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Tonite on Svengoolie....


NipkowDisc
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aw, it's a good one...

the monolith monsters from 1957.

 

a quiet southwestern town has to deal with physical contact-petrifying water-activated giant meteoric quartz crystals. a mineralogist's dream. :)

 

and you don't have to wash these one's off under the faucet either. :)

 

wish I still had my how and why book of minerals.

 

you can learn a lot of basic science facts from these old universal-international gems.

 

Les Tremayne as the town newspaper editor and a cameo by William Schallert (who be still with us) as a weatherman.

 

I don't suppose tcm would ever ask him on except to gave a weather forecast.

 

 

:lol:

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Very good sci-fi movie.  We have it on DVD and watch it every few months.

I like the use of De Soto cars, which happened often in movies from that time period.

I would never watch anything on Svengoolie.  Tried recording and fast forwarding through commercials and his BS, but totally destroys the flow of the movies.  Not sure how much they have to edit also.

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Half of the show is the actual movie, the other  half is the corny jokes and gags of Svengoolie. They have to fill the 2 hour time slot and some of these flicks only go for about 75 minutes.  If it were AMC we could have 45 minutes of commercials (UGH). To his credit, Svengoolie does offer up a lot of info about the film and the people in it.  The jokes, well, someone must have an old Milton Berle /  Henny  Youngman gag book. Some are so bad they are good.  I look at it this way, if the film is one that is really good (or at least you like) Svengoolie is a pain .  If the movie is so, so , or really bad, he provides the entertainment to keep you tuned in.  (Cid and I look for the  50's period cars. The Hemi powered De Soto was necessary to speed the little girl to the hospital and save her life.) ;)

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Half of the show is the actual movie, the other  half is the corny jokes and gags of Svengoolie. They have to fill the 2 hour time slot and some of these flicks only go for about 75 minutes.  If it were AMC we could have 45 minutes of commercials (UGH). To his credit, Svengoolie does offer up a lot of info about the film and the people in it.  The jokes, well, someone must have an old Milton Berle /  Henny  Youngman gag book. Some are so bad they are good.  I look at it this way, if the film is one that is really good (or at least you like) Svengoolie is a pain .  If the movie is so, so , or really bad, he provides the entertainment to keep you tuned in.  (Cid and I look for the  50's period cars. The Hemi powered De Soto was necessary to speed the little girl to the hospital and save her life.) ;)

you can definitely pick up tidbits of info from svengoolie. like I never knew Les Tremayne was english. hell, I always thought he was american. :)

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Interesting that Lola Albright was Peter Gunn's girlfriend on the TV series.  Monolith Monsters is on The Classic Sci-fi Ultimate Collection, Vol. 1.  Also sells as a set with Vol. 2.  Amusing that Albright drives a De Soto station wagon which would have been very expensive on a teacher's salary in the 1950's.

Monster on the Campus is also on Vol. 1 and Joanna Moore drives a '59 De Soto convertible.  I think there is also a Plymouth or two in it.  (spoiler alert) Troy Donahue was featured in Monster and is almost as lifeless as the thousand year old dead fish.  He is also in an uncredited role in Monolith where he sets off the dynamite to blow the dam.

BTW, this 10 movie set does bring up the question over whether some are horror vs. sci-fi.  Maybe theory is that if the monster is created by radiation from atomic bomb, it's sci-fi?

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You can say this and that in regard to Svengoolie's schmaltz but I enjoy it.

For all you young ones...those of us who grew up watching The Big Movie or something like it in the 50's, Svengoolie brings back memories of flickering black and white television and numerous antenna machinations.

 

Actually as I stated last week in another topic on Svengoolie, I didn't know Milburn Stone was ever in movies and assumed Gunsmoke was his first large public exposure, until identified in a Svengoolie presented Universal horror movie.

 

As far as the Milton Berle/Henny Youngman routines, they were the originators of television schmaltz so a better fit for Rich Koz you couldn't find.

 

I look forward to Svengoolie on Saturday night, after a bewitching hour of Superman (best in black and white), Wonder Woman (the original WWII topics) and the subtle messages of Gene Rodenberry (which in some cases, sadly have come true) and I can cozy up to an evening in the 50's.

 

As for the cars, what a delight...just looking at the clashing of fins in some, the plethora of Nash Ramblers and others brings back memories of Dinah Shore and seeing the USA in my Chevrolet (actually my USA visions were through a series of Fords), but none the less a trip down memory lane for sure.

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You can say this and that in regard to Svengoolie's schmaltz but I enjoy it.

For all you young ones...those of us who grew up watching The Big Movie or something like it in the 50's, Svengoolie brings back memories of flickering black and white television and numerous antenna machinations.

