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"That Word!"-----AGAIN!


Sepiatone
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Last night, I forgot "The Ghost And Mrs.Muir" was on and switched over just at the part where Captain Gregg was dictating the novel to Lucia, and she put up a slight protest at the using of---"That WORD!"

 

Now, I've started a thread about this some time ago, and NObody seen fit to at least have the courtesy to reply either way....

 

So, I'll ask again....

 

Does ANYbody have the slightest idea WHAT "that word" could have possibly BEEN? 

 

Now, one might think it could have been the "F" word, given that when Lucy gave in and typed it, we only heard FOUR clicks of the typewriter.  But also, given both the times in which the movie was made, AND the times in which the STORY takes place, this might not be the correct assuption.

 

Any ideas out there?

 

 

Sepiatone

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Well Sepia, seein' as how I don't want to continue to be "discourteous" to ya here, and so even though it's been a few years since I've watched this Harrison/Tierney flick and thus the following is just a guess on my part, perhaps the word in question was the "B" word? That would be the "B" word as in "bloody", and considering the ghostly sea captain was British.

 

(...remember here, back in the day the use of that word as an catch-all adjective was also frowned upon in polite society)

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Four clicks--- The word is probably a simple D-A-M-N.  That word would get published probably but no gentleman or even a seafaring captain would have used the F*** word around a lady in those days and the F*** word would most certainly have not been published even in a book about sailors in those times.  Just a simple D-A-M-N. 

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Four clicks--- The word is probably a simple D-A-M-N.  That word would get published probably but no gentleman or even a seafaring captain would have used the F*** word around a lady in those days and the F*** word would most certainly have not been published even in a book about sailors in those times.  Just a simple D-A-M-N. 

Of course the word is D-A-M-N.  Can't you just hear Rex Harrison saying:  "D-a-m-n, d-a-m-n, d-a-m-n, d-a-m-n!  I've grown accustomed to her face!"  :P

 

Seriously, though,  I really do agree with "riverrocks" that the 4-letter word is probably "d-a-m-n" .  Just the sort of word that the grumpy old sea captain would use...

Edited by LittleAbner
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Of course the word is D-A-M-N.  Can't you just hear Rex Harrison saying:  "D-a-m-n, d-a-m-n, d-a-m-n, d-a-m-n!  I've grown accustomed to her face!"  :P

 

Seriously, though,  I really do agree with "riverrocks" that the 4-letter word is probably "d-a-m-n" .  Just the sort of word that the grumpy old sea captain would use...

Of course?  You've been privy to information no one else has?

 

Then again, there's the possibility that it might have been a referrence to a word long out of common lexicon by the time the movie was made, but quite common for the times the story took place.  And if we heard that word today, it might leave us wonder what all the fuss was?

 

Also, there might NOT have been a word in mind at all!  I've not read the book and don't know if the scene to which I refer even took place in it, but the possibility could be the whole thing was a ruse to get the audience thinking and form a definite opinion as to the Captain's personality.

 

 

Sepiatone

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Four clicks--- The word is probably a simple D-A-M-N.  That word would get published probably but no gentleman or even a seafaring captain would have used the F*** word around a lady in those days and the F*** word would most certainly have not been published even in a book about sailors in those times.  Just a simple D-A-M-N. 

 

 

I agree.

 

However, Hollywood screenwriters sometimes used the technique of not defining something and allowing different members of the audience to make up their own word or situation.

 

For example, there is a Maurice Chevalier pre-code in which he spends some time inside a ladies bedroom, then he comes out and talks to the camera (the audience). He said something like, "What did I do in there? Was it improper? Well, I did exactly what you would have done." This leaves it up to each man in the audience to make up his own version of what happened. My personal version would have been censored from the movie.

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Cursing, foul language, whatever you want to call it,  is certainly  nothing new.  Youtube has examples of bloopers and out takes from films. Some dvd s  have outtakes in their 'extras' features.  And that gal that so many of us love so much, Carole Lombard, was well known for her salty language. I'm sure others (Bette Davis for an  easy example) were just as "bad". In defense of Carole, I believe she was very sensitive to who was in ear shot of her , like kids, etc.

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Back in the '40s, did guys regularly use the "f" word in conversations among themselves?.........as in, "That Edward G. f***ing Robinson, he sure can act!"

 

 

Seriously. I think this is a good question. Anyone know?

 

I would guess so, DGF, and considering that when WWII G.I.s watched those cartoon training films made at WB's Termite Terrace, most of the said G.I.s probably knew that that clumsy little cartoon private's name of an acronym they were watching DIDN'T stand for "Situation Normal, All FOULED Up", or that when something went south on 'em, THAT acronym didn't stand for "FOULED Up Beyond All Repair"...right?!

