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Great Triple Bill On TCM Tonight


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TCM is having a wonderful triple bill of movies on tonight.

 

At 8pm (EST) it's the 2011 Best picture Oscar winner, THE ARTIST, a stylish black-and-white silent film (with subtitles), dealing with the subject of a dashing silent leading man whose career slides downhill with the advent of talkies. Not a new subject matter, perhaps, but this time uniquely presented, with a wonderful performance by Jean Dujardin in the lead. This is a man who has a smile that truly dazzles.

 

VICTOR VICTORIA is the 10pm (EST) treat. Blake Edwards' sexual identity musical comedy ranks, for me, as a brilliant sophisticated joy, witty but also surprisingly affecting. It's a film with strong character development. As a film viewer who finds the usual sugary Julie Andrews image of the '60s a bit much, I love her in this film. Robert Preston gives one of the great perfromances of his career as a gay queen, imbuing the part with great humanity, James Garner is solid, and a blonde Lesley Ann Warren steals every scene she is in as Garner's wise cracking, brash companion.

 

Finally, at 12;30pm, in complete contrast in subject matter and presentation to the previous two films, there's NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN, the Coen Brothers Best Picture Oscar winner of 2007. It's a film that deals with a brand of violence that accompanies the drug wars of the American south west, with solid characterizations, as Josh Brolin plays a man who, by happen stance, encounters a desert drug scene gone wrong, and grabs a fortune in drug money in a suitcase. His problem is that he will then be relentlessly pursued by a cold blooded member of one of the drug gangs.

 

Tommy Lee Jones is terrific as the small town sheriff who doesn't understand the increasing violence of which some men are capable. Meanwhile, Javier Bardem gives a perfromance for the ages as the psychotic killer tracking Brolin. The chilling effectiveness of Bardem's portrayal is that he underplays his scenes so brilliantly. This is a man with the most casual attitude in the world about killing anyone that he may encounter, to the point that he will even have a potential victim make a heads-or-tails call on a coin toss to decide whether or not he will kill him.

 

My only criticism of this gripping film is the final ten to fifteen minutes in which the narrative of the film suddenly changes direction. A minor quibble, however. This gem should be seen but a caution, for those uncomfortable with screen violence, because the strong edginess of the film is due to Bardem's memorable portrayal of a maniac and the sudden violence that can occur. However, the Coen Brothers never overdo that violence. Unlike some other filmmakers depicting violent death, they never dwell upon it with graphic brutality.

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pardon, but online schedule shows...

10:00 PM
Color
115 min
TV-14
drama

When he's forced to take the throne, George VI approaches an unconventional therapist to cure his stammer.

DirTom Hooper CastColin Firth , Geoffrey Rush , Helena Bonham Carter .

 

@8pmET, THE ARTIST (2011), @10pm ET, THE KING'S SPEECH (2010), @12:30amET, NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN ('07), @2:45amET, THE QUEEN (2006)

(still a great lineup though) ;)

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pardon, but online schedule shows...

10:00 PM
Color

115 min

TV-14

drama

When he¿s forced to take the throne, George VI approaches an unconventional therapist to cure his stammer.

Dir: Tom Hooper Cast:  Colin Firth , Geoffrey Rush , Helena Bonham Carter .

 

@8pmET, THE ARTIST (2011), @10pm ET, THE KING'S SPEECH (2010), @12:30amET, NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN ('07), @2:45amET, THE QUEEN (2006)

(still a great lineup though) ;)

 

Victor Victoria is on the Canadian schedule.

 

Perhaps I could rent a room at some motel across the line for a few hours.. I would really prefer Victor Victoria - a great dramedy -  one of my favorites. 

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Sorry, I didn't realize that the American schedule had The King's Speech at 10pm, while Canadians are getting Victor Victoria. I have to say that i think Canada is getting the better film, for a change.

 

Still, much for all to appreciate tonight, both sides of the border.

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TCM is having a wonderful triple bill of movies on tonight.

 

At 8pm (EST) it's the 2011 Best picture Oscar winner, THE ARTIST, a stylish black-and-white silent film (with subtitles), dealing with the subject of a dashing silent leading man whose career slides downhill with the advent of talkies. Not a new subject matter, perhaps, but this time uniquely presented, with a wonderful performance by Jean Dujardin in the lead. This is a man who has a smile that truly dazzles.

 

 

Not to mention that Bérénice Bejo has a smile that could light up ten solar systems.

