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Lights Of New York tomorrow early morning


midnight08
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"Lights Of New York" , the first all talking motion picture is airing early in the morning tomorrow

January 7. If I'm correct it's been over ten years since it was last shown on TCM.

I've seen it before. It's less than an hour long and although it's not a great movie it's historical

being the first all talking film. Personally I find it a lot better than "The Jazz Singer" which was a hokey

story even back in 1927. I'm glad it's still in existence as most of the talkies and part talkies from 1928

are "lost".

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"Lights Of New York" , the first all talking motion picture is airing early in the morning tomorrow

January 7. If I'm correct it's been over ten years since it was last shown on TCM.

I've seen it before. It's less than an hour long and although it's not a great movie it's historical

being the first all talking film. Personally I find it a lot better than "The Jazz Singer" which was a hokey

story even back in 1927. I'm glad it's still in existence as most of the talkies and part talkies from 1928

are "lost".

Wow, thanks for the head up midnight. Shouldn't this have been an ESSENTIAL, RO and DB? Essential to all those here, especially?  

 

As Maltin said about it, the:

 

Story may be routine, production crude, and acting laughable, but all that is overshadowed by the fact that this fascinating artifact was the first "100% All-Talking Picture'' 

 

It's no wonder many of the leads never went on to talking picture notoriety, with the exception of the less rotund Pallette. I guess their forte were the silent pictures. And was the writer Hugh Herbert the same as the mediocre actor? At any rate, it was indeed a fascinating artifact and as you said, midnight, we're lucky to still have it around.

 

Oh, and that country town 45 minutes from Broadway? Wasn't that Eddie Foy's town (and mine), New Rochelle?

 

Thanks, TCM, but in future, have your two bobble-heads promote it at night.

 

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Aside from being the first all talkie, Lights of New York, its story involving gangsters, will also be remembered as being the first to have an actor utter that now hoary old line:

 

"TAKE HIM FOR A RIDE."

Tom, The Hawk actually enunciated it thusly:

 

Take.........him.........for....................a................ride.

 

:D 

 

Fun hour.

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looked like tcm cropped the left side.  the  l  was missing from lights.

TCM didn't make the print.  When movies show edges cropped like that, it's an indication it's been copied two or more times for different venues.  The aspect ratios for theatrical performances and television are slightly different.  So when a movie is copied back and forth, parts of the image are lost, as it's enlarged to fill the screen.  You'll notice in some of the medium and close-up shots that the tops of people's hats and heads are chopped off.  

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its hardly likely they would crop the title.  more likely they wanted to give you a movie that was imperfect.  but I have a vhs of it I'll check & see.  :)

 

Yes, it is likely the title would get cropped.  With multiple enlargements, and careless registering.  Enlarging would not automatically happen from the center out equally to both sides.  When this and other films like this were first converted for TV in the 50s and 60s, it wasn't done with the kind of care and attention to detail that even low-budget efforts today would have.  In fact, on a number of early sound films you see on TCM, you will notice the title sequence a little bit smaller than the full screen, in effect picture-framed.  I expect this is done to avoid what you noticed on this film.  Once the credits are done, it goes to full screen, where small cropping of the image is viewed as unimportant--though not to me.

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Yes, it is likely the title would get cropped.  With multiple enlargements, and careless registering.  Enlarging would not automatically happen from the center out equally to both sides.  When this and other films like this were first converted for TV in the 50s and 60s, it wasn't done with the kind of care and attention to detail that even low-budget efforts today would have.  In fact, on a number of early sound films you see on TCM, you will notice the title sequence a little bit smaller than the full screen, in effect picture-framed.  I expect this is done to avoid what you noticed on this film.  Once the credits are done, it goes to full screen, where small cropping of the image is viewed as unimportant--though not to me.

Ah. Yes, I have noticed that, and wondered why. Thank you for that.

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looked like tcm cropped the left side.  the  l  was missing from lights.

 

I think that the reason one side is cropped is because the soundtrack was inserted there. Originally, Lights of New York was a Vitaphone film, which had the sound on a disc. This system could not hold a candle to sound on film, which is what Fox Films used in its early sound films. When nobody used the old sound on disc systems anymore, a small piece of one side of the film was sacrificed so the soundtrack could be added, otherwise the film could not be exhibited. You'll also see this "cropping" on the Green Goddess and other very early Warner Brothers talkies when they air on TCM.

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I think that the reason one side is cropped is because the soundtrack was inserted there. Originally, Lights of New York was a Vitaphone film, which had the sound on a disc. This system could not hold a candle to sound on film, which is what Fox Films used in its early sound films. When nobody used the old sound on disc systems anymore, a small piece of one side of the film was sacrificed so the soundtrack could be added, otherwise the film could not be exhibited. You'll also see this "cropping" on the Green Goddess and other very early Warner Brothers talkies when they air on TCM.

 

So, I guess what you and slaytonf are saying is that what ever was used to make the digital video master was already cropped. Does anyone know if an uncropped version of this film still exists somewhere, Library of Congress for example, complete with the sound on a disc?

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So, I guess what you and slaytonf are saying is that what ever was used to make the digital video master was already cropped. Does anyone know if an uncropped version of this film still exists somewhere, Library of Congress for example, complete with the sound on a disc?

 

I would recommend getting in touch with the Library.

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