Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

I Must Have Been A Hairdresser In A Previous Life ...


Palmerin
 Share

Recommended Posts

... because I keep detecting anachronistic female hairdos in such movies as THE BLUE MAX and THE YOUNG LIONS. For example, in FROM HERE TO ETERNITY Deborah Kerr wears a hairdo that is totally out of place in 1941.

Why do movie makers keep repeating a mistake that is easily avoidable, and certainly very hard to miss? I would bet that, if FROM HERE TO ETERNITY were remade today, all the hairdos would be from 2015! (SNICKER)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

... because I keep detecting anachronistic female hairdos in such movies as THE BLUE MAX and THE YOUNG LIONS. For example, in FROM HERE TO ETERNITY Deborah Kerr wears a hairdo that is totally out of place in 1941.

Why do movie makers keep repeating a mistake that is easily avoidable, and certainly very hard to miss? I would bet that, if FROM HERE TO ETERNITY were remade today, all the hairdos would be from 2015! (SNICKER)

 

This was explained before;   women want to see the latest hairdos more so than they wish to see historical accuracy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The most recent episode of Downton Abbey showed a new footman with hair very full on top and shaved on the sides, not a very credible haircut for the 1920s. Usually that show has a good sense of period, with wonderful costumes, although the writers sometimes use words from outside the period.

 

I agree with Palmerin that an out-of-period hairstyle can really break the illusion and knock you out of a film.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

kingrat said: The most recent episode of Downton Abbey showed a new footman with hair very full on top and shaved on the sides, not a very credible haircut for the 1920s.

 

I was very surprised to see Frank Morgan sporting this 'do in SHOP AROUND THE CORNER. I too thought it was contemporary.

 

Usually that show has a good sense of period, with wonderful costumes, although the writers sometimes use words from outside the period.

 

I always notice language goofs. It certainly was not common for the average person to use vulgarities unless they were a very low class, or sailor or gangster.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This dame longs for historical accuracy!

 

Sorry to generalize but it was a theory that was passed around before when the topic of period clothing (really lack of in a period film), was discussed.   

 

But to me it makes sense.    I have to assume the people in charge of wardrobe and hairstyles know what  the correct period look is (or can do the research),  otherwise they aren't qualified for their jobs.    Therefore the odds are that these are not just sloppy goofs by incompetents but deliberate attempts to showoff more modern looks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

... because I keep detecting anachronistic female hairdos in such movies as THE BLUE MAX and THE YOUNG LIONS. For example, in FROM HERE TO ETERNITY Deborah Kerr wears a hairdo that is totally out of place in 1941.

Why do movie makers keep repeating a mistake that is easily avoidable, and certainly very hard to miss? I would bet that, if FROM HERE TO ETERNITY were remade today, all the hairdos would be from 2015! (SNICKER)

I assume many people in 1953 knew the difference between 1953 and 1941 hairdos. I'll bet that few, except you, in 2015, know the difference between 1953 and 1941 hairdos.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I assume many people in 1953 knew the difference between 1953 and 1941 hairdos. I'll bet that few, except you, in 2015, know the difference between 1953 and 1941 hairdos.

I went to my barber yesterday; he keeps a TV set on his shop, tuned to TCM. I asked him about Kerr's hairdo in FHTE, and he confirmed that I was right regarding the hairdos in that movie. His father served in the USN during WWII, and was a barber in civilian life, so his son would know.

Incidentally, one of the movies broadcast yesterday was the KISMET of 1944. I noticed that the hairdo of Marlene Dietrich, with its ringlets over her forehead, was clearly inspired by the fashions of the 1940s.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I went to my barber yesterday; he keeps a TV set on his shop, tuned to TCM. I asked him about Kerr's hairdo in FHTE, and he confirmed that I was right regarding the hairdos in that movie. His father served in the USN during WWII, and was a barber in civilian life, so his son would know.

Incidentally, one of the movies broadcast yesterday was the KISMET of 1944. I noticed that the hairdo of Marlene Dietrich, with its ringlets over her forehead, was clearly inspired by the fashions of the 1940s.

although not as absurd as this Arabian princess....?

 

tumblr_mldw75JOjY1r7ws74o1_500.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry to generalize but it was a theory that was passed around before when the topic of period clothing (really lack of in a period film), was discussed.   

 

But to me it makes sense.    I have to assume the people in charge of wardrobe and hairstyles know what  the correct period look is (or can do the research),  otherwise they aren't qualified for their jobs.    Therefore the odds are that these are not just sloppy goofs by incompetents but deliberate attempts to showoff more modern looks.

Odd, isn't it?  I suppose it must be deliberate, as researching hair styles, as least the more current ones, shouldn't take much doing. It's always jarring to see such things in movies, or especially hearing modern lingo in a period film.  This drives me crazy while watching Mad Men!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The most recent episode of Downton Abbey showed a new footman with hair very full on top and shaved on the sides, not a very credible haircut for the 1920s. Usually that show has a good sense of period, with wonderful costumes, although the writers sometimes use words from outside the period.

 

 

Actually that hairstyle did exist in the 1920s.

 

5666bdcda8c5da88c8ce33f20809e837.jpg

3680ee85d34d9f2fbb748b041510068e.jpg

mens-undercut-comb-over-1920s-men-hairst

richard.jpg

7cdde4aa0aba1ba7a1e07b239f847bb8.jpg

 

The so-called "undercut" that we see today is definitely a throwback to a style from the 1920s. 

It's also referred to as "prohibition chic."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmmm...I dunno ham. That looks like and I'm pretty sure that that is actor Richard Dix, and I've never thought he looked much like that crazy German f***** who sported that funny and stupid lookin' little mustache.

 

(...nope...I think you're lettin' the similar lookin' haircut overly influence your perception here, ol' buddy...heck, Moe Howard in those old WWII-themed Three Stooges shorts looked FAR more like that crazy German f***** than Dix ever did!!!)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmmm...I dunno ham. That looks like and I'm pretty sure that that is actor Richard Dix, and I've never thought he looked much like that crazy German f***** who sported that funny and stupid lookin' little mustache.

 

(...nope...I think you're lettin' the similar lookin' haircut overly influence your perception here, ol' buddy...heck, Moe Howard in those old WWII-themed Three Stooges shorts looked FAR more like that crazy German f***** than Dix ever did!!!)

 

Charlie Chaplin certainly didn't look like him. LOL!

 

Beside since when did either Dix or Hitler had hair like that! 

 

dictator%5B1%5D.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Charlie Chaplin certainly didn't look like him. LOL!

 

Beside since when did either Dix or Hitler had hair like that! 

 

dictator%5B1%5D.jpg

 

Yep, good point!

 

In fact and come to think of it, over the years there seems to have been many portrayals of that crazy German by actors who didn't look anything like him and yet somehow the producers of the films evidently thought all they had to do was paste that stupid-lookin' kind'a mustache on the actor's lip and they were good to go.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yep, good point!

 

In fact and come to think of it, over the years there seems to have been many portrayals of that crazy German by actors who didn't look anything like him and yet somehow the producers of the films evidently thought all they had to do was paste that stupid-lookin' kind'a mustache on the actor's lip and they were good to go.

Richard Basehart did his best, yet the fact remains that he did not look anything like Hitler.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Richard Basehart did his best, yet the fact remains that he did not look anything like Hitler.

 

One good lookalike  recently passed away in Uzbekistan, he is Alexander Shishkin.

 

So now we know how he looked if Hitler reached 80.

 

shishkin3.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...