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Ever notice there is a real dearth of films...


cigarjoe
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... between say 1965 through the decade of the 1970's anywhere on cable? It's almost as if that whole decade and a half is being wiped from the collective memory banks. Even a lot of the edgier stuff from the 60s onward is sort of missing in action. A few may have been on TCM at one time even, but where are they now?  Films like:

 

Peeping Tom (1960, UK)

Mondo Cane (1962, It.)

Rosemary's baby (1968)

The Great Silence (1968)

Age Of Consent (1969)

El Condor (1970)

Soldier Blue (1970)

Walkabout (1971)

The Last Picture Show (1971)

McCabe & Mrs. Miller (1971)

Carnal Knowledge (1971)

A Clockwork Orange (1971, UK)

Straw Dogs (1971, UK)

Shaft (1971)

Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song (1971)

Prime Cut (1972)

Last Tango In Paris (1972, It./Fr.)

Lenny (1974)

Night Moves (1975)

Farewell My Lovely (1975)

Hardcore (1978)

Pretty Baby (1978)

Monty Python's Life of Brian (1979, UK)

 

 

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These films do show up, just not often, on TCM. And the FLIX channel and sometimes RetroPlex and MoviePlex air them. You sort of mentioned the big guns, but there are a lot of studio programmers from 1965 to 1975 that get lost in the shuffle.

 

Recently, TCM played the MGM neo-noir SOL MADRID, a late 60s entry with excellent production values and an engaging story about the heroin trade. It stars David McCallum, Stella Stevens, Telly Savalas, Ricardo Montalban, Rip Torn and Paul Lukas. What a cast, with everyone at the top of their game.

 

I had never heard of it before. These kinds of films from the 60s/70s are often not on home video, and we rely on cable to bring them to us. They are more 'lost' than others and should be broadcast with regularity.

 

Fortunately, SOL MADRID is scheduled to air again in the near future on TCM-- March 31st.

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Joe, most of these have been on somewhere.  Imagine there are some "rights" issues that may be limiting more showings.  However, I think a lot of them just don't get many viewers when they are on.  I really like Farewell My Lovely (1975) with Robert Mitchum and purchased both the video tape and the DVD later.  It's the best version of the book.  But it may not appeal to a lot of people.  Recently purchased Mitchum's The Big Sleep and while entertaining, nowhere near as good as Bogart's.

Also think many of these were maybe shown too many times about 10+ years ago?  They are also caught between movies from 80's-00's that are coming on the market and movies from the early 60's and earlier that are still very popular.

Many on the list and others from the period are also looked upon as cult or niche movies with limited appeal for commercial showing.

I saw most of these in theaters when released and subsequently on TV.

If really interested in finding these, try CCvideo.com, Heartlandvideo.com or Oldies.com.  A lot of these show up there, especially on Oldies.com.

You might also check out the TV movie channels discussed here.  Ex. Moviestvnetwork, gettv, antennatv, etc.

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I think CARNAL KNOWLEDGE was just ON TCM about a month or so ago.

 

But I know what you mean.

 

But, you also, judging by the number of posts, haven't possibly been here long enough to know that there's a LARGE contingent that feel ANY movie made AFTER 1960 should never, ever, be shown by TCM.  So while you might get some support from a number of members here, it won't be unanimous.  I like several of the movies on your list, have several( still, sadly, on VHS, and yet to be replaced or transferred) in my personal library.  And most of THAT library is ensconced down in the very chilly(in the winter) basement,  O ye with the icy air and floor!  So traipsing down there to look through all the boxes( we moved here about four years ago and in a hurry, and lacked adequate shelf space) to try and find them...but, I know they CAN be found if the urge is strong enough! :D

 

Sepiatone

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Unfortunately everyone's definition of classic is different. We stock everything up through 1979, with some select modern documentaries, but even those focus on Classic Hollywood. I'm a little amused when I go to the local library and see their "classics" section with things released as recently as 5 years ago. To each their own I guess.

 

Brenda

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I think CARNAL KNOWLEDGE was just ON TCM about a month or so ago.

 

But I know what you mean.

