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Why does TCM air more than one "premiere" on a single day?


JeanneCrain
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TCM fans love their premieres, many of which seldom re-air anytime soon upon the "classic" based channel.

 

Recently however, numerous TCM "premieres" have been and are scheduled to air upon the conclusion of the network’s annual "31 days of Oscars" event, an annual airing of Oscar related movies.

 

 

Needless to say, as loyal TCM fans know, "premieres" are typically "premium" viewings upon a "classic" movie network typically inundated with continuous re-runs of dated movie favorites.

 

The self-evident fact that premieres have never been previously aired coupled with the realities surrounding a low probability of being re-airing within the following 12-months along with the occasional network/provider technical difficulties in a high-tech satellite transmission world remaining at the mercy of inclemate weather conditions questions the scheduling logic of airing numerous highly prized premieres upon the same day when they could easily be scattered amongst the winds of the calendar’s days.

 

 

This longtime TCM viewer thus suggests that it would be more beneficial for the TCM community if no more than one “premiere” was aired upon a particular day and that such movies were scheduled for re-airing within the following 12-months of their premiere - if nothing more than to be properly ingested by viewers.

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I can not speak of why several premieres are scheduled for same day.

 

As for why some premieres are not scheduled again:

 

Will McKinley has excellent movie blog at: https://willmckinley.wordpress.com/

 

The entry for May 11, 2013 contains this: 

 

“We can’t license every classic movie ever made; financially, it’s impossible to do that,” Tabesh said during the Meet TCM Panel. “So we try to structure deals with all the studios where, in addition to the traditional way of licensing a film, say, for twelve months or two years, and getting a certain number of runs within that period of time, we say, ‘Let us also dip into your library for one run of a film maybe forty times per year.’ So we’ll go to Universal or Fox and we’ll say, ‘We’re not going to want to play this movie 12 times over the next two years. We’re just going to want to play it once when Bette Davis is our Star of the Month.’ And, by structuring our deals that way, that’s allowed us a lot more diversity and it’s allowed us to bring in films that we couldn’t.”

 

http://willmckinley.wordpress.com/2013/05/11/10-things-i-learned-at-the-tcm-classic-film-festival/

 

To have approx. forty such one-run movies each year means that they represent good percentage of premieres overall.

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TCM fans love their premieres, many of which seldom re-air anytime soon upon the "classic" based channel.

 

Recently however, numerous TCM "premieres" have been and are scheduled to air upon the conclusion of the network’s annual "31 days of Oscars" event, an annual airing of Oscar related movies.

 

 

Needless to say, as loyal TCM fans know, "premieres" are typically "premium" viewings upon a "classic" movie network typically inundated with continuous re-runs of dated movie favorites.

 

The self-evident fact that premieres have never been previously aired coupled with the realities surrounding a low probability of being re-airing within the following 12-months along with the occasional network/provider technical difficulties in a high-tech satellite transmission world remaining at the mercy of inclemate weather conditions questions the scheduling logic of airing numerous highly prized premieres upon the same day when they could easily be scattered amongst the winds of the calendar’s days.

 

 

This longtime TCM viewer thus suggests that it would be more beneficial for the TCM community if no more than one “premiere” was aired upon a particular day and that such movies were scheduled for re-airing within the following 12-months of their premiere - if nothing more than to be properly ingested by viewers.

 

In addition to what SansFin says, I think in this case you have to remember that many of these premieres in the past few days are for much more recent movies, whereas for most of the month we were getting the usual mix of films from earlier decades that are the usual staple fare.  It's not surprising that many of these newer films would fall into the one-and-done category and be crammed together within a short time frame, due to the chronological format of this year's Oscars programming.

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SansFin - appreciate the informative will mckinley link, a link aptly reminding us of the unfortunate library sellout, merge with the despicable time warner organization along with the film licensing “spider web”.

 

While being ignorant to the licensing details my contention that airing “premieres” on separate days remains, while there is nothing more frustrating than a storm interrupting a TCM provider’s transmission signal effectively wiping-out multiple premiere viewings in a single day.

 

Like the dreaded commercialized content broadcasting disease so prevalent in television, it is easy for paid viewers’ to deplore the business side of televised art whose future is becoming increasingly darker with viewer streaming options such as Nexflix.

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