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Life Itself is chicken feed


NipkowDisc
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if you're gonna pay homage to roger ebert then doan putz around I say.

 

how about a tcm-financed broadway musical based on roger ebert's greatest creative triumph...

 

 

Beyond the Valley of the Dolls: The Musical :)

 

Rather have Chicken Little the Musical

 

golden+girls+henny+penny+2.jpg

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if you're gonna pay homage to roger ebert then doan putz around I say.

 

how about a tcm-financed broadway musical based on roger ebert's greatest creative triumph...

 

 

Beyond the Valley of the Dolls: The Musical :)

 

Ebert was proud of the 1970 film, which was directed by his friend Russ Meyer. It has since become a cult film.

 

Here's what we wrote about it:

 

"And the movie as a whole? I think of it as an essay on our generic expectations. It's an anthology of stock situations, characters, dialogue, cliches and stereotypes, set to music and manipulated to work as exposition and satire at the same time; it's cause and effect, a wind-up machine to generate emotions, pure movie without message. The strange thing about the movie is that it continues to play successfully to completely different audiences for different reasons. When Meyer and I were hired a few years later to work on an ill-fated Sex Pistols movie called 'Who Killed Bambi?' we were both a little nonplussed, I think, to hear Johnny Rotten explain that he liked 'Beyond the Valley of the Dolls' because it was so true to life."

 

By the way, "Life Itself" isn't just about Ebert's career. It's also about how he coped with certain death after serious cancer surgery that disfigured his face and left him unable to talk or eat normally.

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Ebert was proud of the 1970 film, which was directed by his friend Russ Meyer. It has since become a cult film.

 

Here's what we wrote about it:

 

"And the movie as a whole? I think of it as an essay on our generic expectations. It's an anthology of stock situations, characters, dialogue, cliches and stereotypes, set to music and manipulated to work as exposition and satire at the same time; it's cause and effect, a wind-up machine to generate emotions, pure movie without message. The strange thing about the movie is that it continues to play successfully to completely different audiences for different reasons. When Meyer and I were hired a few years later to work on an ill-fated Sex Pistols movie called 'Who Killed Bambi?' we were both a little nonplussed, I think, to hear Johnny Rotten explain that he liked 'Beyond the Valley of the Dolls' because it was so true to life."

 

By the way, "Life Itself" isn't just about Ebert's career. It's also about how he coped with certain death after serious cancer surgery that disfigured his face and left him unable to talk or eat normally.

No thanks.

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I'm being facetious and am merely trying to illustrate just how silly it is for cnn to glorify ebert. :)

Oh, I know, I got that. I was trying to be parsimonious (where'd that come from? :D ) and, for a change, kind with my wording, but I completely, positively, absolutely agree with you.

 

Very silly.

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I disagree that it is inappropriate to pay tribute to Roger Ebert. He was a wordsmith extraordinaire. He was more than just a movie reviewer. Leonard Maltin is just a movie reviewer. It was a pleasure to hear Roger speak as well as read what he had to say, because he spoke with such passion. I do think that the way that he died, horribly disfigured from cancer treatment, and the courage with which he faced it is part of the reason he is remembered. Perhaps if he had died at age 90  in his sleep from a heart attack he would be less remembered. But Ebert's passing is just part of and symbolic of the death of journalism, for me, at age 57 (come Wednesday). For example,  I read the Washington Post today and the writing is just so vapid, and shallow compared to that same publication 23 years ago when I started working in that town.

 

Just a little aside. I had a huge crush on Roger Ebert in the early 80's. From the moment I heard him say in response to a film clip "Wow, something boring has happened!" he had my heart. Just my two cents.

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I think it funny as to how Nip has fallen into that category of people who think that anytime some small amount of attention, bland or not, that's given to a topic, person or item that THEY don't really care for, then they call it "glorifying".

 

Like him or not( I simply just didn't mind him all that much), Roger Ebert was well respected by both his peers and contemporaries.  Simply doing a sort of biographical profile of him isn't neccesarily "glorifying" him.

 

UNLESS they showed footage of an old photograph of him while Mozart's "REQUIEM" played in the background!

 

 

Sepiatone

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I think it funny as to how Nip has fallen into that category of people who think that anytime some small amount of attention, bland or not, that's given to a topic, person or item that THEY don't really care for, then they call it "glorifying".

 

Like him or not( I simply just didn't mind him all that much), Roger Ebert was well respected by both his peers and contemporaries.  Simply doing a sort of biographical profile of him isn't neccesarily "glorifying" him.

 

UNLESS they showed footage of an old photograph of him while Mozart's "REQUIEM" played in the background!

 

 

Sepiatone

Yes, but is he getting all this attention because he was great at his job, with which I don't agree, or because he had a disfiguring disease, which sooooooooooooo many other people have as well, or because his wife has figured out how to hog the spotlight?

 

So let's see, that leaves HOW many who are good or great at their jobs and have a disfiguring disease left to get specials on CNN?

 

CNN had better get cracking.

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Yes, but is he getting all this attention because he was great at his job, with which I don't agree, or because he had a disfiguring disease, which sooooooooooooo many other people have as well, or because his wife has figured out how to hog the spotlight?

 

So let's see, that leaves HOW many who are good or great at their jobs and have a disfiguring disease left to get specials on CNN?

 

CNN had better get cracking.

Siskel & Ebert seriously trashed two comedies I thought were very funny. Mel Brooks' History of the World PT. 1 and Nat'l Lampoon's European Vacation.

I well remember them critiquing The Brooks film. They both said they abhorred Brooks' use of "bathroom humor".

is that stupid or what? :)

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Siskel & Ebert seriously trashed two comedies I thought were very funny. Mel Brooks' History of the World PT. 1 and Nat'l Lampoon's European Vacation.

I well remember them critiquing The Brooks film. They both said they abhorred Brooks' use of "bathroom humor".

is that stupid or what? :)

 

No, well, I don't anyway, ND.

 

(...and btw, I also thought Mel's HOTWP1 wasn't that funny, 'cause very few of his jokes in it were "new" or "fresh" and like his earlier triumphs, "Young Frankenstein" and "Blazing Saddles'...I mean by that I saw almost EVERY one of 'em "coming down Main Street" before he got to the punchline, "bathroom humor" or NOT...and perhaps with one of the FEW funny bits in it being, "I have 15...oops...TEN Commandments here!")

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...

 

Just a little aside. I had a huge crush on Roger Ebert in the early 80's. From the moment I heard him say in response to a film clip "Wow, something boring has happened!" he had my heart. ...

 

I can't say that I've ever paid too much attention to any film critic or reviewer, but I've always appreciated a snappy retort, especially when it employs absurdity and sardonicism, or, when the moment is just right, sarcasm. Ebert's line above is great! I don't think he would have delivered it to my taste, but full credit must always go to the writer!

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No, well, I don't anyway, ND.

 

(...and btw, I also thought Mel's HOTWP1 wasn't that funny, 'cause very few of his jokes in it were "new" or "fresh" and like his earlier triumphs, "Young Frankenstein" and "Blazing Saddles'...I mean by that I saw almost EVERY one of 'em "coming down Main Street" before he got to the punchline, "bathroom humor" or NOT...and perhaps with one of the FEW funny bits in it being, "I have 15...oops...TEN Commandments here!")

you mean you doan think Madeline Kahn getting of whiff of Dom DeLuise's boomper is funny? :lol:

 

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