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Ever notice there is a real dearth of films...


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Hardcore was on Moviestv this morning.  Of course, I am sure it was heavily censored-or maybe not.  The moviestvnetwork website has some pictures from it and one has nudity, so maybe they didn't censor it much.

yep it was and censored.

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I really appreciate everyone's list. So many I forgot about and many I have never seen but would like to. I am not sure if anyone mentioned these two movies I came across while reading different reviews.

Come Back to the Five and Dime, Jimmy Dean

When You Coming Back, Red Ryder?

The reviews were mixed and I don't believe they were released onto dvd.

Just curious if anyone has seen them and if they are good?

Come Back To The Five And Dime Jimmy Dean is going to be on Movies! soon, just saw it advertised BTW.  

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That’s just great! :)

 

They must be very popular!

 

Tonight, I think I’ll watch a 1970s film on CBS.

 

No, make that NBC.

 

No, ABC.

 

Nope, HBO.... no, how about Fox?..... or maybe TBS?.... AMC?.... Bravo??.... Encore??....STARZ?.... CINEMAX?.... Well, maybe WE, ME, YOU, US, THIS, or THAT-TV??....

 

Or..... how about YouTube?..... or maybe some big video store will have a copy of one I can rent or buy. :)

Watching Leadbelly  (1976) as I type on Movies!

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They definitely aren't boring and they were made between the end of what was left of the Hayes Code and what for all intends and purposes is the PC "code" that we have in place now. 

 

Yep. I just watched Peckinpah's 'Straw Dogs' from 1971 on DVD. That's one that gets a fair amount of hate from today's PC crowd, I believe.

 

When I watched it at the age of 21, it shook me - but not for any PC reason. It's intense, reaching into one's subconscious fears about one's worth and capability - as a husband, as a man, as a civilized being.

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Yep. I just watched Peckinpah's 'Straw Dogs' from 1971 on DVD. That's one that gets a fair amount of hate from today's PC crowd, I believe.

 

When I watched it at the age of 21, it shook me - but not for any PC reason. It's intense, reaching into one's subconscious fears about one's worth and capability - as a husband, as a man, as a civilized being.

 

Yea Straw Dogs shook me up too when I saw the film at the age of 18 or so.    Very intense.       I assume the PC crowd object to the rape scene (as well as others) but that scene does tell us about the inner workings of the various characters involved and served a purpose related to the storyline.  

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Yea Straw Dogs shook me up too when I saw the film at the age of 18 or so.    Very intense.       I assume the PC crowd object to the rape scene (as well as others) but that scene does tell us about the inner workings of the various characters involved and served a purpose related to the storyline.  

 

Yes - and it also illustrates that sexuality can be complex, with hidden longings and conflictive impulses. There are many who do not want that to be acknowledged  - who do not want it to be so.

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... between say 1965 through the decade of the 1970's anywhere on cable? It's almost as if that whole decade and a half is being wiped from the collective memory banks. Even a lot of the edgier stuff from the 60s onward is sort of missing in action. A few may have been on TCM at one time even, but where are they now?  Films like:

 

Peeping Tom (1960, UK)

Mondo Cane (1962, It.)

Rosemary's baby (1968)

The Great Silence (1968)

Age Of Consent (1969)

El Condor (1970)

Soldier Blue (1970)

Walkabout (1971)

The Last Picture Show (1971)

McCabe & Mrs. Miller (1971)

Carnal Knowledge (1971)

A Clockwork Orange (1971, UK)

Straw Dogs (1971, UK)

Shaft (1971)

Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song (1971)

Prime Cut (1972)

Last Tango In Paris (1972, It./Fr.)

Lenny (1974)

Night Moves (1975)

Farewell My Lovely (1975)

Hardcore (1978)

Pretty Baby (1978)

Monty Python's Life of Brian (1979, UK)

 

 

A Clockwork Orange shows up fairly regularly on Canada's Encore Avenue.  The Last Picture Show also shows up there and on TCM.  In Canada, Bravo used to show art movies and that's where I saw Last Tango in Paris in 2006.  But it's a much more middlebrow station, especially since it was sold in 2011.  Lenny is surprisingly rare on television.

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Went to the TCM database to look up Straw Dogs.  I now remember seeing it years ago on TV, possibly on TCM as it was uncut and uncensored.

Regardless, I was not impressed with it and actually found it boring.

