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Colorado_Kid

Books on celebrities that made you change your mind about them

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Can anyone offer comments by Shelley  on her working with director Charles Laughton on NIGHT OF THE HUNTER?  I have the new dvd of the film that has the bonus dvd feature of Laughton's doing  many multiple takes with her; Laughton seemed to be very pleasant and patient but also  very persistent in getting Shelley to give him  just what he wanted in a scene.  Did she comment on how " hauntingly beautiful"  she looked in her scene sitting in the car at the bottom of the river?   That has to be one of the most memorable  moments in any film  ever.

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Can anyone offer comments by Shelley  on her working with director Charles Laughton on NIGHT OF THE HUNTER?  I have the new dvd of the film that has the bonus dvd feature of Laughton's doing  many multiple takes with her; Laughton seemed to be very pleasant and patient but also  very persistent in getting Shelley to give him  just what he wanted in a scene.  Did she comment on how " hauntingly beautiful"  she looked in her scene sitting in the car at the bottom of the river?   That has to be one of the most memorable  moments in any film  ever.

 

 

Maybe someone else can say. It's been many years since I've read her books, so I cant remember.......

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Yes, that RED dress! I dont find the lyrics stupid. It fits the show/story/character. I WAS surprised that the song developed a life of its own and became a standard of sorts as the lyrics werent really run of the mill modern........

I love theater and musical theater, but oddly, I'm not mad about Sondheim.  I loved the first show I ever saw (in its waning days) -- A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum. I even lamented that the movie cut a lot of the great songs. I love Sweeney Todd, which I've seen many times -- the original still the best. But, although I have enjoyed many of the other shows -- Company, Pacific Overtures, A Little Night Music, I just don't love them. I saw Night Music in a London revival with Judi Dench; and Follies with Diana Rigg and Dolores Gray, but for the most part I find the works overrated. I did enjoy a London production in a small theater of Road Show, which was a big flop in NY, but theatrically it worked in the small house in London (but the music/lyrics were fairly boring).  Sondheim has criticized the lyrics of others; but I find his don't always work for me. And of course the operative words are "for me." I know his work is much beloved.

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Can anyone offer comments by Shelley  on her working with director Charles Laughton on NIGHT OF THE HUNTER?  I have the new dvd of the film that has the bonus dvd feature of Laughton's doing  many multiple takes with her; Laughton seemed to be very pleasant and patient but also  very persistent in getting Shelley to give him  just what he wanted in a scene.  Did she comment on how " hauntingly beautiful"  she looked in her scene sitting in the car at the bottom of the river?   That has to be one of the most memorable  moments in any film  ever.

 

How was that death scene shot done?   e.g.  was she actually underwater?   If so,  in a pool in the studio (where the backdrop was added later)?

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I love theater and musical theater, but oddly, I'm not mad about Sondheim.  I loved the first show I ever saw (in its waning days) -- A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum. I even lamented that the movie cut a lot of the great songs. I love Sweeney Todd, which I've seen many times -- the original still the best. But, although I have enjoyed many of the other shows -- Company, Pacific Overtures, A Little Night Music, I just don't love them. I saw Night Music in a London revival with Judi Dench; and Follies with Diana Rigg and Dolores Gray, but for the most part I find the works overrated. I did enjoy a London production in a small theater of Road Show, which was a big flop in NY, but theatrically it worked in the small house in London (but the music/lyrics were fairly boring).  Sondheim has criticized the lyrics of others; but I find his don't always work for me. And of course the operative words are "for me." I know his work is much beloved.

 

 

I can only go by the recordings of his shows as I've never seen a production "live" I wish I could have seen the original Follies. I knew some people that did. :(

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I can only go by the recordings of his shows as I've never seen a production "live" I wish I could have seen the original Follies. I knew some people that did. :(

You might enjoy this, if you haven't seen it. In 2010, the BBC Proms celebrated Sondheim's 80th birthday with a program at the Royal Albert Hall. This is amazing. Sondheim was in the audience.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kMQLCQ8kYTs

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You might enjoy this, if you haven't seen it. In 2010, the BBC Proms celebrated Sondheim's 80th birthday with a program at the Royal Albert Hall. This is amazing. Sondheim was in the audience.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kMQLCQ8kYTs

 

 

Thanks. I forgot I did see a college production of Company (Bad. LOL)

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I've been on a biography kick recently. Read Lee Marvin, George C. Scott, Henry Fonda, Robert Altman, John Huston, James Cagney, Dennis Hopper and currently reading Peter Cushing. Cushing and Cagney escaped unscathed, but all of the others were as bad or much worse than I had imagined. Lee Marvin' s drinking was so bad I'm surprised he functioned at all. And Scott came across as a real monster, and the author seemed to be a fan, so I can't imagine how bad it would have been if they'd had an axe to grind.

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I've been on a biography kick recently. Read Lee Marvin, George C. Scott, Henry Fonda, Robert Altman, John Huston, James Cagney, Dennis Hopper and currently reading Peter Cushing. Cushing and Cagney escaped unscathed, but all of the others were as bad or much worse than I had imagined. Lee Marvin' s drinking was so bad I'm surprised he functioned at all. And Scott came across as a real monster, and the author seemed to be a fan, so I can't imagine how bad it would have been if they'd had an axe to grind.

 

Am curious about Robert Altman?

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Altman's drinking and drugging were both pretty awful, and he had a tendency for unwarranted petty cruelty towards those closest to him. He very matter-of-factly told his children on numerous occasions that his career would always come before them. And his directorial style was very loose to say the least, and it seems a miracle he had as many great films to his name as he did. I've always liked Nashville, McCabe & Mrs Miller, Short Cuts, MASH and Gosford Park, but they seem to have been happy accidents more than carefully planned masterpieces.

