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DID JERRY LEWIS PAY OFF FRENCH FILM CRITICS TO LIKE HIS DUMB FILMS?


TomJH
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testing, testing . . .

 

Just a theory that a dumb thread title might produce more views because of its controversial nature. And, if it does, so what? Doesn't take a lot of brains (which I just proved) to do so.

 

No intelligent discourse on film is expected to occur here.

 

Please feel free to move on to a thread more worthy of your consideration. (Unless someone else wants to add their idea of a dumb thread title).

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testing, testing . . .

 

Just a theory that a dumb thread title might produce more views because of its controversial nature. And, if it does, so what? Doesn't take a lot of brains (which I just proved) to do so.

 

No intelligent discourse on film is expected to occur here.

 

Please feel free to move on to a thread more worthy of your consideration. (Unless someone else wants to add their idea of a dumb thread title).

 

http://www.vanityfair.com/online/daily/2013/07/french-love-jerry-lewis-paris

 

It's interesting to note that in this country, his style of humor wore thin as demonstrated in his last movie "Hardly Working" (1980)

 

One of the worst films ever to acheive commercial release in the country......Roger Ebert (who gave it zero stars)

 

hardly_working_poster.jpg

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Well, seein' as how "no INTELLIGENT discourse is expected to occur here", then THIS baby sounds like it'll be right up MY alley here, ol' buddy!!! LOL

;)

 

And so....I just wanna say here that every time this topic of Jerry and his "French connection" rears its head, it always reminds me of a line that comedian Dennis Miller once said back when he was SLN's "Weekend Update" anchor.

 

Miller was in the midst of "reporting" french actor Gerald Depardieu's latest run-ins with the french police while a picture of the actor was being projected on the wall behind him. After Miller was finished he turned around to look at that picture and said...

 

gerard-depardieu.jpg

 

"Hmmmm...so THAT'S 'France's biggest male sex symbol' here, huh?! Well, NOW I'm starting to understand why Jerry Lewis is considered such a 'comedy genius' in that country!"  

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Well, seein' as how "no INTELLIGENT discourse is expected to occur here", then THIS baby sounds like it'll be right up MY alley here, ol' buddy!!! LOL

;)

 

And so....I just wanna say here that every time this topic of Jerry and his "French connection" rears its head, it always reminds me of a line that comedian Dennis Miller once said back when he was SLN's "Weekend Update" anchor.

 

Miller was in the midst of "reporting" french actor Gerald Depardieu's latest run-ins with the french police while a picture of the actor was being projected on the wall behind him. After Miller was finished he turned around to look at that picture and said...

 

gerard-depardieu.jpg

 

"Hmmmm...so THAT'S 'France's biggest male sex symbol' here, huh?! Well, NOW I'm starting to understand why Jerry Lewis is considered such a 'comedy genius' in that country!"  

Not a lot of respect for French taste, eh?

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The obvious reason some French people love some Jerry Lewis films is because they remind them of the style of some Jacques Tati films.

I hope that's not true, Fred.

 

I'm no Lewis expert (only able to get through a couple of his films) but I've yet to see him do anything with the subtlety of Mr Hulot's Holiday.

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http://www.vanityfair.com/online/daily/2013/07/french-love-jerry-lewis-paris

 

It's interesting to note that in this country, his style of humor wore thin as demonstrated in his last movie "Hardly Working" (1980)

 

One of the worst films ever to acheive commercial release in the country......Roger Ebert (who gave it zero stars)

 

hardly_working_poster.jpg

Interesting article, ham. I noticed as to their question "why is he so popular" that it doesn't advocate my "Lewis pay off" theory, though.

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I hope that's not true, Fred.

 

I'm no Lewis expert (only able to get through a couple of his films) but I've yet to see him do anything with the subtlety of Mr Hulot's Holiday.

 

For me "Who's Minding The Store (1963) is one of his best.  When I first saw it as a teenager, the mounted lion aftermath scene left me in hysterics.  :lol:

 

 

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I like Jerry Lewis films. I admit it. In my early film going experiences in small town Tennessee, his movies were the ones I went to see. They may not hold up as well as some other comedies, but they entertained my grade school age self.

