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The “White Lightning” Curse!!!


Wayne
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. . . as in the 1973 box office hit and Burt Reynolds actioner White Lightning.  On Friday, Dec. 19th, the film's producer Arthur Gardner died (at age 104!!).  Then Monday, Dec. 22nd, the film's director Joseph Sargent passed away.  Three days apart . . .

 

I'm tellin' ya' . . . IT'S A CURSE!!!  Is Ned Beatty next?!?!?!

 

 

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. . . as in the 1973 box office hit and Burt Reynolds actioner White Lightning.  On Friday, Dec. 19th, the film's producer Arthur Gardner died (at age 104!!).  Then Monday, Dec. 22nd, the film's director Joseph Sargent passed away.  Three days apart . . .

 

I'm tellin' ya' . . . IT'S A CURSE!!!  Is Ned Beatty next?!?!?!

 

 

 

Eeh! C'mon now here, Wayne! This whole "White Lightning Curse" thing is nothin' new at ALL, dude!

 

Nope, ya see, George Jones died over a YEAR ago now!...

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WE5pM1HXxlI

 

(...of course, he WAS 81 years old at the time...and the way he lived, it was amazing he lived THAT long!!!)

 

;)

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That's almost as eerie as the timing of the deaths of the two actors who played Henry Blake. On February 15, 1996, McLean Stevenson, who appeared as the Army lieutenant colonel in the long-running CBS sitcom version of "M*A*S*H," died of a heart attack. One day later, Roger Bowen, who played Blake in Robert Altman's 1970 film, died of a heart attack.

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DARREN McGAVIN and DON KNOTTS, who appeared in a couple of Disney movies together, died 1 day apart in 2006.  They were:  NO DEPOSIT, NO RETURN (1976) -and- HOT LEAD AND COLD FEET (1978).

 

    I knew Arthur Gardner had died at 104, but I didn't know Joseph Sargent had died yesterday.   

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. . . as in the 1973 box office hit and Burt Reynolds actioner White Lightning.  On Friday, Dec. 19th, the film's producer Arthur Gardner died (at age 104!!).  Then Monday, Dec. 22nd, the film's director Joseph Sargent passed away.  Three days apart . . .

 

I'm tellin' ya' . . . IT'S A CURSE!!!  Is Ned Beatty next?!?!?!

 

 

One man lives to 104 and the other to 89.  Unless these men had long illness issues I would hardly consider this a curse (we should all be cursed so).  WHITE LIGHTNING was a good Burt Reynolds film , before he got hooked on those dumb Smokey and the Bandit / Cannonball Run films (although they did a big box office turnout).  Sargent did mostly tv stuff, I  know he did some of the better MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E.  episodes.

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That's almost as eerie as the timing of the deaths of the two actors who played Henry Blake. On February 15, 1996, McLean Stevenson, who appeared as the Army lieutenant colonel in the long-running CBS sitcom version of "M*A*S*H," died of a heart attack. One day later, Roger Bowen, who played Blake in Robert Altman's 1970 film, died of a heart attack.

I remember seeing that one in the newspapers, something like that tends to stick in ones memory.  Another thing I remember about McLean,  he was often on the Carson Tonight show (I believe his future wife was on the show's staff) and the guy could really sing well.

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One man lives to 104 and the other to 89.  Unless these men had long illness issues I would hardly consider this a curse (we should all be cursed so).  WHITE LIGHTNING was a good Burt Reynolds film , before he got hooked on those dumb Smokey and the Bandit / Cannonball Run films (although they did a big box office turnout).  Sargent did mostly tv stuff, I  know he did some of the better MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E.  episodes.

 

I knew of Gardner's status as a member of the production team of Levy-Gardner-Laven, but I was unaware of his efforts during the blacklist era of the 1950s and early 1960s.

 

http://www.latimes.com/local/obituaries/la-me-arthur-gardner-20141221-story.html

 

 

Sargent was a distinguished director who won three Emmy Awards and was responsible for such feature films as "MacArthur" (1977, with Gregory Peck as the "American Caesar") and the original version of "The Taking of Pelham One Two Three" (1974). He also directed Abby Mann's Emmy Award-winning made-for-television movie "The Marcus-Nelson Murders," which was the genesis of the "Kojak" series that starred Telly Savalas.

 

http://www.latimes.com/local/obituaries/la-me-joseph-sargent-20141224-story.html

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