her native country? I always thought she was French?

 

Anyhooo, hope she is having a great time watching herself on TCM today, whereever she is.

I thought she was from Austria, but I guess it was Germany. I completely agree about her working with Spence. I wish they had done more films together. In a way, I think she's a better fit for him than Hepburn (no tomatoes please). Like you said, very natural chemistry and two double Oscar honorees getting it done, with talent to spare. 

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Yes, but it was rather tacky to repeat the exact same wraparound before every film.  Surely RO could have taken the time to say something specific (even briefly) about the film which was about to be aired while he was in taping this "memorial specific"

wraparound.   

 

Lydecker

Yes, Lydecker, I noticed that as well, after I made my earlier post. One of the films ran over--THE EMPEROR'S CANDLESTICKS-- because of the repeated intro.

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Amnesia in the movies

 

https://oforinvolvingmotionpictures.wordpress.com/2015/01/12/amnesia-in-the-movies/

 

A few times every month the focus of this column will be a specific movie keyword. Today I have selected amnesia as the keyword, though I forget the reason why. Maybe when my memory full returns I will be able to tell you. Kidding aside, I chose this topic because it occurred to me that the depiction of memory loss is treated both humorously and seriously in classic films and with varying degrees of success. 

imgres-17.jpg

One film that TCM airs a few times every year is a 1939 romantic comedy entitled REMEMBER?, directed by Norman Z. McLeod. It stars Greer Garson in one of her very first motion picture assignments at MGM, as well as Robert Taylor and Lew Ayres. I think this is a great title for a rom-com, and the premise is quite good. Why? Well, because couples that have been together for a long time might possibly struggle to recall what brought them together (and will keep them together) during the more challenging periods of their relationship. 

 

In this film, the writers are exploring the sillier aspects of memory loss, so we have the couple in question experience rough times then use a drug that will conveniently help them forget all of that. Of course, since it's a comedy, they also happen to forget they were ever married and must fall in love all over again. Far fetched? Yes, but it works to a degree.

images10.jpg

Another film with this plot device that works much better, and also stars Greer Garson, is the romantic drama RANDOM HARVEST. This time, Greer falls for dashing Ronald Colman, who has forgotten his identity during the war. As he recovers, they fall in love. But their happiness is thwarted when he suffers a fateful accident that restores his memory and takes him back to his old life. The rest of the narrative hinges on whether or not he will be able to recall his love for Greer again. Since it is not played for laughs, the conflicts experienced by the amnesiac seem even more complicated and harrowing. In case someone hasn't seen RANDOM HARVEST yet, I will not spoil the ending and say whether or not the couple happily reunites.

imgres9.jpg

One amnesia-themed movie that may not have a traditional happy ending is MISTER BUDDWING, produced by MGM in 1966. This was a dramatic role for James Garner, often known for his lighter performances in comedies and westerns. In the story, he plays a man who calls himself Buddwing (in fact, we do not even find out his real name). He spends the rest of the film's 100-minute running time trying to solve the mystery of who he is, and why he keeps remembering a woman named Grace. Delbert Mann is the director, and Jean Simmons plays a blonde who may or may not be Grace.

 

While much of MISTER BUDDWING is told in an ambiguous style, it is nevertheless engrossing drama. And perhaps more effectively than RANDOM HARVEST, we see the torment a man goes through trying to own his past and reclaim his life. The film is told largely from a first-person point of view, and the frustration and confusion he undergoes seems very real to the audience.

images11.jpg

Obviously, not every film tackling this subject matter is going to be successful. But amnesia in the movies is a plot device that tends to draw us in as viewers. It presents a great, dynamic what-if. What if the notions of how we define ourselves were suddenly wiped out? What if we had to rebuild our entire existence all over? Would there be a satisfying conclusion?

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What is more pathetic is quoting and replying to one's own post.  

To be fair, others have done that too. I know I have quoted and replied on some of my earlier comments, if there was some point of clarification I wanted to add without retyping everything. Sometimes you don't want to go back and add to the other comment in case people have already read it and the thread has since added a few pages.

 

In this case, however, I believe the poster was just trying to be spiteful. She earned some warnings points this morning for her responses in various threads. The mod is watching her.