 

88446-29937.jpg

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At 8pm (EST) it's the 2011 Best picture Oscar winner, THE ARTIST, a stylish black-and-white silent film (with subtitles), dealing with the subject of a dashing silent leading man whose career slides downhill with the advent of talkies. Not a new subject matter, perhaps, but this time uniquely presented, with a wonderful performance by Jean Dujardin in the lead. This is a man who has a smile that truly dazzles.

 

THE ARTIST is a marvelously entertaining movie. Jean Dujardin is indeed wonderful as silent screen star George Valentin. His one line of spoken dialogue in the final moments of the movie reveal Valentin's thick French accent, explaining why he did not want to make talking pictures. The opening of THE ARTIST featuring the screening of Valentin's movie where his character is being tortured by enemy agents in an effort to make him "speak" is brilliant. The title reads "I will not utter one word!" 

Of course, we never hear any spoken dialogue from Bérénice Bejo, Dujardin's co-star, since Bejo's Peppy Miller is supposed to be an American "talkie" sensation.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f1-hDJMVA7M

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Not to mention that Bérénice Bejo has a smile that could light up ten solar systems.

 

88446-29937.jpg

Bejo also gives a charming, sensitive performance in The Artist.

 

A friend of mine (this is sooo typical of many, I know) frustrates me a little by refusing to watch The Artist because it's silent. (I wonder if she rejected a viewing of Mel Brooks' Silent Movie, as well).

 

The Artist is definitely one of my favourite films of recent years (acknowledging the fact that I haven't seen that many). It's a smart, clever film, beautiful to look at, with a highly effective performance by its French star, Jean Dujardin, a man who exudes personality and charisma just like, guess what, an old time movie star. Maybe that's why he's such great casting.

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Bejo also gives a charming, sensitive performance in The Artist.

 

A friend of mine (this is sooo typical of many, I know) frustrates me a little by refusing to watch The Artist because it's silent. (I wonder if she rejected a viewing of Mel Brooks' Silent Movie, as well).

 

The Artist is definitely one of my favourite films of recent years (acknowledging the fact that I haven't seen that many). It's a smart, clever film, beautiful to look at, with a highly effective performance by its French star, Jean Dujardin, a man who exudes personality and charisma just like, guess what, an old time movie star. Maybe that's why he's such great casting.

 

It may have to do with merely the power of suggestion, but one of the many things I loved about The Artist was the way that a cast of modern actors looked and acted so convincingly in the manner of "real" actors from the silent era.  The facial expressions and gestures and even the overall "look" of the actors, Dujardin and Goodman in particular, captured the feel of a classic silent movie beautifully.  I was more than a bit skeptical going into it, but it won me over completely.

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It may have to do with merely the power of suggestion, but one of the many things I loved about The Artist was the way that a cast of modern actors looked and acted so convincingly in the manner of "real" actors from the silent era.  The facial expressions and gestures and even the overall "look" of the actors, Dujardin and Goodman in particular, captured the feel of a classic silent movie beautifully.

 

I noticed that too. All the actors looked like they were real film people from the late 1920s. They did a really good job of making this look like a real old silent film, and.... it was a CODE film too. :)

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By the way, with top award-winning high-quality films like these, I don't mind seeing them on TCM even though they are modern. It's all the modern turkeys and low-budget modern films that I dislike.

 

The high quality films like these are probably expensive to rent, while the low-budget modern turkeys are probably cheap to rent, and they are the kinds I don't like to see on TCM

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Douglas Fairbanks, the silent king of Hollywood, has finally appeared in a Best Picture Oscar winner some 72 years after his death.

 

This occurs in The Artist in the scene in which a bitter George Valentin is viewing an old swashbuckler of himself at home. The brief action scenes shown are clearly shots of Fairbanks from the 1920 Mark of Zorro.

 

artist%203_zpsx9vcedea.jpg

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Don't like to say it, but that Moss boy was so dumb that he almost

deserved to die. Wise up, son.

Can't say that I agree with this statement at all. Josh Brolin has an independent, gutsy character to play, and brings a certain monosyllabic good ol' boy charm to the role. He's the protagonist in No Country for whom the audience is rooting.

 

As he sits on the edge of his bed, shotgun in hand, in that memorable scene in which he's figured that the merciless drug killer is sneaking up on his hotel door, Brolin's attitude is, "You want me? I'm ready for you. Let's get this thing over with." Of course the audience knows something that he doesn't - that he 's right in line for that door lock cylinder to suddenly fly across the room right into him. Moss is a man who's got guts and street smarts, trying his best to grab the big lottery ticket and freedom for life, even if it means putting his life on the line in the process.

