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What actor can you just not "get into" even though you want to?


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It's true that he would have been better than Ford in that forgettable remake, but while Sinatra was maybe the greatest entertainer of the 20th century, as a Runyon archetype he couldn't hold a candle to Warren William. 

 

NO CONTEST, BOYS----NO CONTEST

 

 

While I'll agree that WW in the original film would have been a hard act to top or even equal in any remake Andy, with this response of yours, you had me wondering which actor other than Sinatra and who was a big name in the late-'50s and early-'60's might have also been better cast than Ford and to credibly play the Dave the Dude character in Capra's remake.

 

And so, whaddaya think of maybe a fresh off his Oscar-winning "slick, smooth operator" title role in Elmer Gantry...Burt Lancaster?

 

(...not bad, eh?!)

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Thank you.  Looks like she made quite a few films with William Powell who I do like.  I'll have to look out for those.  Looks like she was in a lot of pre-codes.  I haven't seen very many of those and of the ones I've seen, I've found them all to be very interesting, even if the movie itself isn't that great, just the things that filmmakers could get away with prior to the Production Code going into effect in 1934 is pretty fun to see.

 

Yeah, many of her films were the weepie, soapy sort, but there were some gems in the mix. I wouldnt judge her by Another Dawn though. Some of her earlier stuff is much better.

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Seems that Glenn Ford turned his acting attentions abrubtly to television in the 1970s.  'JARRETT' (1973-Tvm) was a busted pilot movie.  Ford was an insurance investigator seeking out rare Biblical scrolls which were pilfered by the erudite Anthony Quayle.  Wouldn't surprise in the least if 'PUNCH AND JODY' was another busted pilot. 

 

     I saw Julie Harris on 'MATCH GAME 75' and she talked about the Tv show she was starring in w/Glenn Ford.  I think it was called 'The Family Holvak' and Ford was a preacher.  I reckon the pilot movie had been picked up for a series, but I don't think it lasted long. 

 

     Of course, movie stars like HENRY FONDA, JAMES STEWART and ROBERT MITCHUM had little success with weekly series, either, so Ford was in good company!  Remember the 1990 or '91 Mitchum sit-com "A Family For Joe" (or some such)?  It was toast and I can barely recall it.  > Not to worry, though, Mitchum's career "recovered" well enough for him to star in the 1994 comedy "BACKFIRE!" with supermodel Kathy Ireland, Telly Savalas and Shelley Winters.  I remember seeing "Backfire!" on video shelves in the mid-1990s.  I can only assume it did not achieve a wide-ranging or long-term theatrical release cos I'd never heard of it before I spotted it languishing on the 'New Release' shelf in my local Blockbuster way back when.       

 

    (Poster Boy For Starring In Failed Tv Shows:  McLEAN STEVENSON.  Leaving M*A*S*H did not turn out well for McLean.  I recall at least 4 failed series he appeared in after leaving MASH; there might have been 5 . . . poor McLean.  And ROB LOWE can't be far behind Mr. Stevenson.  I think Creepy Rob had the unique pleasure of starring in two failed series in but one television season).   

 

 

 

OMG! Robert Mitchum in a sitcom?? Now HOW did I miss that??????? Something tells me it wasnt on too long...........(LOL)

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While I'll agree that WW in the original film would have been a hard act to top or even equal in any remake Andy, with this response of yours, you had me wondering which actor other than Sinatra and who was a big name in the late-'50s and early-'60's might have also been better cast than Ford and to credibly play the Dave the Dude character in Capra's remake.

 

And so, whaddaya think of maybe a fresh off his Oscar-winning "slick, smooth operator" title role in Elmer Gantry...Burt Lancaster?

 

(...not bad, eh?!)

 

Lancaster's one of the great actors of the 20th century, and if the setting had been in a small town or mid-sized city, then sure, he'd be fine. 

 

But not on Runyon's Broadway.  The difference between the two is that while Lancaster can play a con man or "dude" quite convincingly, you need only take one look at the mustachioed William to know his heart is 99.44% pure larceny, with the remaining 00.56% reserved for Apple Annie.  Lancaster just looks   too  g o d d a m   wholesome for the part----great as a snake oil or Jesus salesman in Oklahoma or Mintysoda, but not as Dave the Dude in Times Square.

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Lancaster's one of the great actors of the 20th century, and if the setting had been in a small town or mid-sized city, then sure, he'd be fine. 