 

But, you also, judging by the number of posts, haven't possibly been here long enough to know that there's a LARGE contingent that feel ANY movie made AFTER 1960 should never, ever, be shown by TCM.  So while you might get some support from a number of members here, it won't be unanimous.  I like several of the movies on your list, have several( still, sadly, on VHS, and yet to be replaced or transferred) in my personal library.  And most of THAT library is ensconced down in the very chilly(in the winter) basement,  O ye with the icy air and floor!  So traipsing down there to look through all the boxes( we moved here about four years ago and in a hurry, and lacked adequate shelf space) to try and find them...but, I know they CAN be found if the urge is strong enough! :D

 

Sepiatone

I can find them, that's not what I was alluding too, it's like they just seem missing in action, and TCM is sort of like the stamp of legitimacy, Robert Osborn serves like a beacon to shine a light upon them (like it or not), I rather see them (on the list) and others in prime time with interesting intros from Robert, and not swept under the rug of early morning.

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Unfortunately everyone's definition of classic is different. We stock everything up through 1979, with some select modern documentaries, but even those focus on Classic Hollywood. I'm a little amused when I go to the local library and see their "classics" section with things released as recently as 5 years ago. To each their own I guess.

 

Brenda

Well that's a start that I can agree with up to 1979 as a demarcation point for now, in ten more years go 1989, the lens of time sorts the wheat from the chaff  ;)

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I think a lot of it has to do with the fact  that TV stations and networks cater to younger audiences, which attract sponsors, and in general those viewers are not interested in films that old. Some of us don't want to admit it, but films made in the early 1960's are 50 years old and to some 20 year-old they're just "old movies" and no different than those made in the 1930's. Heck, a lot of them won't watch anything older than 2000 because they see them as "old".

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No need to change the guard JOE, just the channel name from TURNER CLASSIC MOVIES to TURNER CRAPPY MOVIES. You can even keep the familiar TCM except in small case letters (tcm). Just like amc no longer stands for AMC, tcm would no longer have anything to do with TCM. 

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No need to change the guard JOE, just the channel name from TURNER CLASSIC MOVIES to TURNER CRAPPY MOVIES. You can even keep the familiar TCM except in small case letters (tcm). Just like amc no longer stands for AMC, tcm would no longer have anything to do with TCM. 

Crappy is in the eye of the beholder, if the tent doesn't get bigger it's going to eventually fold, I'm watching less and less of TCM as it is now, I'm sure the TCM management can see the big picture, as the base age shifts so must they. You have to keep adding new classics to the pantheon or eventually perish. 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HizZbg-VW40

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Crappy is in the eye of the beholder, if the tent doesn't get bigger it's going to eventually fold, I'm watching less and less of TCM as it is now, I'm sure the TCM management can see the big picture, as the base age shifts so must they. You have to keep adding new classics to the pantheon or eventually perish. 

 

 

 

To me it is too simplistic to say 'if the tent doesn't get bigger it's going to eventually fold'.    There are many cases where the tent gets so big that the essence of the brand is loss.  i.e.  the 'tent' tries to please so many different (varying),  POVs that it fails to attract enough members from any specific POV.  

 

In satellite radio we see that the 'tent' is very narrow and specific,   but with many, many different 'tents' available.

 

In politics there are only two tents that while trying to get bigger, instead are leading to more people defining themselves as independents  (and with many people wishing there were multiple 'major' parties).

 

But back to TCM:  I feel they should stay with the current model (mostly studio-era movies),  since the entire cable TV model isn't going to last long anyhow and soon TV viewing will be like what we see now in satellite radio.     (multiple movie stations that are very era \ decade specific,  genre specific,  etc...).

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THAT'LL muddle up things more than they are now.

 

What you allude to does seem like a good idea, except that "era specific" or "Genre Specific"  movie channels won't just pop up in the regular shuffle of cable "package" selections, but probably be available as "premiums" which cable services will offer for a "monthly fee".

(Humorous aside:  My wife griped once that "Those monthly fees are getting to be as much of a nuisance as the "monthly fee" we girls had to pay since puberty!") 

 

That is, unless you are accepting of an AMC type thing where COMMERCIALS are peppered throughout the presentation!

 

 

Sepiatone

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THAT'LL muddle up things more than they are now.

 

What you allude to does seem like a good idea, except that "era specific" or "Genre Specific"  movie channels won't just pop up in the regular shuffle of cable "package" selections, but probably be available as "premiums" which cable services will offer for a "monthly fee".

(Humorous aside:  My wife griped once that "Those monthly fees are getting to be as much of a nuisance as the "monthly fee" we girls had to pay since puberty!") 

