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Sped-Up Closing Credits for The King's Speech


sewhite2000
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I think a precedent was broken tonight: for the first time ever in TCM history, I believe the closing credits for a movie were sped up for time constraints. Now, most movies on TCM have incredibly short closing credits. If there are any at all, they usually list the cast and nothing else. But until tonight, TCM has always dutifully shown the closing credits at normal speed, even when they have aired more recent movies. Of course, for several decades now, every one who remotely had anything to do with a film, from the caterer to the stand-ins for the actors to the chauffeurs must be named in the closing credits, I assume because the multitude of unions in Hollywood demand it. And thus, closing credits for a modern movie can be five, six, seven, eight minutes long.

 

For the KING'S SPEECH, after the major contributors to the movie were named, TCM opted to zip through the rest of the closing credits. This is something that has been happening on most other networks for many years now, but it was a bit of a shock to me to see TCM fall in line with that trend. I guess such practice is acceptable as long as all the names appear on screen for even a fraction of a second, because I think it's been a good ten years now that other networks have been doing this.

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I think a precedent was broken tonight: for the first time ever in TCM history, I believe the closing credits for a movie were sped up for time constraints. Now, most movies on TCM have incredibly short closing credits. If there are any at all, they usually list the cast and nothing else. But until tonight, TCM has always dutifully shown the closing credits at normal speed, even when they have aired more recent movies. Of course, for several decades now, every one who remotely had anything to do with a film, from the caterer to the stand-ins for the actors to the chauffeurs must be named in the closing credits, I assume because the multitude of unions in Hollywood demand it. And thus, closing credits for a modern movie can be five, six, seven, eight minutes long.

 

For the KING'S SPEECH, after the major contributors to the movie were named, TCM opted to zip through the rest of the closing credits. This is something that has been happening on most other networks for many years now, but it was a bit of a shock to me to see TCM fall in line with that trend. I guess such practice is acceptable as long as all the names appear on screen for even a fraction of a second, because I think it's been a good ten years now that other networks have been doing this.

 

The credits for THE ARTIST moved by very quickly as well but It seemed to fit the tempo of the music that accompanied them.

I didn't see this movie theatrically so I don't know if they were sped up on TCM.

 

I hope sped up credits will not become common practice on TCM.

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I noticed this, too, but I doubt if this was anything of TCM's doing.

 

I hope not.

 

Speeding up closing credits and dropping out sound are all signs of a beginning disrespect for the product itself. That's not been TCM's m.o. in the past, so I'll just assume it has something to do with this special recent Oscar pics program and hope it's not a significant sign of anything to come.

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You'll notice on both The Artist and The King's Speech, the sound didn't drop out for announcements of upcoming programs, but had (presumably) the music from the original closing credits.  As the credits took less time, the music was cut off, at least for The King's Speech.

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Wow. That's shocking. I always thought TCM would broadcast movies as uncut/unedited as a theatrical release.

 

I'll bet it's the way the movie was sent to them from the distributor and TCM had nothing to do with it. But it's really sad to think whomever did speed up the credits, did so thinking no one cares to actually read them.

 

Don't you read the credits? I do!

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Let's hope it's an anomaly. TCM have always shown the proper respect for a film in its presentations in the past. Let's hope that they are not joining the pack of other channels that treat movies like a mere product.

 

By the way, those six or seven minute closing credits on modern films are murder to sit through and, at least on my television screen, all but impossible to read anyway. Nevertheless, I want a film presented as unaltered as possible from its original theatrical presentation. And, at least up until now, TCM has felt the same way, as well. One of the reasons I love them.

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I'm big on watching the closing credits. Or at least hanging in til they're over.

 

Even at home, if I've watched a film on TCM (it's useless to try credit viewing on other stations, except TVO), I usually leave the tv on til the credits are over. I don't always pay attention to them, but I leave it on because to me it's part of the movie, albeit the very very end.

 

In movie theatres, I'm a fanatic for staying right til the bitter end. This is because I want to retain that feeling that I've been in another world for as long as possible. If the film's affected me at all, I want to keep  the mood I derived from it for as long as possible.

 

Once you put on your coat and sally forth into the theatre lobby, that "feeling" starts to dissipate.

 

Also, often I want to read where the movie was made, and also the music credits. For some reason these two are usually put at the very end of the credits.