 

But not on Runyon's Broadway.  The difference between the two is that while Lancaster can play a con man or "dude" quite convincingly, you need only take one look at the mustachioed William to know his heart is 99.44% pure larceny, with the remaining 00.56% reserved for Apple Annie.  Lancaster just looks   too  g o d d a m   wholesome for the part----great as a snake oil or Jesus salesman in Oklahoma or Mintysoda, but not as Dave the Dude in Times Square.

 

And yet...and YET ironically Burt WAS NYC born and bred and attended NYU.

 

Yeah, I thought you might say what you said here, and in fact I have to admit I was kind'a thinking the same thing as I entered that post to you.

 

(...funny how Lancaster never came across as a big city New Yawker but as some guy from the Midwest, isn't it Andy?!...I wonder why that is?)

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I  started to be interested in Glenn Ford only 8 or 9 years ago,i watched about 70 of his films since,his overall output is pretty good,i never considered him a `WOODEN TYPE' more similar to Gary Cooper who was also labeled before as wooden, anybody who worked with Cooper always mentionned he was a great actor,i feel Glenn Ford would get similar praise from his fellow actors,Teahouse of the August Moon is a great comedy but Paul Ford stole the movie,he was reprising his Broadway role,for me a wooden actor is George Raft who did a fantastic job for the career of Humphrey Bogart by turning down many parts that went-luckily-to Bogie.I think Glenn Ford  is underated and he is by far the fastest draw in any western movie,just watch him...

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Hibi:  You're right that Robert Mitchum's 1990 sitcom didn't last long.  

 

    Also, if you want to watch Mitchum go "Guantanamo" with construction equipment watch the 1977 movie "THE AMSTERDAM KILL".  Without spelling out the plot or the reason why Mitchum gets in to an earthmover and takes aim at destroying a whole mess of greenhouses.  Also stars Bradford Dillman, Leslie Nielsen as an oily government agent, Richard Egan, Keye Luke and George Kee Cheung.  Nielsen's fun in this; you just can't tell whether his character is to be trusted or not.   

----------------------------------------------------

     I can't think of any "classic" actors I don't like. 

 

     I can think of some contemporary actors I could do without, but they're not even worth mentioning as I consider them a waste of space.   

 

        

 

    

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And yet...and YET ironically Burt WAS NYC born and bred and attended NYU.

 

Yeah, I thought you might say what you said here, and in fact I have to admit I was kind'a thinking the same thing as I entered that post to you.

 

(...funny how Lancaster never came across as a big city New Yawker but as some guy from the Midwest, isn't it Andy?!...I wonder why that is?)

 

Maybe it's just that blond and blue eyed New Yawkers are few and far between. 

 

And beyond that, can you even imagine Burt ever saying "SkWURR-ull" instead of "squirrel"?  Or "huh" instead of "her", the way George Costanza does?

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I always wanted to "get into" Sophia Loren.

Claudia Cardinale was probably the most beautiful woman I have ever seen in person.  She happened to be seated at the next table in a restaurant in Montreal about 1983.  She may have been in town for the film festival?  Sergio was also in town shooting Once Upon a Time in America.

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Dan Duryea, I could never cotton to his Western characters they seemed a bit off, too sleazy for Westerns, then I saw his Film Noirs and it all clicked he was a perfect slimy sleazy criminal/com man type. You can go ditto with that for Zachary Scott. 

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Broderick Crawford, the way he talks always too fast,Debbie Reynolds,Van Johnson,Red Skelton, any musicals,Bing Crosby & Bob Hope together and solo,Robert Vaughn thank God he was mostly on tv,Robert Stack always the same in every movie,same particular walk,watch his right arm always the same type of move, i liked him when i saw the Untouchables but i did not know he was the same for all his career before he starred in the show.Wallace Beery when a kid is in the plot-too many  films with usual story line.

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Well, he did make a fair number of films...and TCM is devoting a Saturday night in June to his film legacy.

 

Robert Vaughn is great as far as I'm concerned. Been a fan since 1960. Saw everything he was in from 'No Time to Be Young' right through to 'Battle Beyond the Stars'. Kinda lost track of him after that.

 

I've been waiting for years for TCM to show 'The Bridge at Remagen' (1969).

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Robert Vaughn is great as far as I'm concerned. Been a fan since 1960. Saw everything he was in from 'No Time to Be Young' right through to 'Battle Beyond the Stars'. Kinda lost track of him after that.

 

I've been waiting for years for TCM to show 'The Bridge at Remagen' (1969).

I admire him as an actor, too. I really like his early film work before he fell into the television rut-- THE YOUNG PHILADELPHIANS (he was Oscar-nominated); and he's very impressive in GOOD DAY FOR A HANGING, a Columbia western with Fred MacMurray as a sheriff and Vaughn as a criminal.