 

(...well, okay...maybe the more "genteel and refined" of the G.I.s might have thought that, but in general probably not)

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DownGoesFrazier, on 10 Mar 2015 - 09:54 AM, said:snapback.png

 

 

 

I would guess so, DGF, and considering that when WWII G.I.s watched those cartoon training films made at WB's Termite Terrace, most of the said G.I.s probably knew that that little clumsy cartoon private's name of an acronym DIDN'T stand for "Situation Normal, All FOULED Up", or that when something went south on 'em, THAT acronym didn't stand for "FOULED Up Beyond All Repair"...right?!

 

F***ing  A.

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  • 1 month later...

As I recorded it yesterday, I decided to watch it again.  I do think she actually types out the word.  I always thought it was 'damn.'   Now I think it's entirely different.  It's a much stronger and coarser word.  You can guess it from the position on the keyboard of her strikes:  left, center, right, and center.

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I have actually had conversations about "salty language" use in recent US history. From what I can gather, yes, it was used in conversation by some people. Typically men and typically when no ladies or children were around- like in the military, pool rooms, saloons and that sort of thing.

 

There was more of a distinct class separation between "nice" people and "not nice" people. Nice people were conscientious of offending others. Women & children were considered delicate, and most men kept that kind of talk away from them. That's why ladies didn't go to bars or even sit on stools. Diners used to advertise LADIES WELCOME & BOOTH SERVICE on their outside panels.

 

If a woman or teen uttered swear words they were immediately labeled as "low class" or "poorly educated" or "badly raised" unless beautiful like Lombard, who seemed to get away with it. In her case, swearing was considered "daring".

 

But girls in real life were branded as fast, loose & easy if they spoke like that. And of course, back then, fast, loose & easy wasn't a desirable way for a woman to be seen.

 

This class distinction is exactly what made bad behaviour & it's trappings, like swearing & cigarettes, attractive to teens like the Dead End Kids. Thankfully, you never hear them swear in the movies.

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I have actually had conversations about "salty language" use in recent US history. From what I can gather, yes, it was used in conversation by some people. Typically men and typically when no ladies or children were around- like in the military, pool rooms, saloons and that sort of thing.

 

There was more of a distinct class separation between "nice" people and "not nice" people. Nice people were conscientious of offending others. Women & children were considered delicate, and most men kept that kind of talk away from them. That's why ladies didn't go to bars or even sit on stools. Diners used to advertise LADIES WELCOME & BOOTH SERVICE on their outside panels.

 

If a woman or teen uttered swear words they were immediately labeled as "low class" or "poorly educated" or "badly raised" unless beautiful like Lombard, who seemed to get away with it. In her case, swearing was considered "daring".

 

But girls in real life were branded as fast, loose & easy if they spoke like that. And of course, back then, fast, loose & easy wasn't a desirable way for a woman to be seen.

 

This class distinction is exactly what made bad behaviour & it's trappings, like swearing & cigarettes, attractive to teens like the Dead End Kids. Thankfully, you never hear them swear in the movies.

The "f" word adds spice to a conversation if used occasionally and judiciously. There are people who use it every other word, which is worse than offensive.

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As I recorded it yesterday, I decided to watch it again.  I do think she actually types out the word.  I always thought it was 'damn.'   Now I think it's entirely different.  It's a much stronger and coarser word.  You can guess it from the position on the keyboard of her strikes:  left, center, right, and center.

:lol:

OUR right and left?

 

Or....HERS? :P

 

 

Sepiatone

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there must be about a dozen sub-groupings

 

.....for EVERYTHING these days including music, movies, clothing styles and the like. Ever hear a kid say "I'm a comic book fan"? No, they say "I'm a retro Goth graphic novel cosplay fan"

 

I asked a group of teens if they wanted to join me at a horror film festival.

"What KIND of horror?" 

Retro, Grindhouse, Slasher, Fantasy, Zombie, Monster or Paranormal? Oy.

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They've proliferated like weeds. Alt country, Americana, all the different

kinds of metal--speed, death, etc. I don't listen to much metal anymore,

but there must be about a dozen sub-groupings. Power pop is one I

remember--people like Lowe and Edmunds. Then there are groups

that fall into three or four different categories. Maybe it's best just to

do the 'I know it when I hear it' thing

...and Bowie falls into any category he wants to.

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Yep, as soon as he made two albums in one category it was time to

move on, though I'm guessing he'd rather forget the Tin Machine

years. I still like the early to mid/late 1970s Bowie--glam, blue-eyed

soul, Eno music for Berlin airports.

The Bowie song that runs through my head more than any other is, surprisingly, "Time Will Crawl" (1987)

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