 

Let's move on now...

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I wonder if Amnesia was ever REALLY depicted in any movie.  Usually, in both movies and television shows, it's caused by a huge psycological shock or a blow to the head.  And all that happens is someone forgets who he/she is, or where they are, etc.  From what I read about REAL amnesia,it's a very frightening condition.  Yes, you forget who you are, but you can't TELL anybody, because you can't also remember how to talk.  And you forget everything to the point that someone talking to you can't be understood because you forgot THAT, too!  It'd be great to run away, but you frogot how to WALK, EAT on your own, or any BAHROOM training you recieved as a toddler.  You'd HAVE to be put back in diapers!

 

In other words,TRUE amnesia mentally( and in some ways, physically) reverts you back to the status of a newborn.

I imagine( I would at least HOPE) that there ARE varying levels of degrees of this infliction, and no doubt, if there CAN be, it is one of THOSE levels that are displayed in movies and television plays.

 

 

Sepiatone

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I had a few films in mind, but I forgot what they were.

Another film I could have included in the comedy section is the William Powell Myrna Loy confection I LOVE YOU AGAIN. It's where Powell gets amnesia and turns into a nicer guy-- such a nice guy in fact, that it makes his estranged wife suddenly want to reconcile with him!

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I wonder if Amnesia was ever REALLY depicted in any movie.  Usually, in both movies and television shows, it's caused by a huge psycological shock or a blow to the head.  And all that happens is someone forgets who he/she is, or where they are, etc.  From what I read about REAL amnesia,it's a very frightening condition.  Yes, you forget who you are, but you can't TELL anybody, because you can't also remember how to talk.  And you forget everything to the point that someone talking to you can't be understood because you forgot THAT, too!  It'd be great to run away, but you frogot how to WALK, EAT on your own, or any BAHROOM training you recieved as a toddler.  You'd HAVE to be put back in diapers!

 

In other words,TRUE amnesia mentally( and in some ways, physically) reverts you back to the status of a newborn.

I imagine( I would at least HOPE) that there ARE varying levels of degrees of this infliction, and no doubt, if there CAN be, it is one of THOSE levels that are displayed in movies and television plays.

 

 

Sepiatone

Not trying to over-interpret your response here, Sepia-- but I get the impression you see it is as a plot contrivance in movies and TV shows. Like without much believability. Is that right?

 

One thing I like about MR. BUDDWING is that all he has are clues and they still don't amount to much in terms of recovering his identity. 

 

What about films where a character fakes amnesia...? Now that's something else altogether!

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Movie star investments

 

I am sure not all movie stars in studio era Hollywood were making the really big bucks. But those that did often parlayed their financial success into other businesses. These businesses tended to be for the most part outside the motion picture industry. Maybe it was a chance to repay a favor to a friend who had helped them on the way up. Maybe it was a way to go into business with a relative who could benefit from the start-up capital given them. Or maybe it was the idea that if movie offers suddenly dried up, there was something to fall back on.

 

Whatever the reason, there are plenty of examples how stars invested their extra money. Take a look (some of them may just surprise you):

1flowersho.png

In the 1940s, Judy Garland decided to take some of her MGM earnings and buy a flower shop. Fellow studio contract player Lucille Ball also invested in a flower shop.

Long-time Warner Brothers star Pat O'Brien nixed the flower shop idea. Instead, he bought his wife a dress and hat shop. She managed it while he reported to work at the studio.

1hatdress.png
There must have been something about owning a shop. Even Eddie Cantor got in on it. Except he didn’t buy a flower shop or a dress and hat shop. His idea was to purchase an antiques shop. Can you imagine going inside to buy a grandfather clock or an old oak table, and Eddie Cantor is on the other side of the cash register?