 

I think a lot of viewers will understand the high risk taking of his character, even if they wouldn't have the nerve to do the same thing themselves. The recklessness of his behaviour, though, is that he also puts his wife in the line of fire, as well.

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Although I liked the film overall, I didnt like how they

 

 

SPOILER ALERT

 

 

killed off one of the main characters near the end and didnt even show it.  The first time I saw it, I wasnt sure who it was at first. Confusing and confounding as the plot revolved around this character and that big scene just happens off screen (or on the cutting room floor)..........as if it didnt really matter. Yet they show all these minor characters getting killed off throughout the film.........

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Things did move a little quickly toward the end of the movie and got a bit

confusing. I know I missed some of the dialogue when his mother-in-law

gives away his location to the other group of Mexicans. I just figured they

were going to kidnap her or something. Apparently that's how they found

out where he was staying. And then we find out she was killed too, though

that wasn't much of a surprise.

 

 

Yes, the way the film was cut towards the end left a lot to be desired....

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From what I've been reading about the film, the novel makes it

clearer as to what happened toward the end, more exposition

as to how Moss was found and killed by the Mexicans. Maybe

there were a few too many hotel and motel rooms to keep

straight toward the end. Still an excellent film.

 

 

Yeah, I agree. Still I think they could've made it clearer towards the end. Maybe they thought the film was too long or something.....

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I think the Coens decided, for whatever reason, to not show Moss

being killed. Maybe they felt doing it that way was somehow in sync

with the idea of fate or chance, we don't see everything directly, as

happens in real life. Who knows.

 

In more practical terms, I was also thinking if that deputy at the start

of the movie had handcuffed Bardem with his hands in back instead

in front, the deputy might have lived to see another day. But Bardem

seemed to be almost supernatural in his strength and cunning, he

probably would have found a way to kill him and escape anyway.

You can't keep a bad man down, especially this one.

 

 

No, LOL. The way it ends you get the feeling he still would've escaped somehow. Yeah, dunno if Coens meant something by cutting out the death that way or not..........

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I had never seen The Artist until Tuesday night, and I thoroughly enjoyed it.  Jean Dujardin reminded me of a Doug Fairbanks Sr. with his look in much of the film.  Other times, it seemed like he also had traces of George C. Scott and even Hart Bochner in him.  Berneice Bejo and John Goodman were also well adapted to the style of the picture, and at times, the dog did seem to steal the show!

 

I didn't stay up late enough to watch No Country For Old Men, but I had seen it before.  I hope TCM shows it again (and The Artist, for that matter)...sooner rather than later.

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No, LOL. The way it ends you get the feeling he still would've escaped somehow. Yeah, dunno if Coens meant something by cutting out the death that way or not..........

 

Did he kill the guy's wife or not? I didn't hear any gunshot.

 

It looks like the last 5 or 10 minutes of the film, and the very end, was setting everything up for a sequel.

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Did he kill the guy's wife or not? I didn't hear any gunshot.

 

 At first I assumed that he did kill her, but now I'm not so sure.I think the Coens leave it to the audience's imagination as to whether the wife is killed or not. A bit of a teaser from them.

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Did he kill the guy's wife or not? I didn't hear any gunshot.

 

It looks like the last 5 or 10 minutes of the film, and the very end, was setting everything up for a sequel.

assumed she was killed also, just because he 'owed' it to Lewellyn & his checking the bottom of his boots as he left the house ;)

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assumed she was killed also, just because he 'owed' it to Lewellyn & his checking the bottom of his boots as he left the house ;)

While it's still just a guessing game, I think it's easier to make a case that the wife did not survive that visit by the psychotic killer.

 

By the way, perhaps it will make viewers appreciate the performance of Kelly MacDonald, the actress who played Moss's wife with a perfect south west Texas accent, to know that in real life she speaks with a noteworthy Scottish accent. She gives a beautifully natural performance in No Country, though it's the three males leads in the film that dominate the proceedings. Nevertheless, she holds her own in her scenes with all three male actors in the film.

 

a0420d07-b0a2-4d77-acf4-b2274587df3e_zps

 

All the performances in No Country for Old Men are impressive. I thought Josh Brolin was perfect as Moss, convincingly portraying an independent soul with strong country smarts and a survivor instinct. He has a chance to get out of poverty and strike it big and he's going for it.

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Did he kill the guy's wife or not? I didn't hear any gunshot.

 

It looks like the last 5 or 10 minutes of the film, and the very end, was setting everything up for a sequel.

 

 

That's left up in the air. But i assume he did, since he had told her husband he would........

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