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Why do you think there are so many of the same movies repeated so often recently?


vic12
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It's usually a matter of cost. When a network negotiates for a film, the negotiated prices is for a number of showings. The more showings that price can be spread over, the  the less each one costs. The programming department has a  budget and they have to juggle the costs each month. If they have some costly premieres, then they may have to make it up with more cheaper repeats.

 

Another thing to keep in mind is that parent Time-Warner made major cuts and layoffs to it's television properties this year. I believe TCM escaped the layoffs, but I'll bet their budget got cut. So that means more repeats.

 

Still compared to other movie channels, TCM has far fewer repeats than say the Encore channels where they may run the same film eight or ten times within a month. Then there's Fox Movie channel which only runs commercial free classics about 10-12 hours a day and they just keep repeating the same 75 or 80 movies over and over and over.

 

 

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Wow!  After reading the responses, I didn't realize how naive about the process I've been.  I thought TCM, because it is affiliated with Turner, who had the full MGM archive, could show any of these whenever they wanted.  I'd forgotten about the Time Warner deal.  I guess we"re lucky to still have TCM at all.

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Wow!  After reading the responses, I didn't realize how naive about the process I've been.  I thought TCM, because it is affiliated with Turner, who had the full MGM archive, could show any of these whenever they wanted.  I'd forgotten about the Time Warner deal.  I guess we"re lucky to still have TCM at all.

vic12, search on North by Northwest.

 

Read about how happy everyone here is with the rate of showings on that movie.  :D

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Wow!  After reading the responses, I didn't realize how naive about the process I've been.  I thought TCM, because it is affiliated with Turner, who had the full MGM archive, could show any of these whenever they wanted.  I'd forgotten about the Time Warner deal.  I guess we"re lucky to still have TCM at all.

 

There are two many repeats on TCM but as others have noted less then other movie stations.   I have been watching the MOVIES station because they have Fox films that TCM doesn't show,  especially noir films.    But MOVIES has commercials and they do censor for content (which in most cases doesn't impact a Production code movie).     MOVIES also shows a lot more repeats.  Like a whole lot more.   e.g.  the same movie 2 or 3 times in one day and 5 or more times in a week.      

 

Still I wish that TCM would show more Fox films from the 40s and 50s and Columbia films from the 30s,  as well as Paramount movies from the studio-era.  

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I thought TCM, because it is affiliated with Turner, who had the full MGM archive, could show any of these whenever they wanted.

 

This is what I thought, too. TCM is supposed to have the rights to RKO and pre-50s Warner Bros. films, too (including the great early Popeye cartoons? Have they ever shown those?) With all other film companies aside, these three alone should have enough seldom-shown films in them to last for months without repeating. Don't tell me TCM has to pay even to show films from their own library?

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This is what I thought, too. TCM is supposed to have the rights to RKO and pre-50s Warner Bros. films, too (including the great early Popeye cartoons? Have they ever shown those?) With all other film companies aside, these three alone should have enough seldom-shown films in them to last for months without repeating. Don't tell me TCM has to pay even to show films from their own library?

If they do, it's far less than titles from Universal, Paramount and Fox. Though others will tell you that they do have to pay to show films from their own library, I think it's more creative bookkeeping-- they probably get credits from the parent company and are allowed so many of these films per month given the resources they must work with. Plus there are set funds to spend money on a few of those titles they want for special programming that are found outside the Turner Library.

 

I agree with you that there are plenty of MGM, RKO and WB programmers (plus the many Monogram and UA titles they have access to) that are played once every three or four years-- so putting GYPSY and NORTH BY NORTHWEST aside for a little while won't hurt. It will allow them to bring some of those other films back into rotation.

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So Many!

 

Christmas In Conneticut (sp)

 

I'll Be Seeing You

 

Marnie

 

The Man Who Came To Dinner.

 

It's driving me crazy!!!!!  I've been craving to see Rebecca for months now!!!!

 

Anyone else feel the same?

All of these (except Marnie) have Christmas settings or Christmas themes. Every December TCM usually does quite a few repeats of such films. These also include films such as Susan Slept Here, Shop Around the Corner, and Penny Serenade (the ending is at Christmas). Another December staple of TCM - picking a SOTM who is generally well liked  and who acted in a good helping of movies that had lighter themes. This year, of course, it's Cary Grant. In the past, off of the top of my head, I can remember Barbara Stanwyck, Mickey Rooney, and William Powell being SOTM during December.

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This is what I thought, too. TCM is supposed to have the rights to RKO and pre-50s Warner Bros. films, too (including the great early Popeye cartoons? Have they ever shown those?) With all other film companies aside, these three alone should have enough seldom-shown films in them to last for months without repeating. Don't tell me TCM has to pay even to show films from their own library?

 

First of all, let me just wish everyone out there today a wonderful and merry Christmas!!!

 

Not every film that is in a studio’s or distributer’s vaults are available to be leased or rented. There are literally thousands of films still sitting in their film canisters collecting dust that have not been opened in years. And there is simply not enough money being spent to make new digital masters of these older films and part of that is the economy and another part is that many of those in charge see no economic benefit to creating new digital masters.