Meanwhile, Irene Dunne had a substantial investment in the Beverly Hills Hotel. This was probably not far from Eddie’s antiques shop. On the other side of town, one might find Victor Mature’s furniture store.

screen-shot-2015-01-13-at-6-05-14-pm.png

The next one surprises me. Are you ready? George Brent invested in a supermarket. Yes, a supermarket. Attention customers, that spill on aisle 8 will be cleaned up by the star of DARK VICTORY.
screen-shot-2015-01-13-at-6-07-15-pm.png
Some stars liked to invest in property used to grow crops. For instance, Edward Arnold owned and supervised a large orange grove. And Walter Brennan owned a 12,000 acre ranch in Oregon. Not far from the Brennan place, Ginger Rogers owned a thousand-acre dairy farm.
pennsylvania-dairy-farm.jpg
Some business ventures seem to go together. Billie Burke was the owner of a salad dressing company; while ZaSu Pitts had a ranch where she grew lettuce and tomatoes. I would have given anything to be invited over to the ZaSu Pitt's home for a fresh garden salad, topped with Billie Burke’s vinaigrette.

1tomato.png
Gary Cooper owned dude ranches in Idaho and Montana (he was originally from Montana). John Payne also had a lot of property in Montana-- Billings to be exact. A
nd did you know Cary Grant owned 1,200 acres in Brazil? I didn’t know, either. And don’t forget Alan Ladd. He was the proud owner of a...

1chicken-ranch.jpg

 

For more: 

https://oforinvolvingmotionpictures.wordpress.com/2015/01/14/movie-star-investments/

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Movie star investments

 

I am sure not all movie stars in studio era Hollywood were making the really big bucks. But those that did often parlayed their financial success into other businesses. These businesses tended to be for the most part outside the motion picture industry. Maybe it was a chance to repay a favor to a friend who had helped them on the way up. Maybe it was a way to go into business with a relative who could benefit from the start-up capital given them. Or maybe it was the idea that if movie offers suddenly dried up, there was something to fall back on.

 

Whatever the reason, there are plenty of examples how stars invested their extra money. Take a look (some of them may just surprise you):

1flowersho.png

In the 1940s, Judy Garland decided to take some of her MGM earnings and buy a flower shop. Fellow studio contract player Lucille Ball also invested in a flower shop.

 

Long-time Warner Brothers star Pat O'Brien nixed the flower shop idea. Instead, he bought his wife a dress and hat shop. She managed it while he reported to work at the studio.

1hatdress.png

There must have been something about owning a shop. Even Eddie Cantor got in on it. Except he didn’t buy a flower shop or a dress and hat shop. His idea was to purchase an antiques shop. Can you imagine going inside to buy a grandfather clock or an old oak table, and Eddie Cantor is on the other side of the cash register?

 

Meanwhile, Irene Dunne had a substantial investment in the Beverly Hills Hotel. This was probably not far from Eddie’s antiques shop. On the other side of town, one might find Victor Mature’s furniture store.

screen-shot-2015-01-13-at-6-05-14-pm.png

The next one surprises me. Are you ready? George Brent invested in a supermarket. Yes, a supermarket. Attention customers, that spill on aisle 8 will be cleaned up by the star of DARK VICTORY.

screen-shot-2015-01-13-at-6-07-15-pm.png

Some stars liked to invest in property used to grow crops. For instance, Edward Arnold owned and supervised a large orange grove. And Walter Brennan owned a 12,000 acre ranch in Oregon. Not far from the Brennan place, Ginger Rogers owned a thousand-acre dairy farm.

pennsylvania-dairy-farm.jpg

Some business ventures seem to go together. Billie Burke was the owner of a salad dressing company; while ZaSu Pitts had a ranch where she grew lettuce and tomatoes. I would have given anything to be invited over to the ZaSu Pitt's home for a fresh garden salad, topped with Billie Burke’s vinaigrette.

1tomato.png

Gary Cooper owned dude ranches in Idaho and Montana (he was originally from Montana). John Payne also had a lot of property in Montana-- Billings to be exact. And did you know Cary Grant owned 1,200 acres in Brazil? I didn’t know, either. And don’t forget Alan Ladd. He was the proud owner of a...

1chicken-ranch.jpg

 

For more: 

https://oforinvolvingmotionpictures.wordpress.com/2015/01/14/movie-star-investments/

Nobody should reply on any thread like this, which, for whatever reason, has had its title completely changed.

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Nobody should reply on any thread like this, which, for whatever reason, has had its title completely changed.

You are being petty. And you have posted twice on this thread today, an obvious sign you are not taking your own advice.

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