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Lizabeth Scott dies at 92


speedracer5
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Sad News... Lizabeth Scott has died. She was 92.

 

http://www.latimes.com/local/obituaries/la-me-lizabeth-scott-20150206-story.html

I couldn't place her so I looked on Google. She was born in Scranton, Pa. I only saw one of her movies- The Strange Love of Martha Ivers. I have The Racket but haven't watched it yet. Thanks for posting this speedracer5.
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The Film Noir Foundation has supposedly recently restored Too Late For Tears, I'll be getting it as soon as it's available.

Can't blame you for wanting to get that restored version. Lizabeth Scott and Dan Duryea were both so good in this film. This is one of the films I've taken out many times over the years from the library to watch and it's a very good noir. Glad that the film is being restored, really good example of film noir.

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Very sad news, as I think we were hoping she could be lured into a TCM interview before it was too late. 

 

Looking at Scott's filmography, I was surprised at the number of her noirs that I can't remember ever showing up on TCM: Desert Fury; Too Late for Tears; Paid in Full; Dark City; Two of a Kind; and The Weapon.  That last one may not really be a noir, but with Lizabeth Scott and Steve Cochran it's not likely to remind us of The Wizard of Oz.

 

The problem is that these films are either from Paramount (most of them), Republic or Columbia, which probably explains their absence.  If only Paramount could have traded her to Warner Brothers for Doris Day, it would have been a win-win for TCM. :(

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Very sad news, as I think we were hoping she could be lured into a TCM interview before it was too late. 

 

Looking at Scott's filmography, I was surprised at the number of her noirs that I can't remember ever showing up on TCM: Desert Fury; Too Late for Tears; Paid in Full; Dark City; Two of a Kind; and The Weapon.  That last one may not really be a noir, but with Lizabeth Scott and Steve Cochran it's not likely to remind us of The Wizard of Oz.

 

The problem is that these films are either from Paramount (most of them), Republic or Columbia, which probably explains their absence.  If only Paramount could have traded her to Warner Brothers for Doris Day, it would have been a win-win for TCM. :(

 

Well Paid in Full is a soap opera drama, with Robert Cummings as the lead so it isn't a noir.

 

But yea,   Desert Fury, with Mary Astor playing Liz's mom,   Burt Lancaster, and Wendell Corey (most of the I Walk Alone cast) is an interesting color noir, Too Late for Tears a classic with our man Dan,   and Dark City with Heston is OK.   

 

The other films I haven't seen.      Liz will live on in our memories since her films will live on. 

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How odd that today I was thinking about "Paid in Full" - I haven't seen it in twenty years, and I don't think it's been on anywhere since AMC changed format. I hadn't thought much about it in years.  Then I come home and find out Lizabeth Scott has just died.

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There's a good obiturary of Scott in today's NY Times:

 

Lizabeth Scott, Film Noir Siren, Dies at 92

 

Ms. Scott was billed as another Lauren Bacall or Veronica Lake, and in many of her 22 films she portrayed a good-bad girl with love in her head and larceny in her heart, or vice versa....

 

Her breakthrough was “Dead Reckoning” (1947), opposite Bogart. In her ensuing mystery-thrillers — “I Walk Alone” and “Pitfall” in 1948, “Too Late for Tears” in 1949, “Paid in Full” in 1950 — she joined the classic pantheon of film noir: beautiful schemers caught in maelstroms of jealousy, greed, betrayal and murder, but irresistible.

 

Bogart, in “Dead Reckoning,” put it this way:

 

“I didn’t want any part of her, but I kept smelling that jasmine in her hair, and I wanted her in my arms. Yeah. I knew I was walking into something.”

 

 

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I couldn't place her so I looked on Google. She was born in Scranton, Pa. I only saw one of her movies- The Strange Love of Martha Ivers. I have The Racket but haven't watched it yet. Thanks for posting this speedracer5.

I'm with you, Mock.  Not too familiar with all of her work, but the name and FACE are familiar, and anyone in "the biz" really couldn't ask for too much more.

 

At 92, she had a good run.  So, I'm NOT going to "farcebook" it up and post crap like, "She'll live on in our memories", or, "She'll be in our PRAYERS".  In fact, until the original post(with a link that didn't work), I had all but FORGOTTEN about her.   As she didn't DO anything for probably the last 40 years or so, I may have assumed she was ALREADY dead!  THAT happens a lot with me......Still, it is sad news for her loved ones and family (one does NOT always include the other) and, as someone else here posted, "the end of an era...." Which proves we should cherish these treasures while they're STILL WITH US, and NOT wait until they DIE to shower them, or the memories of their fame and fortune with all sorts of guilt fueled love and affection.

 

Rest in PEACE, Lizabeth.

