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Atypical Movies


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I feel: The Notorious Sophie Lang (1934) is very atypical movie of its time.

 

Sophie Lang is played by wonderful: Gertrude Michael. She is intelligent, urbane and adventurous lady jewel thief. There had been many suave gentlemen jewel thieves since early days of movies but she was first wholly-rounded lady in this profession. 

 

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I am sorry to say that I can not find this movie or even clip on any reliable site.

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I believe that: The Black Cauldron (1985) was very atypical movie. 

 

Disney was known as studio for delightful and innocent children's movies. Violence was comic and never serious. 

 

This movie was great departure from that legacy. Villains were serious and truly frightening. Threats were very real. Even the landscape was taken from nightmare.

 

I feel that this is very under-rated movie also. People remember well: Fantasia (1940), Alice in Wonderland (1951) and: The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad (1949) but few remember this classic movie even in long lists.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z2FMSrKOdKs

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The Black Cauldron ( and the other books in the series) is by Lloyd Alexander and is a series of children's books based (loosely) on stories from the Welsh Mabinogin  which are a collection of Welsh myth.  They are wonderful books--dark and scary in parts, but with plenty of humor. Like the Harry Potter books, they get darker as the main characters age. I loved them and so did my kids. I don't remember ever seeing the movie version. It looks interesting.

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I have read in commentary for the movie that it was based upon those novels. I am sad to say that they are not available locally. 

 

I believe that I am in proper niche for reading them as it has been several years since I have watched the movie and so have only general attachment to it and likely would not notice which scenes are present or missing and which characters are not parallel in personality or actions.

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I don;t know how you feel about Amazon, but you can get the complete boxed set there:

http://www.amazon.com/The-Chronicles-Prydain-Boxed-Set/dp/1250000939/ref=tmm_pap_title_0?ie=UTF8&qid=1425080143&sr=1-1

 

Susan Cooper's Dark is Rising series is another good children's book quintet (I think there are 5). They are based loosely on the Arthurian legends. A terrible movie was made from the second book a few years ago. Terrible.

http://www.amazon.com/The-Dark-Rising-Sequence-Greenwitch/dp/1442489677/ref=pd_sim_b_2?ie=UTF8&refRID=1ZA57QZJE0BP5GM985WD

 

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0484562/

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I don;t know how you feel about Amazon, but you can get the complete boxed set there:

 

I have an aversion to purchasing fiction books which I have not read. This is due to my nature that once a book has a place on my shelf then that is its home for ever. It wrenches me to dispose of books even when I do not care for them.

 

It is for this reason that I prefer greatly to read books first by borrowing from library or friend. It is when I have deep wish to read that book a second time that I consider purchasing.

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I believe that: Les Enfants Terribles (1950) is very atypical movie.

 

I feel it is nearly documentary of whims. It is of confusion and determination. It is of clinging to innocence while relishing depravity. 

 

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I have an aversion to purchasing fiction books which I have not read. This is due to my nature that once a book has a place on my shelf then that is its home for ever. It wrenches me to dispose of books even when I do not care for them.

 

It is for this reason that I prefer greatly to read books first by borrowing from library or friend. It is when I have deep wish to read that book a second time that I consider purchasing.

 

I almost never throw away books either. If I must dispose of them, I take them to the local used bookstore. I figure that even if I don;t like them, somebody else will give them a home. I have a Kindle and I use it to preview books. If I really like a book, I will buy it as a real "flesh and blood" book (if its available). One nice thing about the Kindle--many books are only a couple of dollars and if you don;t like them, it's not as big a loss. 

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I feel: Happy End (1967) is typical of a certain class of Czech movies of its period in that it has no typical nor predictable elements.

 

It is simple story of life of a butcher. It is complex because it is told from end to beginning. 

 

English subtitles are available by using: Settings -> Subtitles/CC -> English:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uXXX2elMq8c

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Just remembered this one - saw it just once (around '75) and found it to be pretty "different".

 

'Rhinoceros' (1974)

 

Starred Gene Wilder and was about people turning into rhinoceroses.

 

I do not know of this movie. I felt assured that it is very atypical when I googled it and the first return showed: "based on the play by Eugène Ionesco." I feel that is guarantee of best level of absurdity.

 

I feel it is shame that it was not received well by audience or critics. It seems to have all elements necessary for wonderful movie. I find it sad when a movie does not equal sum of its parts.

