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Luise Rainer Dead at 104?


drednm
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On wiki, the cause of death is listed as pneumonia. 

 

TCM has a morning birthday tribute already planned for her on January 12th.

 

I belonged to a Facebook group dedicated to her for the last five years. In the summer, someone posted a great picture of her sipping a cappuccino at an outdoor coffee shop. 

 

She lived a long and active life. God bless her always!

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Sadly, we lost Joan Fontaine a little more than a year ago at the age of 96. And now Rainer. This makes Olivia de Havilland -- at age 98 -- the oldest living major Academy Award winner. Sidney Poitier, who will be 88 in February, is the oldest living male Oscar winner.

 

Rainer has become the Academy Award winner who lived the longest. What a wonderful life!

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Who's Willard Scott? ;)

 

Wrote "Ivanhoe", didn't he?! ;)

 

(...sorry...again, folks...yeah, I know we should hold some reverence for AND relevance to the recently departed Miss Rainer here...please excuse my/our frivolity...just think of this as maybe an updated version of that classic MTM episode "Chuckles Bites the Dust" if that helps at all...and so, now back to Miss Rainer, may she rest in peace)

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Here's TCM's article on Luise Rainer:

 

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/movie-news.html?id=1055386&name=TCM-Remembers-Luise-Rainer-1910-2014-

 

Sounds like some programming changes will be forthcoming.

 

For her 105th birthday on January 12th, they had already scheduled seven of Rainer's movies as well as a repeat of Robert Osborne's 2011 interview with her at the TCM Classic Film Festival. They don't really need to do anything else, unless it is decided to move the tribute from daytime to prime time.

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For her 105th birthday on January 12th, they had already scheduled seven of Rainer's movies as well as a repeat of Robert Osborne's 2011 interview with her at the TCM Classic Film Festival. They don't really need to do anything else, unless it is decided to move the tribute from daytime to prime time.

My guess is that the times will be adjusted, because they will probably have Robert film special wraparounds, and I wouldn't be surprised if they do move it to primetime.

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Is she going to be in TCM Remembers 2014 or is it too late to add her in?

 

They always have shots that can easily be removed and replaced with an actor should someone pass between the time the piece is first released and the end of the year.  I don't know if they'll re-edit this year's to include her, but I hope they do. 

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And just as I thought that we would make it without any end-of-the-year surprises.... I've said it before, but it bears repeating that it's been a very tough year in the entertainment world.

Well, the first thing I want to say is...wow. She was 104. A century with some years to spare; that's a feat in itself. And she kept making appearances at classic film events and documentaries up until the very end. I think that Luise Rainer was a prime example of how success and its downsides can go hand in hand. She definitely had talent, and a gentle, light, earthy quality that still resonates today. It was a shame the way that her career didn't take off the way that it should, and that she wasn't given a chance to showcase the rest of her talents throughout the years. And her name often doesn't come up in the annals of talented actresses from the time period. They done her wrong, I say! But that's what we are here for. It's wonderful that there is a community of classic film lovers who haven't forgotten her, and who will keep her films alive. It was a life well-lived, and she always seemed to be smiling.

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You know what's crazy? I was reading an article today about her daughter and apparently her daughter recently came out with a book that had a lot of negative things about her mother. She claimed things like her mother was controlling, nothing was ever good enough for her, she had emotional issues, etc etc the same thing other "mother dearest" books state. 

 

I had no idea Luise Rainer also had a daughter did "mommy dearest" on her as well. Well one thing is for sure, if she was truly crazy and and the big B, she might be the longest living craziest B that has lived. Of course I'm kidding and really am shocked that her daughter would automatically start promoting her book shortly after her mother's death. 

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And just as I thought that we would make it without any end-of-the-year surprises.... I've said it before, but it bears repeating that it's been a very tough year in the entertainment world.

Well, the first thing I want to say is...wow. She was 104. A century with some years to spare; that's a feat in itself. And she kept making appearances at classic film events and documentaries up until the very end. I think that Luise Rainer was a prime example of how success and its downsides can go hand in hand. She definitely had talent, and a gentle, light, earthy quality that still resonates today. It was a shame the way that her career didn't take off the way that it should, and that she wasn't given a chance to showcase the rest of her talents throughout the years. And her name often doesn't come up in the annals of talented actresses from the time period. They done her wrong, I say! But that's what we are here for. It's wonderful that there is a community of classic film lovers who haven't forgotten her, and who will keep her films alive. It was a life well-lived, and she always seemed to be smiling.

 

I love the uniqueness of Rainer but I don't know if one can blame the suits for the fact her unique gifts were not showcased.   Instead I see a chicken \ egg type deal where one can either fault the star or the suits or both to some degree.   But at the end of the day it really was the public that didn't accept her since the public tends to like cookie cutter entertainers.    

 

Rainer was the actress that pushed me into another type of film a few decades ago.   I loved 30s - 50s noir, crime, gangster and Bogie \ Cagney pictures but not much else.    Since I knew William Powell from the Thin Man series I decided to watch The Great Ziegfeld.

 

Rainer really blew me away from the start of that first scene with Powell in her dressing room.  

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I love the uniqueness of Rainer but I don't know if one can blame the suits for the fact her unique gifts were not showcased.   Instead I see a chicken \ egg type deal where one can either fault the star or the suits or both to some degree.   But at the end of the day it really was the public that didn't accept her since the public tends to like cookie cutter entertainers.    

 

 

VERY true about the public's expectations; she herself even commented on that as a reason why her career didn't go the way that she wanted it to. People claim to want variety and then balk when they get it. Then again, she also was disillusioned with Hollywood and what she saw as its superficiality and disingenuousness. Mayer did have it out for her, though.

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