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Well, he did make a fair number of films...and TCM is devoting a Saturday night in June to his film legacy.

i know he did several movies...he was so good in movies  he switched to tv in his prime and stayed there,A question of taste i guess, a one note actor as far as i'am concerned,Many veterans of the Silver Screen did tv movies that is correct but for me Robert Vaughn is a tv actor and i never liked him even in Man fron U.n.c.l.e.As for a TCM tribute to him fine for him if there are showing Bridge at Remagen i have  seen it before and the Star is George Segal,very good in it,i do not remember Vaughn as so good in it anyway.,i have TCM since 2004 i personnally think they are slipping but it is only my opinion,i cannot stand musicals except for Ginger Rogers with Astaire but i feel in the last year or so there is way too many shown.on a regular basis.

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i know he did several movies...he was so good in movies  he switched to tv in his prime and stayed there,A question of taste i guess, a one note actor as far as i'am concerned,Many veterans of the Silver Screen did tv movies that is correct but for me Robert Vaughn is a tv actor and i never liked him even in Man fron U.n.c.l.e.As for a TCM tribute to him fine for him if there are showing Bridge at Remagen i have  seen it before and the Star is George Segal,very good in it,i do not remember Vaughn as so good in it anyway.,i have TCM since 2004 i personnally think they are slipping but it is only my opinion,i cannot stand musicals except for Ginger Rogers with Astaire but i feel in the last year or so there is way too many shown.on a regular basis.

I think you may be over-associating Vaughn with an iconic television role that you do not like and was but one tiny sliver of his overall career. Many silver screen actors were never nominated for Oscars like he was; nor did many have the type of longevity he had in movies, on TV and on stage. He had ups and downs like many performers, but it still does not diminish the lasting quality of some of his screen work, which is quite excellent.

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I think you may be over-associating Vaughn with an iconic television role that you do not like and was but one tiny sliver of his overall career. Many silver screen actors were never nominated for Oscars like he was; nor did many have the type of longevity he had in movies, on TV and on stage. He had ups and downs like many performers, but it still does not diminish the lasting quality of some of his screen work, which is quite excellent.

HI, no i was not traumatized by his role of Napoleon Solo,he always sounded and looked full of himself and many people felt that,His talent is-was limited and an OSCAR nomination does not give you instant talent,otherwise Cary Grant would have won 7 OSCARS, he never got one while he was very active.I am trying to remember if TCM ever did  RIN TIN TIN as  Star of the month,if not,well it is about time...

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HI, no i was not traumatized by his role of Napoleon Solo,he always sounded and looked full of himself and many people felt that,His talent is-was limited and an OSCAR nomination does not give you instant talent,otherwise Cary Grant would have won 7 OSCARS, he never got one while he was very active.I am trying to remember if TCM ever did  RIN TIN TIN as  Star of the month,if not,well it is about time...

Funny! I do think TCM should show one RIN TIN TIN movie during the 31 Days of Oscar. After all, Rinty was the first performer chosen for an Oscar...

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I always thought that without Vaughn's great portrayal of the dislikable ladder-climbing politico which Steve McQueen plays off of so well as a counterpoint, the only memorable thing about BULLITT would have probably been that classic car chase through the city of San Francisco.

 

And in fact, after his stint as television's Napoleon Solo and when Vaughn returned to the big screen, I was never either let-down or bored whenever I saw Vaughn playing the villain or untrustworthy type during that period of his career.

 

(...nope never...he always seemed well-cast in those roles and I thought would usually nailed the part by slightly underplaying it so effectively)

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I always thought that without Vaughn's great portrayal of the dislikable ladder-climbing politico which Steve McQueen plays off of so well as a counterpoint, the only memorable thing about BULLITT would have probably been that classic car chase through the city of San Francisco.

 

And in fact, after his stint as television's Napoleon Solo and when Vaughn returned to the big screen, I was never either let-down or bored whenever I saw Vaughn playing the villain or untrustworthy type during that period of his career.

 

(...nope never...he always seemed well-cast in those roles and I thought would usually nailed the part by slightly underplaying it so effectively)

 

Yep. Never boring.

 

Among his memorable roles, I'll always favor his uncredited role as Proteus in 'Demon Seed'. He had the perfect voice for that and pretty much stole the movie with it.

 

And I think he played the best Casca ever in the 1970 'Julius Caesar'.

 

A bizarre moment that's lived long in my memory was in 'The Big Show' (1961) wherein he was eaten - head first - by a polar bear! Now, that's entertainment!

 

To this day, I look for Vaughn movies to watch. Love that guy.

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