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I feel it is shame that it was not received well by audience or critics. It seems to have all elements necessary for wonderful movie. I find it sad when a movie does not equal sum of its parts.

 

I don't read critics' reviews when a movie is first released. Not anymore.

 

It's interesting to read what Noel Megahey says when reviewing the DVD 30 years later. Here are a couple of excerpts:

 

Eugene Ionesco’s ‘Theatre of the Absurd’ play, translates superbly to the big screen in its American Film Theatre adaptation – an effort to preserve and present important drama to a wider public. It hasn’t given in to the need to be over-literal or more naturalistic for a cinema audience and there are no real rhino’s running through the film. The use of real rhinos was considered, but the eventual use of only shadows and dynamic POV shots are highly effective and appropriately surreal. By today’s standards however, the play is not as absurd as it may once have been considered, it now resembling not so much Kafka as early Woody Allen. Indeed, the film wouldn’t be out of place (except thematically) as one of the skits in Allen’s Everything You Wanted To Know About Sex (But Were Afraid To Ask). This impression is reinforced by Gene Wilder’s typically eccentric performance in what would normally be considered the central role of Béranger, re-named as Stanley for the AFT film. He is however upstaged by Zero Mostel as his neighbour John. Mostel, reprising his Broadway stage role is simply magnificent, relishing every little gesture and intonation. His transformation into a rhinoceros, done without the aid of make-up or special effects, is one of the great moments of the AFT programme of films.

 

Behind the antics and the humour, the play’s meaning is not that absurd either. The theme of the play is about keeping one’s individuality, refusing to conform and, quite literally, join the herd. From the playwright’s point of view it’s about fascism, and collective anti-rationalist hysteria.......

 

Read more: http://film.thedigitalfix.com/content/id/12493/rhinoceros.html#ixzz3TqEGFkG3

 

I remember the night I watched it on the late show - bemusedly shaking my head about it all. A couple nights later I was in a bar and a slightly older guy started talking about how he'd seen it and said that he thought the movie was scary - which made me laugh at the time. But he wasn't wrong - it's just that I attached so much ridiculousness to the movie that "scary" seemed inappropriate somehow.

 

My library actually has this movie! Gonna have to watch it again after all these years, I think.

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There is a 1969 movie called "FUTZ" about a man in love with a pig.  Porcine pathos perhaps? I once had an 1980s-release VHS tape of it on the old 'I.U.D.' video label [independent United Distributors], but I sold it years ago without watching it.  However, I figured it was pretty 'atypical' just from reading about the plot in Leonard Maltin's book and on the video box. 

 

     I think 'FUTZ' was directed by the same guy who directed 'RHINOCEROS'. 

 

   

 

     

 

          

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There is a 1969 movie called "FUTZ" about a man in love with a pig.  Porcine pathos perhaps? I once had an 1980s-release VHS tape of it on the old 'I.U.D.' video label [independent United Distributors], but I sold it years ago without watching it.  However, I figured it was pretty 'atypical' just from reading about the plot in Leonard Maltin's book and on the video box. 

 

     I think 'FUTZ' was directed by the same guy who directed 'RHINOCEROS'. 

 

 

The plot description at: imdb.com does make it sound very atypical! 

 

I have checked and it is by the same director. Perhaps he was working on both movies simultaneously.

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  • 2 weeks later...

David Lynch's 'Lost Highway' (1997) is certainly not a typical film. It's a surreal, perplexing movie that just has to be watched again and again - and read about - in a frustrating attempt to figure it out. Just when you think you might have it figured, doubt jumps in and says "wait, but what about....?"

 

Then, of course, there's his ultimate cult item 'Eraserhead' (1977). The demons he was exorcising from his time living in Philadelphia is at the heart of this monstrous yet fascinating film.

I watched ERASERHEAD yesterday on Amazon for rent TV.  I must say I have never seen a stranger or more meaningless movie.  The message that Lynch is trying to put across is well beyond my feeble clueless mind if indeed he had a goal or message in mind.  Just a jumbled nightmare of a seriously disturbed mind that can't or won't wake up.  I did dig the haircut though.  I want a couple of hours of my life back after what will be my only viewing.  Wow, I can now brag that I have seen the cult movie ERASERHEAD (1977) but I won't be bragging much if any. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

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