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Films That Make You Blubber


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There's many movies that make me cry....like IMITATION OF LIFE's ending and when Helen Keller says "water". I'm a real softie, emotional type when I get sucked into a movie.

 

But nothing, nothing made me cry like a baby as much as Barry Fitzgerald's mother's entrance at the end of GOING MY WAY. I get tears just writing about it. We all know how we "put things off" in life and love is really the only important thing.

 

As for DUMBO or BAMBI, it may have traumatized you as a kid, but I'm sure any of you could handle it as an adult. Yes, the enchained mother scene in Dumbo is heart wrenching and surprisingly touching for a cartoon, but compared to the live action films discussed here, rather tolerable.

 

I draw the line at live action animal stories, though. No way would I ever see MARLEY or YELLER. 

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There's many movies that make me cry....like IMITATION OF LIFE's ending and when Helen Keller says "water". I'm a real softie, emotional type when I get sucked into a movie.

 

But nothing, nothing made me cry like a baby as much as Barry Fitzgerald's mother's entrance at the end of GOING MY WAY. I get tears just writing about it. We all know how we "put things off" in life and love is really the only important thing.

 

As for DUMBO or BAMBI, it may have traumatized you as a kid, but I'm sure any of you could handle it as an adult. Yes, the enchained mother scene in Dumbo is heart wrenching and surprisingly touching for a cartoon, but compared to the live action films discussed here, rather tolerable.

 

I draw the line at live action animal stories, though. No way would I ever see MARLEY or YELLER. 

but I'm sure any of you could handle it as an adult. 

 

You might think so, but you'd be wrong.

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For me it was the scene in The Battle of Algiers where the French have just tortured an old man with a blowtorch in an attempt to make him inform on the FLN.  He finally gives in under the pain and talks, but when the French soldier then hands him a cup of coffee, his whole body begins to shake at the realization of his betrayal, and he emits a loud scream of what can only be described as agonized despair.  I can't imagine the death of an animated deer causing an emotional reaction on this scale.

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I remember going to the show with a young lady in 1990 to see AWAKENINGS.

 

Robert de Niro plays a man who suffers from a "sleeping" sickness who, when taking certain medications, suffers from major physical side effects, unable to control most of his body including arching his neck, and suffering terrible tremours.

 

But for a while his terrible symptoms subside and he meets a young woman, who thinks that he's a "normal" person, and they like each other.

 

The scene that really got to me in the theater was the one in which the girl meets De Niro again, only by now his horrible physical symptoms have returned. The girl is sensitive and sympathetic but doesn't know what to say at his obvious physical and mental distress.

 

But it was De Niro, trying his best to retain his dignity, while his body was betraying him with his tremours, that really got to me.

 

But I'm watching this film on the big screen, with this beautiful girl beside me, and I feel a sniffle coming on. I'm biting into my tongue until it starts to bleed, but no sobs came out of me. I successfully retained my masculinity that evening. Of course, later in the same film she's crying but that's okay. Somehow I didn't feel that it would serve me well with her if I had struggled with her for her hanky. In fact, if I had suddenly burst out with the biggest sobs in the theatre, and started blowing my nose into a hanky sounding exactly like a Canada goose, that just wouldn't look good at all!

 

Damn but that de Niro was good! He really put me on that spot that night.

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For me, it's the scene in THE BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES when Homer finally puts his arms around Wilma, and the LOOK on her face when he does! 

 

I'm getting dewy-eyed just TYPING about it!

 

 

Sepiatone

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Oooh, just thought o' one I know you'll appreciate as a "tearjerker", O' Originator of Thread...and I'll bet our gal Speedy will too...

 

The scene near the end of "Adventures of Don Juan" where Errol and Viveca Lindfors must part company due to their different stations in life.

 

(...not bad, eh?!...oh, and of course, the similar ending in "The Prisoner of Zenda" will always bring a tear to me little eye too)

THE PARENT TRAP, MAKE WAY FOR TOMORROW, IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE

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I draw the line at live action animal stories, though. No way would I ever see MARLEY or YELLER. 

 

Animal movies are the ones most likely to bring on the waterworks for me.

 

I cried like a baby when I saw A KID FOR TWO FARTHINGS for the first time on TCM's Essentuals Jr this past summer.

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Yep - The aforementioned "Imitation of Life" "Dumbo" "Marley and Me"

 

The ending of "My Dog Skip" kills me, and jeez, the dog even lived his full natural life.