 

The simple fact of the matter is that while many here bemoan the idea that there are so many films available to be shown on TCM, why isn't TCM doing more about showing all of these wonderful older films?

 

The reasons are complicated but they are also based in the economic reality we all live in today. Is there a market for these films and will people purchase these films if we (the studios and or distributors) can make a profit?

 

Since switching over to digital a few years back digital masters are needed to show the films that are shown on TCM now.

 

Back in early 2010, TCM online reported that of the 162,984 films listed in its database (based on the authoritative AFI Catalog), only 5,980 (3.67 percent) are available on home video. So what does this figure tell you?

 

According to other folks like the late Kyle in Hollywood and lzcutter here at the message boards:

 

"Contrary to what many believe here, TCM no longer owns the rights to broadcast films from the Turner Film Library. They must compete with other channels for the rights to broadcast the films. That library, which consists of the RKO film library, the pre-1949 Warners library and the pre-1986 MGM library, was included when Ted Turner merged his media empire with Time Warner back in the late 1990s.

 

Since then the former Turner film library has been under the ownership of Time Warner and under the care of Warner Brothers. It was posted here once that there were roughly 5,000 titles in the former Turner Film Library. Many of those films have yet to be transferred to a digital format mainly due to the sheer volume of films. Add to that, the post-1949 Warners film library that Warner Brothers owns will likely take a few more years (at least) for the majority of the titles to migrate from video masters to digital masters.

 

And there is speculation that not all the titles will be migrated."

 

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This is what I thought, too. TCM is supposed to have the rights to RKO and pre-50s Warner Bros. films, too (including the great early Popeye cartoons? Have they ever shown those?) With all other film companies aside, these three alone should have enough seldom-shown films in them to last for months without repeating. Don't tell me TCM has to pay even to show films from their own library?

I have been going through my DVD collection that I recorded off of TCM between 2006 to 2010 when their feed was analog and the films were video and the snap shot in time on what was on TCM is amazing. Rare RKO, Warner and MGM movies that haven't been on since. It seems like moving to digital has limited what they can use from the library. When Ted bought these films he created TNT in the late 80's to showcase them. I still have VHS recordings of movies from TNT that TCM has never shown, but that was 25 years ago when all transfers from film was to video.

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This is what I thought, too. TCM is supposed to have the rights to RKO and pre-50s Warner Bros. films, too (including the great early Popeye cartoons? Have they ever shown those?) With all other film companies aside, these three alone should have enough seldom-shown films in them to last for months without repeating. Don't tell me TCM has to pay even to show films from their own library?

 

The library is no longer owned nor controlled by Turner. It is now in Warner division of TimeWarner.

 

I have no inside information but I believe that there is goodwill between divisions of TimeWarner and that this facilitates negotiations but they are separate companies for purposes of daily operations. 

 

I believe strongly also that each division is much more concerned with their own bottom line than they are with giving other divisions massive discounts. This is due to profit/loss statements not containing line for how many times you were a good guy and division management stands or falls depending on how prosperous their division appears to be.

 

I feel this means that not only does TCM have to rent all titles but also that they can not expect to pay pennies for licenses for which other buyers would pay dollars.

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It's usually a matter of cost. When a network negotiates for a film, the negotiated prices is for a number of showings. The more showings that price can be spread over, the  the less each one costs. The programming department has a  budget and they have to juggle the costs each month. If they have some costly premieres, then they may have to make it up with more cheaper repeats.

 

Another thing to keep in mind is that parent Time-Warner made major cuts and layoffs to it's television properties this year. I believe TCM escaped the layoffs, but I'll bet their budget got cut. So that means more repeats.

 

Still compared to other movie channels, TCM has far fewer repeats than say the Encore channels where they may run the same film eight or ten times within a month. Then there's Fox Movie channel which only runs commercial free classics about 10-12 hours a day and they just keep repeating the same 75 or 80 movies over and over and over.

Believe it or not, there may be the element that repetition of films makes the channel seem more attractive and accessible, the same way many radio stations have a limited playlist of songs.

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It seems like moving to digital has limited what they can use from the library.

 

 

 

TCM can show digital and non-digital videos. It might have more to do with SD and HD, with TCM trying to move more toward HD videos to promote their HD channel.

 

However, TCM has stopped showing INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS (1956), even though a new copy is now available on blue-ray. Maybe distributors/owners start charging more for their TV rentals whenever they make an old film available for sale on disk, and maybe TCM doesn't want to pay the new cost of renting it. I don't know.

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TCM can show digital and non-digital videos. It might have more to do with SD and HD, with TCM trying to move more toward HD videos to promote their HD channel.

 

However, TCM has stopped showing INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS (1956), even though a new copy is now available on blue-ray. Maybe distributors/owners start charging more for their TV rentals whenever they make an old film available for sale on disk, and maybe TCM doesn't want to pay the new cost of renting it. I don't know.

how do films like Hot Spell (1958) once in the tcm catalog get to somehow be outta the tcm catalog? :huh:

favoritism? :D

the film stars Anthony Quinn, Shirley Booth, Shirley MacLaine, Earl Holliman, Eileen Heckart and Warren Stevens but tcm won't show it.