 

Well I'm a fan of Jerry Lewis movies also,  especially his early solo work.    Yea, watching them today I can see how silly they are but he still makes me laugh.      I posted this so you wouldn't be so alone!   :D

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I like Jerry Lewis films. I admit it. In my early film going experiences in small town Tennessee, his movies were the ones I went to see. They may not hold up as well as some other comedies, but they entertained my grade school age self.

Well, humour is such a subjective thing, Helen.

 

I love so many comedians of the golden era - starting off with the sophistication of Moe, Larry and Curly, but there's also Jack Benny, Bob Hope, Stan and Ollie, the Marx Brothers, W. C. Fields, Abbott and Costello (moreso when i was a kid though they can still make me chuckle today), Lucy when she was I Love Lucy, Keaton, Chaplin, the underrated Charley Chase, even Red Skelton and Jackie Gleason  when the mood strikes me. More recently, there was Bill Cosby (yeh, yeh, I know, but he was good), the divinely crazy Mel Brooks, Woody Allen before he got serious, the Second City gang. Lewis just wasn't one of them, so his popularity was always a bit of a mystery to me. The French films critics being paid off theory still appeals to me.

 

You're not French, by any chance, are you, Helen? (NOT THAT THERE'S ANYTHING WRONG WITH THAT, Jerry and George might chime in now).

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DID JERRY LEWIS PAY OFF FRENCH FILM CRITICS TO LIKE HIS DUMB FILMS?

Don't get me wrong:  I love Truffaut, Rohmer, Gabin, Arletty, Moreau, Bardot, Caron, Fernandel, and countless other celluloid Froggies, even Jean-Pierre Leaud when he was in his tadpole stage.  And my wife is a gamine supreme who was raised in great part in Paris.

 

So although I've never acquired a taste for snails or frogs legs or french fries with mayonnaise, it's not as if I'm instinctively hostile to Left Bank (or Right Bank) opinion.

 

But as to the question about Jerry Lewis, I've got but one answer:

 

THERE IS NO OTHER POSSIBLE LOGICAL EXPLANATION, SINCE  JERRY LEWIS MAKES KENNY BANYA SEEM HILARIOUS BY COMPARISON.

 

WHEN THEY SAY IT'S NOT ABOUT THE MONEY, IT'S ABOUT THE MONEY.

 

 

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Waiting for a really funny moment or two in most Jerry Lewis movies can be excruciating. An example of this is 'The Disorderly Orderly' - there is one hilarious sight gag involving him trying to roll spaghetti on his fork. It's the only laugh out loud moment in the entire movie.

 

This is common to his films and makes watching them a tedious endeavour. I've found only three exceptions to this generality:

 

'The Delicate Delinquent' (1957) has some funny silliness going for it early on.

 

'The Nutty Professor' (1963) has some early moments that are quite humorous - that all ends of course the moment the nerdy professor turns into an obnoxious puke.

 

The other is the only Lewis vehicle that I ever found to be truly funny as a movie - almost the whole movie is hilarious. That would be 'The Patsy' (1964). Easily the greatest film of his solo career  - and with the batch of Hollywood legends that appear in it, it's a wonder TCM has never run it.

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Well, humour is such a subjective thing, Helen.

 

I love so many comedians of the golden era - starting off with the sophistication of Moe, Larry and Curly, but there's also Jack Benny, Bob Hope, Stan and Ollie, the Marx Brothers, W. C. Fields, Abbott and Costello (moreso when i was a kid though they can still make me chuckle today), Lucy when she was I Love Lucy, Keaton, Chaplin, the underrated Charley Chase, even Red Skelton and Jackie Gleason  when the mood strikes me. More recently, there was Bill Cosby (yeh, yeh, I know, but he was good), the divinely crazy Mel Brooks, Woody Allen before he got serious, the Second City gang. Lewis just wasn't one of them, so his popularity was always a bit of a mystery to me. The French films critics being paid off theory still appeals to me.

 

You're not French, by any chance, are you, Helen? (NOT THAT THERE'S ANYTHING WRONG WITH THAT, Jerry and George might chime in now).

