Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Atypical Movies


SansFin
 Share

Recommended Posts

I begin this thread by introducing very wonderful little gem which I found mentioned in non-movie forum. 

 

The Mystery of the Leaping Fish (1916). 

 

It is Douglas Fairbanks as detective and Bessie Love as his love interest.

 

I believe this is far cry from gallant swash-buckling role which would become his specialty. I can think of no other Douglas Fairbanks slapstick comedy. 

 

He is here: "Coke Ennyday" who has large container of cocaine on his desk and bandoleer of syringes for quick pick-me-ups. He eats opium by the fingerful in same manner as child eating icing from a bowl.

 


 

I find it quite delightful! :)

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

ZELIG

MEMENTO

MY DINNER WITH ANDRE

 

...might be considered atypical, after a fashion

 

=

 

They are indeed!

 

I might add: What's Up Tiger Lily (1966) as example of other atypical Woody Allen movie.

 

Momento (2000) calls to my mind other movie which I consider atypical: Dreams (1993).

It is Amalia Mordvinova  as respectable young countess living in 1893.

She becomes troubled by dreams in which she is common guttersnipe living in 1993.

The most learned doctor of the era is unsure if she is mentally ill of if her dreams are prophecy.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Znnr111WFME&feature=youtu.be

Link to comment
Share on other sites

'Daughter of Horror' (1955)

 

It was originally called 'Dementia' (1953) but exhibition was disallowed by the New York censor board at that time (who the hell knows why - society was insane about keeping dark art away from our eyes).

 

Wonderful movie. Here's IMDb's page on it:

 

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0047976/reference

 

Wikipedia also has a page - search for 'Dementia (1955 film)' to access it. The Rotten Tomatoes site has a couple of well-written reviews.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

'Daughter of Horror' (1955)

 

 

I thank you very much! I was not aware of the existence of that movie. The description do very much sound as if it is not typical fare.

 

It calls to my mind: Hausu (1977). It is comedy horror fantasy which belies common genre descriptions. Horrors are very visceral as is most Japanese horror but it transcends simple descriptions. 

 

It is available to watch or download at:

http://archive.org/details/Mag104Movie

 

Trailer for it is at:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WQ_Yo06kIIA

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think Mon Oncle might be another ... and other Jacques Tati films. He was so original. Thinking about this blurs the line between "atypical" and "unique."

 

 

EDIT (add on)

 

Dreams has a nice opening anyway, music and pictures. Couldn't get far though, no subtitles

:(

 

There is another Dreams, by Kurosawa. Perhaps atypical in a way, due to its episodic nature.

Edited by laffite
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dreams has a nice opening anyway, music and pictures. Couldn't get far though, no subtitles

:(

 

 

 

I am very, very sorry I did not include information on Closed Captioning which works as subtitles. I once included instructions each time I would post such a movie but I came to think that no one attempted to watch any and so I fell out of habit.

 

You need only to turn on: Closed Captioning and select: English.

 

GRHxIj8.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I thank you very much! I was not aware of the existence of that movie. The description do very much sound as if it is not typical fare.

 

It calls to my mind: Hausu (1977). It is comedy horror fantasy which belies common genre descriptions. Horrors are very visceral as is most Japanese horror but it transcends simple descriptions. 

 

It is available to watch or download at:

http://archive.org/details/Mag104Movie

 

Trailer for it is at:

I have seen that movie--very odd...but very enjoyable! Two things bothered me though--the charaacters were all sort of stereotypes and the timeline of the movie (the flashback) seemed way off. It didn't really detract from the movie, but it bugged me anyway. I haven't watched a lot of Japanese film--do they always have the characters so clearly cast as "types?" ie the Sporty One, the Smart One, the Flirty One, etc?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I haven't watched a lot of Japanese film--do they always have the characters so clearly cast as "types?" ie the Sporty One, the Smart One, the Flirty One, etc?

 

I am very unqualified to analyze movies. I can state only my guesses and feelings.

 

I find that characters in Japanese movies are in common far more complex than characters in Hollywood movies. It seems to me as if Hollywood characters say: "This is who I am" and Japanese characters say: "This is who I must be for my nation and this is who I must be for my ancestors and this is who I must be for my city and this.is who I must be for my parents and this.. etc." 

 

I believe characters in this movie are so simple because it is meant to very much be camp cartoon. It may wish to lull viewers with sense that it is safe and boring teeny-bopper movie which will hold no surprises. It may wish to seem as if it comes from mind of child where people are nice or scary or smelly or have other one identifying characteristic. 

 

I believe that you will find it odd that characters in actual Japanese cartoons are in common more complex than characters in this movie.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've started Dreams, I see what you mean, cool idea. I began to think of Peter Ibbetson (1935) where separated lovers each dream about the other and no matter which one does the dreaming, they both remember! They can carry on their romance that way. And then I thought of a critical remark somewhere made about Memento, that the conceit involved---telling the story backwards---is such that any other movie that dares use this device will be hammered by the critics for being a copycat. I think the same could be said for Ibbetson. Both movies have a sort of unwritten monopoly on their respective conceits. They therefore transcend the merely atypical and make the claim for being truly unique.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And then I thought of a critical remark somewhere made about Memento, that the conceit involved---telling the story backwards---is such that any other movie that dares use this device will be hammered by the critics for being a copycat. 