 

I can never understand everybody's hurry to leave. What if the movie had been 10 minutes longer (before the credits come up) ? They'd still be sitting there if that were the case.

 

When someone wants to get up and leave the instant the credits come up, it makes me think that they weren't much affected by what they just saw, they've already moved on and returned to the real world.

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I particularly like to check out song credits, which unfortunately, are always the final thing to scroll by, so unless I'm just in an absolute hurry to get somewhere, nine times out of 10, I stay through the closing credits. I am very frequently the last customer in the theater. Some of the modern movies, particularly the superhero ones, have a brief "stinger" scene that appears after the final credits have rolled, and large numbers of people will hang around in anticipation of those. But those are the exception, not the rule.

 

What has become annoying in recent years is the theaters I go to now send their cleaning crews in the second the closing credits start, not after the movie is completely over, which used to be the case. These are usually teenagers, who are having loud conversations while they do their work, so I'm not exactly able to have quiet contemplation about the movie I just saw while the credits are rolling. They also frequently string up those Velcro ropes across the entrance, so no one else can come in while they're cleaning, meaning I have to get one of them to let me out. They're always surprised to see someone still in the theater, meaning in their lifetimes, it's not a practice they comprehend or have witnessed at all.

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Oh, I also wanted to add I saw THE KING'S SPEECH in the theater, and the closing credits weren't sped up. I think union rules forbid such a practice in theatrical release, otherwise theaters would do it all the time. It's a concession they must have made for television, however. TV broadcasts, it appears, still have to show all the names, but they can time-compress the closing credits, and also shove the names off to the bottom or side of the screen while they show advertisements for their own network. I also think there must be some line of demarcation, because if it's a film that holds off showing the names of major contributors, i.e., the director, writer, actors, cinematographer, film editor, costumer, etc., until the closing credits, those names still appear at normal speed. But once the "scroll" begins of the secondary contributors, then the speed-up can begin. I think there must be certain rules in place for this, because all the networks seem to handle it in pretty much the same way.

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I'd never seen The King's Speech and so recorded it last night. Haven't watched it yet, but just checked the credits. A little fast -- but within the realm of what they might have done in the theater. The music that accompanies the credits is the right tempo; that wouldn't have been the case, if they sped up the credits.

 

Newer films (which TCM is showing more and more of) do seem to have endless credits. The old films may just repeat the cast, if we're lucky. The newer ones can have five to ten minutes of credits.

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It isnt just sped up credits, they shrink them in a box at the top of the screen so you cant even read them, while they have a commercial running at the bottom. Really kills the mood of the movie (talking about other stations now) I have to turn the sound off.

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I'm big on watching the closing credits. Or at least hanging in til they're over.

 

Even at home, if I've watched a film on TCM (it's useless to try credit viewing on other stations, except TVO), I usually leave the tv on til the credits are over. I don't always pay attention to them, but I leave it on because to me it's part of the movie, albeit the very very end.

 

In movie theatres, I'm a fanatic for staying right til the bitter end. This is because I want to retain that feeling that I've been in another world for as long as possible. If the film's affected me at all, I want to keep  the mood I derived from it for as long as possible.

 

Once you put on your coat and sally forth into the theatre lobby, that "feeling" starts to dissipate.

 

Also, often I want to read where the movie was made, and also the music credits. For some reason these two are usually put at the very end of the credits.

 

I can never understand everybody's hurry to leave. What if the movie had been 10 minutes longer (before the credits come up) ? They'd still be sitting there if that were the case.

 

When someone wants to get up and leave the instant the credits come up, it makes me think that they weren't much affected by what they just saw, they've already moved on and returned to the real world.

 

 

I also stick to the very end in most cases for the same reason (music and location credits.also sometimes the film is dedicated to someone) The only times I'll leave if I didnt like the movie that much, but even then I'll stay for most of the credits........

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The way TCM handled it was with more subtlety than would have happened with a movie airing on one of their sister networks, Swithin, but I promise you the credits were sped up at the end. I think the music was edited as well to make it less obvious.

 

 

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As WTVS....the PBS station here in Detroit reprised it's broadcast of the MOTOWN 25 special last night at the same time The King's Speech was on, I didn't get to see the speeded up credits.  I HAVE seen the movie before, and it's a good one, so...

 

MOTOWN simply won out!