 

That is, unless you are accepting of an AMC type thing where COMMERCIALS are peppered throughout the presentation!

 

 

Sepiatone

 

THAT'LL muddle up things more than they are now.

 

What you allude to does seem like a good idea, except that "era specific" or "Genre Specific"  movie channels won't just pop up in the regular shuffle of cable "package" selections, but probably be available as "premiums" which cable services will offer for a "monthly fee".

(Humorous aside:  My wife griped once that "Those monthly fees are getting to be as much of a nuisance as the "monthly fee" we girls had to pay since puberty!") 

 

That is, unless you are accepting of an AMC type thing where COMMERCIALS are peppered throughout the presentation!

 

 

Sepiatone

 

I should have been more clear;  The model I'm talking about will occur when there is NO cable type service.  Instead all content will be available via streaming services.    But either way,  how these services are priced is an open question.

 

Take Sirius;   Does one pay extra for access to specific stations?   (I only had the service for 3 months when I got a new car).

 

Either way,  there are many different options;

 

One pays for all stations but gets to pick with ones they get

There are bundles of station packages

One can get a bundle but add-on additional stations at a per station cost

etc...

 

All I know is that the various options will benefit the content providers more so then us consumers!

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... between say 1965 through the decade of the 1970's anywhere on cable? It's almost as if that whole decade and a half is being wiped from the collective memory banks. Even a lot of the edgier stuff from the 60s onward is sort of missing in action. A few may have been on TCM at one time even, but where are they now?  Films like:

 

Peeping Tom (1960, UK)

Mondo Cane (1962, It.)

Rosemary's baby (1968)

The Great Silence (1968)

Age Of Consent (1969)

El Condor (1970)

Soldier Blue (1970)

Walkabout (1971)

The Last Picture Show (1971)

McCabe & Mrs. Miller (1971)

Carnal Knowledge (1971)

A Clockwork Orange (1971, UK)

Straw Dogs (1971, UK)

Shaft (1971)

Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song (1971)

Prime Cut (1972)

Last Tango In Paris (1972, It./Fr.)

Lenny (1974)

Night Moves (1975)

Farewell My Lovely (1975)

Hardcore (1978)

Pretty Baby (1978)

Monty Python's Life of Brian (1979, UK)

 

 

 

Some of these films do show up on TCM but not too often. I'm one of those that wouldnt mind more late 60s, 70s (or later) films on TCM....The 70s was a big transition period for films and many good films just didnt find an audience. I would love to catch up on the ones I missed. They dont seem to show up on other movie stations either (that concentrate on more recent fare)....

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since the entire cable TV model isn't going to last long anyhow and soon TV viewing will be like what we see now in satellite radio.     

As I understand it, satellite radio is not doing too well.  That's why Sirrius and XM had to merge and still not a lot of subscribers after the "free" new car intro expires.

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As I understand it, satellite radio is not doing too well.  That's why Sirrius and XM had to merge and still not a lot of subscribers after the "free" new car intro expires.

 

Yes,  satellite radio isn't doing well because there are already many other music delivery options available. 

 

But that doesn't mean that streaming services for movies,  that may someday replace the cable system most are currently using, will not do well.  

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Some of these films do show up on TCM but not too often. I'm one of those that wouldnt mind more late 60s, 70s (or later) films on TCM....The 70s was a big transition period for films and many good films just didnt find an audience. I would love to catch up on the ones I missed. They dont seem to show up on other movie stations either (that concentrate on more recent fare)....

This is what I was getting at, where are they? It's not as if they are constantly in rotation on some channel.

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Beats me. I wish someone would show them!

 

Could it be that 70s films fall in a no-mans-land demographic?    e.g. NOT old enough to be a novelty (like studio-era films),  but not recent enough to have been seen by people over 40 or so when they were teens?      

 

Only a wild guess on my part.  

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This is what I was getting at, where are they? It's not as if they are constantly in rotation on some channel.

 

Didn't I make myself clear enough?? Most 1970s films are so bad, nobody wants to see them. NO DEMOGRAPHIC is interested in them.

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I don't buy the reasoning that assumes that people come to TCM to see the films of their youth. The classic films that I love were made long before I was born.

 

But a '70s film that I would like to see on TCM is The Day of the Locust (1975).   It belongs on TCM!

 

 

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