 

This calls to my mind the movie: Aelita (1924). I will risk spoiler in saying that at the end it is revealed that all events were a dream only. I risk saying that because it is not important to story. They had advantage then that none could call them copycat because they were first! :)

 

I find one aspect of this movie to be very atypical in that wardrobe of Martians has retained its charm and mystique. Most wardrobes from early science fiction movies look now to be grotesque and clunky. I believe that much of the wardrobe in this movie could be worn in Los Angeles and be accepted as within limits of eccentricity. I do not know how well it might be accepted among normal people but I am sure the reaction would be less than for wardrobe from nearly any other early science fiction movie.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gosh, never thought you could do that with youtube ... thanks for instructions and caps ...

 

It is not option for all movies. Many movies posted there by Mosfilm have the option but it is sad to say that many wonderful movies do not have it and that translation is very poor on some others.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A mention of Sir Christopher Lee in different thread reminded me of: The Return of Captain Invincible (1983).

 

It is  Alan Arkin as title superhero who suffered public shaming and hid away in Australia. He is now alcoholic. He is called from his retirement to face new evil.

 

Sir Christopher Lee is that evil as: Mr. Midnight.

 

Mr. Midnight: Same old dreary demands. Self righteous, messianic, moralistic and increasingly tedious. 
Captain Invincible: Fine talk from a sociopath paranoid schizophrenic with delusions of grandeur. 
Mr. Midnight: Thank you.
 
It is sad to say that I can find only clip:
 
I believe that this scene alone qualifies movie as atypical! :)
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Raja Harishchandra (1913) is credited as first feature-length movie made in India. 

 

It is the story of a king who gives his kingdom to a sage.

 

I believe it qualifies as atypical because male actors fill female roles. This was due to belief that it was improper for women to appear in movies. I knew that this was true of actresses on stage in time of Shakespeare but I had not heard of such belief persisting into Twentieth Century nor it being true of movies.

 

There is historical information at beginning of this video. The movie begins at: twelve minute mark. Move slider under image to change to that time.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I found: The Lounge People (1992) to be atypical even for surreal movies.

 

It is: Buck Henry and: Christine Ebersole as idle rich seeking meaning in their life. He decides to stage: Moby Dick to relieve boredom. Roy Dotrice is dutiful butler. Amanda Plummer and BD Wong give wonderful performances. 

 

I am sorry to say that I can find not even trailer for this wonderful little movie.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not sure if this qualifies as surreal, but it was definitely different. I remember seeing this sometime during my freshman year in college:

The Adventures of Buckeroo Bonzai Across the 8th Dimension

"Adventurer/surgeon/rock musician Buckaroo Banzai and his band of men, the Hong Kong Cavaliers, take on evil alien invaders from the 8th dimension."

(I wonder if this is where the latest incarnation of Dr Who took his cue from?)

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A Serious Man directed by the Coens is the story of Job from the Bible, except without the "happy" ending, set in a Midwestern Jewish family in the 1960's. I think it qualifies as "atypical"--a black-hearted film, with no happy ending, just misery piled upon misery for the "hero" Professor Larry Gopnik. It starts off with a Yiddish folktale about a dybbuk, then moves to someplace in the Midwest and the tormenting of Larry. There's a funny subplot involving his pot-smoking teenage son and a humorous cameo from Simon Helberg (of "Big Bang Theory" fame)as a completely useless rabbi-in-training, but the rest of the movie is pretty bleak, yet somehow, watchable, like a trainwreck...

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7iggyFPls4w

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

David Lynch's 'Lost Highway' (1997) is certainly not a typical film. It's a surreal, perplexing movie that just has to be watched again and again - and read about - in a frustrating attempt to figure it out. Just when you think you might have it figured, doubt jumps in and says "wait, but what about....?"

 

Then, of course, there's his ultimate cult item 'Eraserhead' (1977). The demons he was exorcising from his time living in Philadelphia is at the heart of this monstrous yet fascinating film.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not sure if this qualifies as surreal, but it was definitely different. I remember seeing this sometime during my freshman year in college:

The Adventures of Buckeroo Bonzai Across the 8th Dimension

 

 

I am not seeking surreal movies as such. It is only that most surreal movies are in their own way atypical.

 

The Adventures of Buckeroo Bonzai Across the 8th Dimension (1984) certainly qualifies as atypical! :)

 

It is far different from low-budget science fiction movies and it is different also from parodies of such. It is truly very odd.

 

I may be me only but I have sense that there is touch of Bollywood in it. I believe that speaks well to how truly atypical it is for what is classed as science fiction.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A Serious Man directed by the Coens is the story of Job from the Bible, except without the "happy" ending, 

 

I am sorry to say that I have not watched this movie. I did not know of its existence prior to your posting. 

 

Descriptions of it do sound as if it is very atypical of Coen Brothers movies.

 

I will have to look for it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Adventures of Baron Munchausen (1988) might seem nearly typical because it could be seen as remake of 1943 movie of same name. 

 

I feel this is atypical because it has zaniness which can come only from Terry Gilliam as director and writer. I do not have high regard for his movie: Brazil (1985) but this is him in full-romp mode. It is nearly blending of Marx Brothers and Monty Python.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...