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Altman's drinking and drugging were both pretty awful, and he had a tendency for unwarranted petty cruelty towards those closest to him. He very matter-of-factly told his children on numerous occasions that his career would always come before them. And his directorial style was very loose to say the least, and it seems a miracle he had as many great films to his name as he did. I've always liked Nashville, McCabe & Mrs Miller, Short Cuts, MASH and Gosford Park, but they seem to have been happy accidents more than carefully planned masterpieces.

 

 

I see. I've always liked him as a director. I'll have to read up on him........

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How was that death scene shot done?   e.g.  was she actually underwater?   If so,  in a pool in the studio (where the backdrop was added later)?

About the death scene with Shelley sitting in the car at the bottom of the river. First of all I am certain that I read that it was a very realistic  looking "dummy" of her in the car. I recall some actress (No, not Drew) commenting  to RO during an intro about "Shelley holding her breath" , not sure if that remark was as a joke, or if she was serious?  The water was perfectly clear and still so it was definitely done in a studio.  Regardless,  it is a most memorable scene and I am sure Shelley heard a lot of comments about that over the years.

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About the death scene with Shelley sitting in the car at the bottom of the river. First of all I am certain that I read that it was a very realistic  looking "dummy" of her in the car. I recall some actress (No, not Drew) commenting  to RO during an intro about "Shelley holding her breath" , not sure if that remark was as a joke, or if she was serious?  The water was perfectly clear and still so it was definitely done in a studio.  Regardless,  it is a most memorable scene and I am sure Shelley heard a lot of comments about that over the years.

I read it was a dummy.  I thought it was really the most effective thing I'd ever seen along those lines.  Haunting.  I thought she did a miraculous job in that picture.  What a tour de force it was for Laughton, and what a shame he never directed another movie.

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Re Sondheim:  When he was approached by David Kernan to do a show about his music, he said the only thing more boring would be to read aloud the Book of Kells.

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While every actor is obviously not gay it makes me laugh to see those who don't think there's a chance that some of the great stars of the golden era were

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Dothery said: I read it was a dummy.  I thought it was really the most effective thing I'd ever seen along those lines.  Haunting.  I thought she did a miraculous job in that picture. 

 

What? The MANNEQUIN did a miraculous job? Or Shelly?  :rolleyes: 

 

I only discovered when watching the Criterion release that it was a mannequin, and noticed the slit throat for the first time.

 

In the Criterion "outtakes", it seemed like Laughton was really tough on Winters.

 

I especially liked how she conveyed her disappointment when the preacher told her he wouldn't "be pawing her in that disgusting way" on their wedding night!

Amazing acting by Shelly Winters. I swear she employs her HAIR when acting, she's so thorough!

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Dothery said: I read it was a dummy.  I thought it was really the most effective thing I'd ever seen along those lines.  Haunting.  I thought she did a miraculous job in that picture. 

 

What? The MANNEQUIN did a miraculous job? Or Shelly?  :rolleyes:

 

I only discovered when watching the Criterion release that it was a mannequin, and noticed the slit throat for the first time.

 

In the Criterion "outtakes", it seemed like Laughton was really tough on Winters.

 

I especially liked how she conveyed her disappointment when the preacher told her he wouldn't "be pawing her in that disgusting way" on their wedding night!

Amazing acting by Shelly Winters. I swear she employs her HAIR when acting, she's so thorough!

 

Love that comment about the mannequin because I had the same feeling.  After reading that first post about Winters, that scene and Laughton being tough on Winters,  I felt that this was like Hitchcock and Kim Novak in Vertigo;   did the director make the actress get wet over and over by doing retakes?

 

But I see that the being tough on Winters isn't related to that specific scene since Winters isn't actually in it! 

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 A member of the "actor's studio" I see that Shelley had  also studied with Charles Laughton (hard to imagine a better teacher than him) and they must have had a good rapport , that's why he cast her.  She was very good in NIGHT OF THE HUNTER.  She played  it very low key, a very vulnerable woman who needed a man in her life and welcomed the "preacher's"  dominating personality.  In those multiple takes with director Laughton he seemed to have infinite patience with Shelley, but he knew what he wanted from her in the scene and she didn't mind doing it over and over to accomplish that.  Laughton apparently felt uneasy about working with the children (not that he didn't like them maybe just unable to relate to them) so they looked to Mitchum for instruction.  Laughton really was outstanding directing this, both in  working with his actors and giving us the visual picture. 

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Love that comment about the mannequin because I had the same feeling.  After reading that first post about Winters, that scene and Laughton being tough on Winters,  I felt that this was like Hitchcock and Kim Novak in Vertigo;   did the director make the actress get wet over and over by doing retakes?

 

But I see that the being tough on Winters isn't related to that specific scene since Winters isn't actually in it!

 

Or Jean Negulesco,.director.of 1957's BOY ON A DOLPHIN, where he had Sofia Loren do take after.take.coming out of the very cold Aegean Sea in her wet "diving outfit" dress. In this case, I believe the multiple takes were more for the visuals than to get a more nuanced performance from the actress.

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Or Jean Negulesco,.director.of 1957's BOY ON A DOLPHIN, where he had Sofia Loren do take after.take.coming out of the very cold Aegean Sea in her wet "diving outfit" dress. In this case, I believe the multiple takes were more for the visuals than to get a more nuanced performance from the actress.

 

 

LOL. Or his enjoyment.........

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