 

The ending of "An Affair to Remember"

 

I find several moments in "As Good as It Gets" very emotional. The point when Kinnear's character gets his artistic mojo back, the change of heart of Nicholson's character re: Greg Kinnear's at the end when he offers Kinnear his spare room, and the ending when Nicholson gives Hunt a "great compliment" and she gets it. I loved all the characters and the satisfying journey they take makes the ending emotional and so satisfying, the tears can flow. Part of this may be Hans Zimmer's beautiful score which also hits all the right chords for me.

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You watched Marley & Me? Gack!

 

Yes, I lost my mind one night and watched it when it was on television, after having avoided the book and the film for years.  And then spent the rest of the night hugging my cats and blubbering, "Why did I do that to myself?"

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Yes, I lost my mind one night and watched it when it was on television, after having avoided the book and the film for years.  And then spent the rest of the night hugging my cats and blubbering, "Why did I do that to myself?"

:) I totally understand. As George Carlin said, when you get a pet, you're purchasing a small tragedy.

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The scene on the train in Stella Dallas where Stella overhears her daughter's friends mocking her, and then her daughter climbs into the bunk with her.

 

The scene in Remember the Night when Barbara Stanwyck's mother rejects her.  Stanwyck's emotions are so raw that they always bring me to tears. 

 

The scene in A Tree Grows in Brooklyn in which the mother, who is in labor, says how much she misses the father.  Also, the graduation scene when Joan Blondell presents the flowers from the father to Peggy Ann Garner.

 

The farewell scene in They Died with Their Boots On, as well as several points in The Best Years of Our Lives always move me.

 

I always cry when Ronald Colman leaves Shangri-La in Lost Horizon.

 

I wept copiously throughout Philomena.  I also cried shamelessly during Les Miserables, especially during Ann Hathaway's solo, Eddie Redmayne's "Empty Chairs and Empty Tables" (that boy is destined for greatness), and during Jean Valjean's death scene, partly because Hugh Jackman's face reminded me of my father's at his time of death.

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A couple of years ago I caught the restored How Green Was My Valley at our Cinematheque.  I was impressed by the numbers of young viewers who were blubbering in the seats.

Timeless work indeed.

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I always cry when Ronald Colman leaves Shangri-La in Lost Horizon.

 

 

I find that the departure scene from Shangri-La is my favourite moment in the film. I think it's a combination of Tiomkin's soaring musical score, combined with that look of "am-I-doing-the-right-thing" doubt on Ronald Colman's face. He's being called to leave by his brother, to whom he is loyal, yet the look in Colman's eyes speak volumes. You can see that he's torn about leaving and want to call out to him, "Don't do it!"

 

Yeah, I get a bit choked up, too, because you sense that Colman will later regret his decision. Those tears in his eyes really sell the scene.

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There is a melancholy in Colman's eyes and voice that I find very compelling.  There are points during Random Harvest that I find especially moving, especially the early part when he is the confused and shell-shocked vet, even though I know the movie is pure schmaltz.  

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Ronald Colman is the source of so many blubber-worthy scenes for me. Certainly the scenes mentioned (and others) in Random Harvest and Lost Horizon; and many scenes in The Light that Failed, one of my favorite Colman films. Oh -- and of course the scene where he comforts Isabel Jewell in A Tale of Two Cities.

 

Btw, I don't consider Random Harvest to be schmaltz!

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Ronald Colman is the source of so many blubber-worthy scenes for me. Certainly the scenes mentioned (and others) in Random Harvest and Lost Horizon; and many scenes in The Light that Failed, one of my favorite Colman films. Oh -- and of course the scene where he comforts Isabel Jewell in A Tale of Two Cities.

 

Btw, I don't consider Random Harvest to be schmaltz!

I don't know that it's a blubber worthy scene. However Colman does have a very strong scene in The Light That Failed, that moment as he lies in bed when he suddenly realizes that he is blind. Colman does not play the scene for false stoic heroics; he is like a scared lost child whose vulnerability is palpable.

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Sad?? Have they ever heard of adoption?21-mini.gif

Cry for the unwanted, unloved!

 

Yes ham, I agree. In fact, I was adopted as an infant, myself.

 

However, while that short vignette of Carl and Ellie's life does include that scene where it's shown they're told they can't have any children, I think the sadder part about it was probably Carl's loss of his beloved wife.

 

(...and btw, I also always cry for all the children in the world who are raised by their natural parents, but who seem ill-prepared to raise them as well as the little ones deserve to be...and there's a lot of those out there too, ya know) ;)

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The Day of the Dolphin, Harry and Tonto, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, The Pumpkin Eater, Summer and Smoke, and so many more I can't think of now.

 

Just remembered HAL singing "Daisy, Daisy," as he's "dying," in 2001.  That gets me every time.

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