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The Thomas Crown Affair--Stylish Movie


slaytonf
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In fact, the most stylish.  I can't think of a sharper, more chic movie.  Vicky Anderson's entrance is thrilling, one of my favorite in movies.  And who wouldn't kill for Mr. Crown's home?  The movie still tells people about refinement, polish, understatement.  Steve McQueen in his accustomed role of cool protagonist, in control, exuding masculinity.  Faye Dunaway in hers of a powerful woman ultimately defeated, or destroyed, dripping sexuality.  Definite chemistry there.   And don't forget Paul Burke, company man, organization man, but no fool, and not a square--who has the hots for Vicky (something I suspect she does not disdain, but files away for the future, in consideration of the present business).

 

It occurs to me that movies where style, and a chic image are prominent tend to be caper movies, or adventure/thrillers.  Perhaps it's because the characters in them skirt, or transgress, the boundaries of respectability and convention.  It takes a certain self-assuredness to do that.  And isn't that what being stylish requires?  And pulling-off (or nearly so) a caper, or dealing with danger or adventure, requires refinement, judgement, taste.  Perhaps not taste, but certainly ability, intelligence, discernment.

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When I first saw this film, I had already seen (and been a fan of) the 1999 remake with Pierce Brosnan and Rene Russo.  Upon initial viewing, I found the original version tedious and boring, in comparison with the flashier newer movie.  Since then I had regarded the remake as an improvement.

 

Tonight, I gave this film another shot.  I've recently become more interested in Faye Dunaway's work.  She had really impressed me in Network and I love her campiness and ridiculousness in Mommie Dearest.  Upon a second viewing, I think I'm going to have to retract my initial opinion of this film versus the remake. 

 

I agree with slayton's opinion regarding the overall aesthetic of this film. This is a cool film.  I loved how sleek, sexy, just plain stylish this film is.  While the remake's sexiness is more explicit, I like the more subtle (but somehow still overt) sexiness displayed by Steve McQueen and Dunaway.  The chess scene is definitely one of the sexiest scenes I've seen in film.  The remake seems to have traded the stylish aesthetics of this film for more explicit sexiness and flashier scenery overall.  I do think that the remake improved upon the overall execution of the heist. 

 

I don't think either version is better than the other, they're just different.  However, I think I can now say that I no longer find the original film dull.  This film is just one among many that require second (or third or more) looks to catch everything and get caught up in the cool factor. 

 

I do love the 1960s heist films (with the exception of The Pink Panther and with the exception of David Niven, but I find Peter Sellers horribly annoying).  Heist films (whether they're more comedic or more action packed) are always so much fun and I'm always rooting for the heist to come off successfully.  I loved How to Steal a Million with Audrey Hepburn and Peter O'Toole.  Gambit with Michael Caine and Shirley MacLaine was also a lot of fun.  These films always have such great music and for whatever reason, great fashions. 

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I love this movie very much! I feel it is very nearly perfect in all ways.

 

He has overcome the suit which traps so many. She is feline on the prowl.

 

I believe the ending is pure perfection. It led us to wonder if she would betray him or if they would live happily ever after with ill-gotten gains. There was no hint that there was third option but it is so very true to his personality to do such a thing that I felt a fool for not foreseeing it.

 

I feel the true tragedy in the movie is that she kept to her persona rather than running away with Steve McQueen and millions of dollars. Foolish girl! :)

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I do love the 1960s heist films (with the exception of The Pink Panther and with the exception of David Niven, but I find Peter Sellers horribly annoying).  Heist films (whether they're more comedic or more action packed) are always so much fun and I'm always rooting for the heist to come off successfully.  I loved How to Steal a Million with Audrey Hepburn and Peter O'Toole.  Gambit with Michael Caine and Shirley MacLaine was also a lot of fun.  These films always have such great music and for whatever reason, great fashions. 

 

I have at all times felt that: The Pink Panther (1963) would have been much better movie if Peter Sellers had not been in it. David Niven has shown many times how wonderful he is as suave and discriminating thief.

 

How to Steal a Million (1966) is one of my favorite-of-all-time movies! It is wonderful love story evolving within ingenious caper. I would dearly love to share a closet with Peter O'Toole!

 

Gambit (1966) was quite odd for me because I could not understand how: Shirley MacLaine could remain so aloof and unspeaking for so very long! And then we see that it is fantasy and we are treated to her wonderful full-ditz-mode! Superb!

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When I first saw this film, I had already seen (and been a fan of) the 1999 remake with Pierce Brosnan and Rene Russo.  Upon initial viewing, I found the original version tedious and boring, in comparison with the flashier newer movie.  Since then I had regarded the remake as an improvement.

 

Tonight, I gave this film another shot.  I've recently become more interested in Faye Dunaway's work.  She had really impressed me in Network and I love her campiness and ridiculousness in Mommie Dearest.  Upon a second viewing, I think I'm going to have to retract my initial opinion of this film versus the remake. 