 

 

Sepiatone

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I'm big on watching the closing credits. Or at least hanging in til they're over.

 

Even at home, if I've watched a film on TCM (it's useless to try credit viewing on other stations, except TVO), I usually leave the tv on til the credits are over. I don't always pay attention to them, but I leave it on because to me it's part of the movie, albeit the very very end.

 

In movie theatres, I'm a fanatic for staying right til the bitter end. This is because I want to retain that feeling that I've been in another world for as long as possible. If the film's affected me at all, I want to keep  the mood I derived from it for as long as possible.

 

Once you put on your coat and sally forth into the theatre lobby, that "feeling" starts to dissipate.

 

Also, often I want to read where the movie was made, and also the music credits. For some reason these two are usually put at the very end of the credits.

 

I can never understand everybody's hurry to leave. What if the movie had been 10 minutes longer (before the credits come up) ? They'd still be sitting there if that were the case.

 

When someone wants to get up and leave the instant the credits come up, it makes me think that they weren't much affected by what they just saw, they've already moved on and returned to the real world.

 

The last few times I've been to the theater to see a movie, I was with my kid. Everyone else in the theatre starts to move as soon as the credits begin to roll - all bunched up to each other making their way out of the rows and up the aisles. I just sit there like you, enjoying the closing music and reading some of the credits - in no hurry to jam myself into the slowly-moving crowd.

 

But my daughter always moves to get up, and when I don't she'll look at me quizzically. Like she thinks I'm a weirdo or something. I tell her to relax, there's no hurry. But I can tell she feels strange just sitting still while everyone else is exiting and I usually give in before the credits are done and say "okay, let's go".

 

When I watch a movie at home, I usually do as you - let the closing music play on to the very end and just lounge in the feeling of the entire movie.

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Yeah, I know, I always experience that when I attend a movie with someone else, too.

 

I always think, "If I just sit here looking at the screen, my friend/husband/son/daughter will get the hint and will also sit quietly til the credits are over".

But it never works. Even my husband, who knows my predilection for hanging in for the credits, starts putting on his coat and generally fidgeting about once the credits start rolling. Once we almost had a fight about this.

He claims that he starts to feel uncomfortable, ending up being the only two people in the theatre by the time the credits are finished.

 

Evidently your daughter feels the same way.

It's too bad...why should people feel pressured to leave the instant the credits come up?

 

For me it isn't just to see the soundtrack and location info, and to "retain the mood", though.  I agree, why bustle through the crowd when, if you wait just five minutes, you can easily walk out jostle-free? I tend to just stay in my seat at the end of plays and concerts too, for the same reason (obviously there's no credits with them.)

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Yeah, I know, I always experience that when I attend a movie with someone else, too.

 

I always think, "If I just sit here looking at the screen, my friend/husband/son/daughter will get the hint and will also sit quietly til the credits are over".

But it never works. Even my husband, who knows my predilection for hanging in for the credits, starts putting on his coat and generally fidgeting about once the credits start rolling. Once we almost had a fight about this.

He claims that he starts to feel uncomfortable, ending up being the only two people in the theatre by the time the credits are finished.

 

Evidently your daughter feels the same way.

It's too bad...why should people feel pressured to leave the instant the credits come up?

 

For me it isn't just to see the soundtrack and location info, and to "retain the mood", though.  I agree, why bustle through the crowd when, if you wait just five minutes, you can easily walk out jostle-free? I tend to just stay in my seat at the end of plays and concerts too, for the same reason (obviously there's no credits with them.)

 

I long for the old days of movie theaters - my "career" back in the mid 60's to early 70's. Many were the nights when only a couple of people would sit til the end of the credits, but we'd dutifully leave the lights down for them; we'd stand at the top of the aisle waiting for the complete end. At the very end, we'd play the national anthem over an on-screen visual of the Canadian flag - and some patrons would stand still (not all) but we, the staff, always would. This was the way - every night, 365 times a year.

 

So much do I revere those days that I dream of them a couple of times a year. In those dreams I'm gloriously happy, and at the realization that I'm dreaming - as it ends - the sadness of loss is momentarily overwhelming. But if I could, I'd dream of it every night.

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Sped up credits don't bother me a bit,  I can settle for Th-th-th-th-th-that's allFolks!