Why???

Too much trouble to procure?

MOVIES! shows commercials and edits out profanities but at least they're not slackers when it comes to procurement. :)

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TCM has stopped showing INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS (1956), even though a new copy is now available on blue-ray. Maybe distributors/owners start charging more for their TV rentals whenever they make an old film available for sale on disk, and maybe TCM doesn't want to pay the new cost of renting it. I don't know.

Hi Fred-- I created a thread about the original BODY SNATCHERS in the Science Fictions sub-forum. It is going to be airing on the Encore Suspense Channel.

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Hi Fred-- I created a thread about the original BODY SNATCHERS in the Science Fictions sub-forum. It is going to be airing on the Encore Suspense Channel.

 

Dang!

 

I guess Encore out-bid TCM.

 

Encore has a lot of movies but most of them aren't very good. I got the service free for three months, and I wasn't very impressed with their movies.

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how do films like Hot Spell (1958) once in the tcm catalog get to somehow be outta the tcm catalog? :huh:

favoritism? :D

the film stars Anthony Quinn, Shirley Booth, Shirley MacLaine, Earl Holliman, Eileen Heckart and Warren Stevens but tcm won't show it.

Why???

Too much trouble to procure?

MOVIES! shows commercials and edits out profanities but at least they're not slackers when it comes to procurement. :)

 

MOVIES is just as much a so called 'slackers' when it comes to procurement of movies as TCM.   e.g. how many Warner, MGM or RKO movies does MOVIES show?    Very few.   MOVIES is a Fox related company which is why they show mostly Fox films.     TCM is a Time-Warner company.   This is why they show mostly Warner, MGM and RKO movies.

 

Why I wish TCM would spend more to get Fox, Columbia and Paramount films MOVIES clearly has LESS variety of films then TCM.  

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First of all, let me just wish everyone out there today a wonderful and merry Christmas!!!

 

Not every film that is in a studio’s or distributer’s vaults are available to be leased or rented. There are literally thousands of films still sitting in their film canisters collecting dust that have not been opened in years. And there is simply not enough money being spent to make new digital masters of these older films and part of that is the economy and another part is that many of those in charge see no economic benefit to creating new digital masters.

 

The simple fact of the matter is that while many here bemoan the idea that there are so many films available to be shown on TCM, why isn't TCM doing more about showing all of these wonderful older films?

 

The reasons are complicated but they are also based in the economic reality we all live in today. Is there a market for these films and will people purchase these films if we (the studios and or distributors) can make a profit?

 

Since switching over to digital a few years back digital masters are needed to show the films that are shown on TCM now.

 

Back in early 2010, TCM online reported that of the 162,984 films listed in its database (based on the authoritative AFI Catalog), only 5,980 (3.67 percent) are available on home video. So what does this figure tell you?

 

According to other folks like the late Kyle in Hollywood and lzcutter here at the message boards:

 

Rey,

 

What you failed to explain is

 

1.) If there is no longer a Turner library of classic films that is readily available to TCM why does Robert Osborne and Ben M. continue to refer to some vast film library that is readily available to TCM?

 

2.) You continue to quote that old canard about the lack of digital film masters, yet we see commercials on TCM every day for the latest DVDs and Blue Rays from the Warner Archive collection made from the latest digital video masters. There are some new digital masters of films that have been available on the home video market for years. Why can't we at least see those films on TCM?   

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Besides North By Northwest which I think the TCM programmer has the hots for, there are not many repeats to bother me. And with a gazillion cable channels now and growing, it's not like we are forced to watch this station and suffer a repeat, lol. I am actually seeing some nice ones coming up I have been wanting to see so will concentrate on those.

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Rey,

 

What you failed to explain is

 

1.) If there is no longer a Turner library of classic films that is readily available to TCM why does Robert Osborne and Ben M. continue to refer to some vast film library that is readily available to TCM?

I agree with the above statement. I have heard both Bob and Ben mention the Turner Library in the past year during wraparounds on TCM. So the company library is still very much intact and it does drive programming and serving as the basis for the business model.

 

The programmers do what I call 'peppering,' where they season a monthly schedule with maybe two or three Paramount or Universal titles (not much) and maybe five or six titles from Fox, to make it seem like all the Hollywood studios are recognized and represented on TCM-- but the truth is that only films from MGM, WB, RKO, Monogram and UA are in their library. By the way, some of the outside titles are public domain, so even if we see a Paramount logo on a scratchy print of THE LIVES OF THE BENGAL LANCER, it does not mean they worked with Universal to acquire it and spend money on it.

 

I have no problem with TCM using what it has at its disposal. But one on-going issue is that it makes it seem that stars only had a few major hits if the same Turner Library titles keep getting repeated. Also, when someone famous dies who worked primarily at an outside studio (like Deanna Durbin at Universal) we do not get whole-day memorial tributes for them. We are lucky to see one special title at the end of the year for an In Memoriam segment. So programming does betray the TCM business model sometimes, we have to be honest about that. They know it, and we know it.

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