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  • 3 weeks later...
Here is another forgotten 70's film

 

The Nickel Ride (1974) Wow, another great Neo Noir set in LA, this stars Jason Miller as Cooper one time carny now crime fence, who is practically a double for Charles McGraw without the gravelly voice, there are some great believable performances here from Victor French (who you wont recognize), Linda Haynes, John Hillerman, and Bo Hopkins. This film builds slowly in tension much like Night And The City does. Nice on location 70s LA.   

 

New York Times summary review: The events leading up to the death of a small-time Los Angeles hood provides the basis of this gripping crime drama. The doomed gangster is known as the "key man" because he manages several warehouses containing oodles of pilfered loot. They mobsters have stolen so much that they are running out of space and so desperately need more storage units. They send the fellow out to negotiate for more space, but this takes time. His boss gets nervous and believing the big-hearted "key man" to be more of a risk than an asset orders him carefully watched and ultimately destroyed. ~ Sandra Brennan, Rovi

 

and

 

Excellent and underrated 70's crime noir sleeper

 

Author: Woodyanders (Woodyanders@aol.com) from The Last New Jersey Drive-In on the Left

6 January 2012

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

 

Small-time criminal Cooper (a terrifically intense, restrained, and riveting performance by Jason Miller) manages several warehouses in Los Angeles that the mob uses to store their stolen goods. Known as "the key man" for the key chain he always has on him that can unlock all the warehouses, Cooper is assigned by the local syndicate to negotiate a deal for a new warehouse because the mob has run out of storage space. However, Cooper's superior Carl (a splendidly smooth and dapper turn by John Hillerman) gets nervous and decides to have cocky cowboy button man Turner (marvelously played with swaggering bravado and rip-snorting vitality by Bo Hopkins) keep an eye on Cooper. Director Robert Mulligan, working from a vivid and involving script by Eric Roth, astutely nails the nerve-wracking pressure of eking out a living through illegal means, makes fine use of the gritty urban locations, presents a neat array of colorful, interesting, and totally believable characters, effectively creates and sustains a grim tone throughout, and depicts a harsh and realistic criminal underworld in an admirably stark and unsentimental manner. Miller completely pegs the pain and anguish of a weary and aging bottom man on the totem pole who's in over his head and saddled with more responsibility than he can easily handle; he receives bang-up support from Linda Haynes as Cooper's loyal and concerned ex-dancer girlfriend Sarah, Victor French as hearty and gregarious bar owner Paddie, Richard Evans as obnoxious flunky Bobby, Bart Burns as slippery middle man Elias, and Lou Frizzel as amiable lug Paulie. Jordan Cronenworth's crisp and lively widescreen cinematography offers a wealth of stunning visuals and gives the picture an extra kinetic buzz. Dave Grusin's spare moody score likewise does the brooding trick. The downbeat ending packs a devastating punch. A real sleeper.

 


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  • 4 weeks later...

Watched another 70's gem yesterday, had to buy an MGM manufactured disc to do it.  Hickey & Boggs (1972) right from the get go of opening shot of the Santa Fe Superchief pulling into LA's Union Station and the shots of downtown you are in familiar noir territory, just updadted to the 70's. (on a side bar, it's got to be one of the last shots of the most  famous of the  "named" trains the Superchief was discontinued in 1971) The film is not without flaws but worth a screening on TCM if it's never been shown or resurrected if it has.  :)  Or pick up a disc off Amazon

 

Here is a great spot on review from an IMDb regular

 

Culp directs self, Cosby in brutally effective early-70s noir update 80.gif
Author: bmacv from Western New York
20 April 2002

Action and suspense films from the early 1970s have a distinctive period flavor to them. The surprisingly effective Hickey and Boggs – co-star Robert Culp's sole directorial effort – embodies that disillusioned and dissolute era of movie making. The rough and choppy editing, the oddly cropped shots keep the viewer on edge; so do the less than pristine cinematography and the cacophonous sound track, with dialogue overlaid on a constant, dull background roar of ambient noise. Often this proved to be a recipe for pretentious but empty disasters and cynical exploitation films; here, it all works to keep the level of unease – of menace – uncomfortably high.

Bill Cosby and Robert Culp play the title characters, a couple of down-on-their-luck Los Angeles private investigators. (Many moviegoers of the era apparently expected a big-screen reprise of their successful pairing in the television spoof of the 1960s, I Spy; how wrong they were.) They are engaged to find a missing woman by one of those creepily effete characters who, since Peter Lorre's Joel Cairo in The Maltese Falcon, exist only to set up private eyes in the movies. And as they go about their sleuthing, they uncover a trail of brutally murdered corpses, a situation which does not endear them to the police. They come to learn that the woman they're tracking holds the take from a robbery of the Federal Reserve Bank in Pittsburgh some years before; they've been hired as finger men by one of a number of murky but vicious groups seeking to retrieve the cash.