Nah, I'm a hodgepodge of many Western European ancestry but France is not one of the countries, at least I don't think so. Mainly Irish, English with a dash of German and there are rumors of Native American. However, I have been to France a few times and I love it!

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I once sat on an airplane beside a really amusing, charming young lady whose father owned a bakery in Las Vegas. She told me that the store's baker was a highly volatile individual who HATED Jerry Lewis.

 

One day Lewis came into the store and when the baker found out he was there, ran out from the kitchen and threw a cake into the comedian's face. Unfortunately, she had heard this story second hand and it ended rather abruptly there. She didn't know what happened to either Lewis or the baker afterward.

 

I would like to think that the baker was either inspired to make his own tribute to silent slapstick comedy at that moment or he was speaking on behalf of all those who found the journey through a Jerry Lewis comedy to be an excruciatingly long one.

 

8d04318b-a2c1-43fc-ba66-8fd4e68e9fbf_zps

 

Even in this photo: NOT funny, Jerry! But I sure would have liked to have been in that bakery to see that pastry all over your pan. 

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I once sat on an airplane beside a really amusing, charming young lady whose father owned a bakery in Las Vegas. She told me that the store's baker was a highly volatile individual who HATED Jerry Lewis.

 

One day Lewis came into the store and when the baker found out he was there, ran out from the kitchen and threw a cake into the comedian's face. Unfortunately, she had heard this story second hand and it ended rather abruptly there. She didn't know what happened to either Lewis or the baker afterward.

 

I would like to think that the baker was either inspired to make his own tribute to silent slapstick comedy at that moment or he was speaking on behalf of all those who found the journey through a Jerry Lewis comedy to be an excruciatingly long one.

 

8d04318b-a2c1-43fc-ba66-8fd4e68e9fbf_zps

No matter what his motive, I'll bet Lewis liked it, and may have thrown some of the cake at other customers.

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No matter what his motive, I'll bet Lewis liked it, and may have thrown some of the cake at other customers.

 

He most definitely would NOT have liked it.

 

Lewis is not known for his sense of humour. He's inordinately proud and always took himself and his position way serious.

 

The Bobby Bittman character that Eugene Levy created so brilliantly for SCTV was very much based on Lewis' humorless and self-important real-life persona.

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This thread's existence is a perfect example of Tom's insensitivity to other posters. If he really wanted to talk about Jerry Lewis, did he have to reference the Lew Ayres thread I created in such a derogatory way...? The language in his OP is anything but tolerant, severely lacking empathy and goes a long way toward promoting board disharmony. 

 

http://forums.tcm.com/index.php?/topic/51704-lew-ayres-on-tcm-today/

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I mentioned Jacques Tati because Jerry Lewis' THE BELLBOY reminds me a lot of Tati's style, since both Tati and Jerry do a lot of mime and silent sequences containing only sight-gags. It's as if they are making old-fashioned silent films. I saw THE BELLBOY in the theater years ago and when I saw my first Tati film on TCM a few years ago, I immediately recognized the similarity in styles.

 

I don't like any of Jerry's films in which he is a loud-mouth goofball. Any fool can do that kind of stuff.

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Really? I get the impression that off screen Jerry is a bit pompous and takes himself quite seriously.

I'm going by what Bogdanovich says in his book. Everything he says is very pro-Lewis, including that on the set, he was constantly engaged in hijinks with the crew, and they all loved it.

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I'm going by what Bogdanovich says in his book. Everything he says is very pro-Lewis, including that on the set, he was constantly engaged in hijinks with the crew, and they all loved it.

 

Of course none of us have big egos and none of us ever engage in highjinks. :)

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This thread's existence is a perfect example of Tom's insensitivity to other posters. If he really wanted to talk about Jerry Lewis, did he have to reference the Lew Ayres thread I created in such a derogatory way...? The language in his OP is anything but tolerant, severely lacking empathy and goes a long way toward promoting board disharmony. 

 

http://forums.tcm.com/index.php?/topic/51704-does-showing-films-with-anti-war-lew-ayres-in-them-make-you-anti-tcm/

Keep it up,TB. You're adding to my thread views!

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