 

I agree with slayton's opinion regarding the overall aesthetic of this film. This is a cool film.  I loved how sleek, sexy, just plain stylish this film is.  While the remake's sexiness is more explicit, I like the more subtle (but somehow still overt) sexiness displayed by Steve McQueen and Dunaway.  The chess scene is definitely one of the sexiest scenes I've seen in film.  The remake seems to have traded the stylish aesthetics of this film for more explicit sexiness and flashier scenery overall.  I do think that the remake improved upon the overall execution of the heist. 

 

I don't think either version is better than the other, they're just different.  However, I think I can now say that I no longer find the original film dull.  This film is just one among many that require second (or third or more) looks to catch everything and get caught up in the cool factor. 

 

 

 

Both fun, well done, entertaining movies - with a slight overall preference edge going to the earlier '68 version.

 

:)

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I like the original 1968 version of 'THE THOMAS CROWN AFFAIR' better.  The main reason is the ending:  I'd not have believed it if Tommy Crown and Vicky had ended up together at the end.  Both were very determined people and Vicky couldn't let her personal feelings get in the way of getting her job done and Thomas Crown knew that, too.       

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One of my first jobs in TV was working at WPIX in New York in the mid 1960's. When I wasn't covering the Yankee home games I was at the studios in the Daily News building. They had a lot of kid programming, Chuck McCann, Office Joe Bolton [ the 3 Stooges], Capt. Jack McCarthy [ Popeye cartoons] and  The Carol Corbett show, a lunch time show with The Mighty Hercules cartoons.. Me and another cameraman was always kidding around with her, she was like a kid sister and a real sweetheart. One day she came in to the studio and told us that she had got a part in a Steve McQueen film and she was going to be away for a few weeks. She was gone a little longer and when she came back it turned out the film was "The Thomas Crown Affair" and she had been cast as his secretary. She told us that McQueen and the director had like her and had expanded her part a little more. She kept going on how nice McQueen was to work with and what a thrill it was.

I was working in San Francisco a few years later and was on the set of "Bullitt" one night when they were shooting the hospital scenes and I got to meet McQueen. I though of Carol later and wished I had got in touch with her...

 

I always like the McQueen/Dunaway version. I enjoyed the remake, but the original was a better film..

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Except for Michel Legrand's "Windmills of Your Mind", I like this movie. It's stylish for it's time. I am always reminded of the 1972 Banacek tv series.

This song won the Oscar for Best Song. Legrand's (and the Bergmans') far superior "What Are You Doing the Rest of Your Life", from THE HAPPY ENDING, did not.

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Except for Michel Legrand's "Windmills of Your Mind", I like this movie. It's stylish for it's time. I am always reminded of the 1972 Banacek tv series.

 

 

I have to admit, I like the song, more for it's music, tho, than the lyrics.  Perhaps because I admire Legrand immensely.  He's one of the most important figures in post-studio movie music, and is responsible for many great movie themes and songs.  I sure I don't have to enumerate them.  HIs style can range from the light, breezy, and jazzy to the lush and orchestral--all of which we get in Thomas Crown.

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I have to admit, I like the song, more for it's music, tho, than the lyrics.  Perhaps because I admire Legrand immensely.  He's one of the most important figures in post-studio movie music, and is responsible for many great movie themes and songs.  I sure I don't have to enumerate them.  HIs style can range from the light, breezy, and jazzy to the lush and orchestral--all of which we get in Thomas Crown.

 

And I must admit, the singing in "Windmills of Your Mind" is what I really object to - the music is fine, IMO.

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David Niven has shown many times how wonderful he is as suave and discriminating thief.

 

He plays it to perfection as a suave and discriminating con man-gigolo in the 1964 comedy 'Bedtime Story', as well. A wonderful film that TCM never runs. I know you don't enjoy Brando much, but I think you'd like this movie. Niven and Marlon make great foils.

 

Brando said that 'Bedtime Story' was the most fun he ever had making a movie and it was because of David Niven - said he was absolutely delightful to be around.

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He plays it to perfection as a suave and discriminating con man-gigolo in the 1964 comedy 'Bedtime Story', as well. A wonderful film that TCM never runs. I know you don't enjoy Brando much, but I think you'd like this movie. Niven and Marlon make great foils.

 

Brando said that 'Bedtime Story' was the most fun he ever had making a movie and it was because of David Niven - said he was absolutely delightful to be around.

........not to be confused with the better known 1941 comedy of the same title starring Fredric March and Loretta Young. Was the '64 film a remake?

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I remember seeing the Thomas Crown Affair on a Saturday date (you know, dress, hose, French heel pumps and a wicked bee-hive) and came away wowed: the clothes, the settings, the music, Steve McQueen...yowzer!!!

 

It was terribly sophisticated for its time and Faye Dunaway was over the top with her style. And who couldn't just dream of a day and night on the beach with Steve McQueen.

 

I like Pierce Brosnan and I like art so I thought the art theft in the revision was cool and the idea of an art heist using inspiration from art (a thousand bowler hats from the Rene Magritte movie) was a great imaginative idea. I think if you didn't know Rene Magritte you would not have understood it quite so much. I understood bank heists in the 60's and then I understood art in the 90's.

 

I like both movies for different reasons, so I don't believe I'll complain about either. Each movie is relevant to its time (Steve driving a dune buggy, Pierce flying gliders). Most likely gliders were climate friendly, dune buggies not too much.

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