The movie forgoes crisp, clockwork plotting for a generalized miasma of corruption, duplicity and malaise. There are allusions to the turbulent politics of the times in the involvement of black militants and Chicano radicals; there are whiffs, too, of the specter of newly hatched sexualities that threaten the status quo. At the scene of one murder, they find crushed amyl nitrite poppers and gay porn, while the jaded oldster who engages them suns himself on a towel sited suspiciously close to a set of swings where young children are cavorting; for that matter Culp, in his cups and a masochistic, self-pitying mood, watches his ex-wife flaunt herself in a strip club to be ogled by drunken strangers. 

The malaise, of course, becomes murderous in Walter Hill's very violent screenplay, touching Cosby's character (his estranged wife ends up tortured to death). Still, the two dead-end **** soldier on, more though one another's goading than from any code or commitment – they're both on the verge of giving up and sliding down into the vortex of lust, avarice and revenge that has become their world (and by extension, THE world). Describing Hickey and Boggs makes it sound like the ultimate downer; it is, but it's an uncommonly compelling piece of film making, and one that has pretty much fallen through the cracks of movie history.

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Well Night Moves is going to appear on TCM both this April and June.  And I suspect TCM is the only channel that shows Killer of Sheep.

 

Incidentally the last great movie from the seventies that I've seen was Mikey and Nickey.

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Peeping Tom (1960, UK)


Rosemary's baby (1968)


Walkabout (1971)


The Last Picture Show (1971)


Carnal Knowledge (1971)


 


I have seen all those in the past on TCM, Last Picture Show & Walkabout both within the past year.

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Yes - and it also illustrates that sexuality can be complex, with hidden longings and conflictive impulses. There are many who do not want that to be acknowledged  - who do not want it to be so.

I suppose also, for many of the same reasons, we're not treated to occasional showings of THE BOYS IN THE BAND.

 

 

Sepiatone

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I suppose also, for many of the same reasons, we're not treated to occasional showings of THE BOYS IN THE BAND.

 

I don't really get your connection with what James and I were discussing - objections from the "pc crowd"

 

I didn't realize there was any ambiguous sex in 'The Boys in the Band', or that the pc crowd has any problem with that movie.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I watched Far From the Madding Crowd on TCM recently.  Almost from the '70s -- 1967.  Gorgeous film (looked great on TCM HD!) with a lot of great stuff in it and a brilliant Alan Bates. I didn't think Julie Christie and Terence Stamp were that good, though. The film has just been remade with Carey Mulliigan. It opened in London a few weeks ago to very mixed reviews.

 

bathsheba-and-oaks1.jpg

 

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I don't really get your connection with what James and I were discussing - objections from the "pc crowd"

 

I didn't realize there was any ambiguous sex in 'The Boys in the Band', or that the pc crowd has any problem with that movie.

Mostly to do with your comment on "complex sexuality" and conflicting impulses.  Many do think that is what homosexuality is all about.

 

 

Sepiatone

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Mostly to do with your comment on "complex sexuality" and conflicting impulses.  Many do think that is what homosexuality is all about.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

We were discussing the movie Straw Dogs.   I haven't seen the film in a while but is there a conflicted gay character in the film? 

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Mostly to do with your comment on "complex sexuality" and conflicting impulses.  Many do think that is what homosexuality is all about.

 

Not me. Homosexuality is simply about preferring to engage in intimate activity with a member of one's own gender. If that's the way one is, that's the way one is - "politically correct" people don't seem to have an issue with it.

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70's movies!!

 

Yes, yes and yes!

 

I want to see TCM show them all - especially those from 1970-1974. My all-time favorite 5 year movie era. Freaked out the numbs so thoroughly they started forming watchdog groups to picket theaters, boycott industries and petition governments.

 

Artistic freedom was glorious after so many long years of dictatorship, independent film-makers were like long-deprived kids given keys to the candy store. The films made in the first half of the 70's are a fascinating snapshot of a unique time in movie history. I love 'em.

 

I totally agree with you about American movies from the early 1970s---before the blockbuster mentality led to in essence a new kind of code for mainstream movies which led to moviemaking by committee.  

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I totally agree with you about American movies from the early 1970s---before the blockbuster mentality led to in essence a new kind of code for mainstream movies which led to moviemaking by committee.  

Agree. There are quite a few out there, they should be as familiar as North By Northwest and Gigi.  :D

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