 

 

Sepiatone

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There's a good obiturary of Scott in today's NY Times:

 

Lizabeth Scott, Film Noir Siren, Dies at 92

 

Ms. Scott was billed as another Lauren Bacall or Veronica Lake, and in many of her 22 films she portrayed a good-bad girl with love in her head and larceny in her heart, or vice versa....

 

Her breakthrough was “Dead Reckoning” (1947), opposite Bogart. In her ensuing mystery-thrillers — “I Walk Alone” and “Pitfall” in 1948, “Too Late for Tears” in 1949, “Paid in Full” in 1950 — she joined the classic pantheon of film noir: beautiful schemers caught in maelstroms of jealousy, greed, betrayal and murder, but irresistible.

 

Bogart, in “Dead Reckoning,” put it this way:

 

“I didn’t want any part of her, but I kept smelling that jasmine in her hair, and I wanted her in my arms. Yeah. I knew I was walking into something.”

 

For the record I haven't seen Paid in Full so maybe it is a mystery-thriller but the TCM website says it is a soap opera;

 

"Jane Langley has always done all she can for her selfish sibling Nancy. When both sisters fall in love with handsome Bill Prentice, Jane graciously steps aside. Relationships among all three are further complicated when the now-married Bill realizes he's still in love with Jane".

 

It wouldn't be the first time some reporter that doesn't know much about a classic film star writes an obituary.

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The problem is that these films are either from Paramount (most of them), Republic or Columbia, which probably explains their absence.  If only Paramount could have traded her to Warner Brothers for Doris Day, it would have been a win-win for TCM. :(

 

That probably would not have happened, since she was considered a "Lauren Bacall" type, Warners would not have wanted her, having the original. Otoh, studios would sometimes hire performers similar to one of their stars, both to keep other studios from having a reasonable facsimile of said star, and as a tacit threat to the star, should star act up it become difficult. Scott could have been used to replace Bacall in the MANY films she turned down in the late 40s.

 

The problem is a current one, not something back then, since WE get to rarely see her films, due to many not being shown on TCM.

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(damn this infernal quoting system:) SOMEONE SAID "It wouldn't be the first time some reporter that doesn't know much about a classic film star writes an obituary."

 

 

I SAY: Aside from the possible (?) gaffe about Paid in Full, i thought it was a pretty good obituary otherwise.

 

If I would fully eulogize her- I'd toss in that there is a lot of her work I have missed out on- but her performances I have seen (in Martha Ivers. which is in the public domain and worth watching, Desert Fury and Dead Reckoning) are not entirely sucessful overall- but (like Garbo in Grand Hotel for one example) they are compelling and intriguing in spite of their overall shortcomings, which in itself is a pretty rare class to be in.

 

She had presence, Lizabeth did, there is no arguing that.

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(damn this infernal quoting system:) SOMEONE SAID "It wouldn't be the first time some reporter that doesn't know much about a classic film star writes an obituary."

 

 

I SAY: Aside from the possible (?) gaffe about Paid in Full, i thought it was a pretty good obituary otherwise.

 

If I would fully eulogize her- I'd toss in that there is a lot of her work I have missed out on- but her performances I have seen (in Martha Ivers. which is in the public domain and worth watching, Desert Fury and Dead Reckoning are not entirely sucessful- but (like Garbo in Grand Hotel for one example) they are compelling and intriguing nonetheless, which in itself is a pretty rare class to be in.

 

She had presence, there is no arguing that.

 

 

I said that comment,  but I didn't say the obituary wasn't good. i.e. I was making a general point.  Therefore I feel it is good (communicates her contribution to classic movies well) despite that error.   But I still stand by that general point.   

 

Hey for all we know that reporter heard about the film Paid in Full from Robert Osborne.  We all know how many mistakes he makes. :lol:

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I've always like Lizabeth Scott, her talent, and the special quality she had. How many of you BS-worshippers know that BS made a huge fuss because Scott was to get equal billing in The Strange Love of Martha Ivers. The lawyers settled the billing issue.

 

I like this obituary in the Guardian:

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/feb/06/lizabeth-scott

 

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I've always like Lizabeth Scott, her talent, and the special quality she had. How many of you BS-worshippers know that BS made a huge fuss because Scott was to get equal billing in The Strange Love of Martha Ivers. The lawyers settled the billing issue.

 

I like this obituary in the Guardian:

 

I support Stanwyck since Scott was just starting out when Ivers was made and not close to the star BS was (not close being somewhat of a joke since she wasn't even on the radar).  

 

What I don't understand is why the producers of the film or the studio head would even consider giving a new comer like Scott equal billing.   Makes zero sense to me.    The same goes for Douglas.   At that stage of his career he wasn't the equal of Van Heflin in terms of star power.

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