 

Actually as I stated last week in another topic on Svengoolie, I didn't know Milburn Stone was ever in movies and assumed Gunsmoke was his first large public exposure, until identified in a Svengoolie presented Universal horror movie.

 

As far as the Milton Berle/Henny Youngman routines, they were the originators of television schmaltz so a better fit for Rich Koz you couldn't find.

 

I look forward to Svengoolie on Saturday night, after a bewitching hour of Superman (best in black and white), Wonder Woman (the original WWII topics) and the subtle messages of Gene Rodenberry (which in some cases, sadly have come true) and I can cozy up to an evening in the 50's.

 

As for the cars, what a delight...just looking at the clashing of fins in some, the plethora of Nash Ramblers and others brings back memories of Dinah Shore and seeing the USA in my Chevrolet (actually my USA visions were through a series of Fords), but none the less a trip down memory lane for sure.

 

 

I find in most cases Svengoolie's bits helps the film, doesnt hinder it. Most of the films are bad and I wouldnt watch otherwise........Occasionally he'll play something good, but he doesnt really bother me. I'd rather watch him then 5 mins of commercials.

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  • 3 months later...

Dracula's Daughter (1936), the first horror movie I ever saw and the one that turned me on to the genre at the age of about five -- is on Svengoolie tonight (June 20, 2015). It scared the **** out of me when I saw it on the old Shock Theater, and I still find it's mood as creepy as they come.  Also, it's the first vampire film which offers hints of lesbianism, which was to become more of a feature of later movies with lady vampires. And I think it's also the first vampire film in which the vampire goes to a psychiatrist to attempt a cure. (Draw your own conclusions about all of this).

 

A tidbit of trivia: the "good" girl in the movie is played by Marguerite Churchill, who was married to George O'Brien of Sunrise and other films. Their daughter, Orin O'Brien, has been a double bass player with the New York Philharmonic since 1966 -- the first woman to join the orchestra.

 

 

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Dracula's Daughter (1936), the first horror movie I ever saw and the one that turned me on to the genre at the age of about five -- is on Svengoolie tonight (June 20, 2015). It scared the **** out of me when I saw it on the old Shock Theater, and I still find it's mood as creepy as they come.  Also, it's the first vampire film which offers hints of lesbianism, which was to become more of a feature of later movies with lady vampires. And I think it's also the first vampire film in which the vampire goes to a psychiatrist to attempt a cure. (Draw your own conclusions about all of this).

 

A tidbit of trivia: the "good" girl in the movie is played by Marguerite Churchill, who was married to George O'Brien of Sunrise and other films. Their daughter, Orin O'Brien, has been a double bass player with the New York Philharmonic since 1966 -- the first woman to join the orchestra.

DRACULA'S DAUGHTER also has Otto Kruger-- one of my favorite, most underrated character actors.

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DRACULA'S DAUGHTER sure was a snooze fest. I don't mind Svengoolie's patter in between breaks-it entertains kids and that's how I got involved in old movies too-with horror movie hosts.

Well it's not exactly an action horror. It's more a psychological study about a distraught woman who has a problem she desperately wants to fight, and wants help with. Amazing atmosphere as well, I think. I hadn't seen the film in a long time. One thing that jarred a bit was the way they all just got up and went to Transylvania, as if they were going to Brooklyn on the subway. The whole cast just got up and went, and seemed to get there in a very short time, all in one dark evening! And when they got there, Transylvania is initially depicted by the usual dancing peasants, who become terrified in that usual peasant way, so typical in horror films.

 

I don't remember if Zacherley had joined Shock Theater as the host, at the time I first saw the film -- I think maybe he hadn't arrived on the NY scene from Philly, yet, though he became the host of Shock Theater during its run.

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OK, I'll bite--who or what is "Svengoolie"?  Like Vampira was--a campy horror movie host? (I'm not saying all the films shown are campy).

 

TikiSoo--if the version shown of Draculas Daughter (1936) was a snoozer, all the overt stuff (for 1936) must have been cut out.

 

I was spoiled growing up--there was an old movie station that would show complete films--no cutting--the ordeal was to survive the auto commercials--when the commercials Finally quit, the film picked up right where it left off--I saw all the Pre-Code movies they showed.  Between that & The CBS Late Night Movie(s) (anyone remember those?)--they accounted for my horror movie & Hitchcock movie education.  :)

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OK, I'll bite--who or what is "Svengoolie"?  Like Vampira was--a campy horror movie host? (I'm not saying all the films shown are campy).

 

TikiSoo--if the version shown of Draculas Daughter (1936) was a snoozer, all the overt stuff (for 1936) must have been cut out.