It appears that's how the studios are doing some of them now. I've seen them sped up on DVDs too which makes absolutely no sense at all. If you don't want to watch them hit "eject".

 

What really gets me is when some of the networks reformat them into a tiny, tiny, box and and run them over the bottom of the last 15 seconds of the movie or TV show.

 

I know why they do it. Usually, their lease agreements with the studios require they run the credits, but the catch is that there's nothing in it that says how they do it. Of course, the studios don't really care if you can read them or not, it's a requirement in their contracts with the various actors and production unions.

 

I doubt it's anything TCM has control over.

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Like many have already commented here, I likewise sit till the credits and music have ended and the isle lights brighten before standing up to depart.

If it's a good movie, that's "moved" me, I want to hear the complete score, and catch some of those little informative details that may only be found in those end credits. 

When my daughter used to sit on my lap in the theater she learned from me that this was part of the complete movie experience.

When I infrequently go to the theatre with someone these days, I warn them beforehand that I stay till the end.

 

I abhor the practice described here on comercial television, which is one of the reasons why I seldom watch it. I'd say that over 99 percent of my television viewing is on two channels, PBS and TCM (which receives the overwhelming lion's share of my sit-down time at home).

 

I cannot comment on the theatrical run time of THE ARTIST, which others have said had sped up credits, as last night was the first time that I saw it.

(see RayFiola's thread: http://forums.tcm.com/index.php?/topic/52370-the-artist-on-tcm/ )

However I do have commercial DVDs of the other TCM premiers and I can say that the DVD run time of THE KING'S SPEECH was 119 min, whereas TCMs broadcast was 115 min. That's about a 4 min difference in sped up credits. The DVD run time of NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN was 122 min, the same as the TCM broadcast. And the DVD run time for THE QUEEN was 103 min, also the same as the TCM broadcast.

 

Although TA was French, and both TKS & TQ were British, I believe that all four films were afiliated with Miramax Films. Miramax is an American entertainment company known for distributing independent and foreign films. It was founded in 1979 by the Weinstein brothers with current headquarters located in Santa Monica, California. Disney controlled Miramax from 1993-2010, and the Weinstein's continued to run it until 2005. Some of the other films shown this week (SHAKESPEARE IN LOVE, CHICAGO,) were also from Miramax. Throughout Miramax's history there have been many affiliations, including Paramount, Lions Gate,  Dimension, Buena Vista, Marvel, Touchstone, StudioCanal, Alliance, Disney, & Warner (to name a few). And the Weinstein's have been criticized for "reediting" some of "their" foreign films before distribution.

 

It appears that TCM cut a deal with Miramax to gain access to a few of these titles from their library for us to see.

Apparently the first two films shown primetime last night had their end credits "edited" for commercial television speed, though the last two films apparantly were not.

It is doubtful to me that TCM had anything to do with this themselves, though whether or not the TCM film acquistion dept and programers were aware of these "edits" before broadcast is anyone's guess.

 

We've had this discussion before, in other threads, and the end conclusions have always been that TCM doesn't do this themselves, and their "goal" is to present the most complete "unedited" version of whatever they show us. I believe that for the most part they are successful in achieving this goal. However, because TCM does not control every film that they broadcast they are sometimes at the mercy of the distributors as to the condition of what they show.

There have been budget cut backs, and though the cuts to TCM staff have apparently been the least of those experienced by the Turner Broadcasting system (controlled by Time Warner), none-the-less, some staff has been lost, so perhaps oversight has been affected more than previously.

Regardless, every now and then the dedicated and astute TCM viewers become aware that the films they are seeing on TCM are sometimes "not quite all there."

Some of us become quite alarmed, fearing that this may become a trend, and that TCM is going the way of her sister networks. While the majority of us take these relatively infrequent occurances in stride, and adapt a "wait and see" attitude.

No policy is written in stone and nothing lasts forever. No one can be certain of what the future might one day bring, but I feel quite confident that if a time comes that these occurrances become the "rule" rather than the "exception" that there will be a general cry of alarm from most everyone on these boards.

In the meantime, I will be appreciating what I have, for as long as I have it, and be grateful that TCM is able to do the job that it does, as well as it does, with the staff that it has.  

Fortunetly, when these "mishaps" do occur, no lives are lost and no one is maimed.

As Hitchcock used to say in perspective... "It's only a mooovee." :)

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