 

I was spoiled growing up--there was an old movie station that would show complete films--no cutting--the ordeal was to survive the auto commercials--when the commercials Finally quit, the film picked up right where it left off--I saw all the Pre-Code movies they showed.  Between that & The CBS Late Night Movie(s) (anyone remember those?)--they accounted for my horror movie & Hitchcock movie education.  :)

 

"Svengoolie" IS one of those "campy" late Saturday horror movie hosts.  In the tradition of the Detroit area's "Morgus" back in the mid '60's, or, "The Ghoul" from out of Cleveland( but also seen here in the Detroit metro area)in the early '70's and poked fun of on SCTV with "Count Floyd". 

 

We didn't have anything like "Vampira" out this way, seems to be a California type of thing.  Anyway, these "hosts" were never meant to be taken seriously, and the corny jokes and cheezy sets WERE intended.  It's all part of the fun.  I suppose SOME of the intent was to not make the "scary" movie more THAN just a movie(for the "kiddies"), and that there's not really all that much to be scared of.

 

Also in the '70's in Detroit, we had a Saturday afternoon "horror" movie host called "Sir Graves Ghastly", who donned the usual Dracula type costume, sat up in a coffin at the start of the show, and did a fair impression of Lugosi's Dracula voice(sort of).  Often, it sounded like VINCENT PRICE trying to immitate Lugosi at a party!  But, he had a HUGE following, and even did "ribbon cuttings" around the Detroit area for years!

 

 

Sepiatone

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DRACULA'S DAUGHTER sure was a snooze fest. I don't mind Svengoolie's patter in between breaks-it entertains kids and that's how I got involved in old movies too-with horror movie hosts.

yeah, some follow-up to Todd Browning's Dracula. I think her manservant shoulda had his head examined. he wants a bite from her? :huh:...

 

and just how is it that the uh...countess zeleska was it?...could be dracula's daughter? he was a 500-year old vampire. van helsing said she was beautiful when she died a hundred years ago? it doan figure. :huh:

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just read up on Gloria Holden on IMDb. she was alright. She didn't like being remembered for Dracula's Daughter and she was the mother of TV and film actor Glenn Corbett, star trek's original Zefram Cochrane.

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OK, I'll bite--who or what is "Svengoolie"?  Like Vampira was--a campy horror movie host? (I'm not saying all the films shown are campy).

 

TikiSoo--if the version shown of Draculas Daughter (1936) was a snoozer, all the overt stuff (for 1936) must have been cut out.

 

I was spoiled growing up--there was an old movie station that would show complete films--no cutting--the ordeal was to survive the auto commercials--when the commercials Finally quit, the film picked up right where it left off--I saw all the Pre-Code movies they showed.  Between that & The CBS Late Night Movie(s) (anyone remember those?)--they accounted for my horror movie & Hitchcock movie education.  :)

 

Svengoolie.jpg

 

he's on MeTV

see: http://svengoolie.com/

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OK, I'll bite--who or what is "Svengoolie"?  Like Vampira was--a campy horror movie host? (I'm not saying all the films shown are campy).

 

TikiSoo--if the version shown of Draculas Daughter (1936) was a snoozer, all the overt stuff (for 1936) must have been cut out.

 

I was spoiled growing up--there was an old movie station that would show complete films--no cutting--the ordeal was to survive the auto commercials--when the commercials Finally quit, the film picked up right where it left off--I saw all the Pre-Code movies they showed.  Between that & The CBS Late Night Movie(s) (anyone remember those?)--they accounted for my horror movie & Hitchcock movie education.  :)

It is a terrible way to watch movies.  Long, long commercials mixed with a "host" doing "humorous" commentary and periodic showing of a horror or scifi movie.

I used to try and record and fast forward through commentary and commercials, but totally not worth watching.

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It is a terrible way to watch movies.  Long, long commercials mixed with a "host" doing "humorous" commentary and periodic showing of a horror or scifi movie.

I used to try and record and fast forward through commentary and commercials, but totally not worth watching.

I first watched Svengoolie after reading about him here -- because I love horror films. I found Svengoolie unbearable, but I actually warmed up to him a little, at least on the occasions that the movies he's showing are really trashy.  But Dracula's Daughter is not such a movie -- it deserves respect. It should be on TCM.

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It is a terrible way to watch movies.  Long, long commercials mixed with a "host" doing "humorous" commentary and periodic showing of a horror or scifi movie.

I used to try and record and fast forward through commentary and commercials, but totally not worth watching.

 

 

Well, since many of the movies are short, they have to fill out the time with something. I was ticked my local station cut the song parody for Dracula's Daughter. They were starting to do one and they cut to a commercial. Did anyone see it? :( I usually enjoy those......

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Svengoolie promoted the fact that a number of actors in this film (several  are in small uncredited parts) would later become well known performers in television or movies . I saw Edward Platt ( of Get Smart, and NORTH BY NORTHWEST) in one of the preview scenes. Svengoolie is good at pointing out these little bits of trivia.

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