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Does unrestricted, uncensored film-art corrupt the moral fabric of society?


JeanneCrain
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It's a provocative question. But it may be better if you provided some examples to back up your views, otherwise it seems like you are making a fairly general (and damning) blanket statement.

 

Personally, I think art and morality are two different things. People who use art to preach morals may be just as manipulative as those who use art to deliberately push an alternative agenda. Neither side is better than the other (though they often both feel they are championing 'the truth'). 

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When one considers the cultural popularity of movies predicated upon questionably moral themes…isn’t unrestricted, uncensored film-art an overall detriment to society, particularly its moral wellbeing?

 

:unsure: 

 

NOPE! Not at least as long as "Mommy and Daddy" are doin' THEIR job as a parent correctly anyway!

 

(...and as it's EVER been!!!)

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Questionably moral themes? You mean like movies that continually glorify war - the kind America has been churning out since 1941?

Who's deciding what's "questionable" - the Corporate State? Fundamentalist Right-Wingers? Humanitarian Secularists? The Girl Scouts? The Ku Klux K lan? The NAACP? The Womens Liberation Front? The Catholic Church? The PTA?

Or can I decide?

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When one considers the cultural popularity of movies predicated upon questionably moral themes…isn’t unrestricted, uncensored film-art an overall detriment to society, particularly its moral wellbeing?

 

:unsure: 

That's just what the Hays people thought!

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When one considers the cultural popularity of movies predicated upon questionably moral themes…isn’t unrestricted, uncensored film-art an overall detriment to society, particularly its moral wellbeing?

 

:unsure: 

 

As others have suggested, be more specific.  What movies?  And what aspects of moral wellbeing?  You've raised a serious question, but without any elaboration it's hard to tell exactly what you're trying to get at.

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When one considers the cultural popularity of movies predicated upon questionably moral themes…isn’t unrestricted, uncensored film-art an overall detriment to society, particularly its moral wellbeing?

 

 

I feel that restricting art in any form is more detrimental to society than any art in and of its own self could possibly be.

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When one considers the cultural popularity of movies predicated upon questionably moral themes…isn’t unrestricted, uncensored film-art an overall detriment to society, particularly its moral wellbeing?

 

:unsure: 

 

I also say NO WAY.   One reason is based on the use of 'overall detriment to society';    OK,  some movies might lead to the detriment of society (but in a very limited way to a very limited number of people),  but this is the minority of films.    Even in Post Production code films most characters with questionable moral values don't end up as happy campers.      While not as ****-for-tat as the Production code movies most of the time characters get what is coming to them.  

 

Of course what are questionable moral values is very subjective.

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Questionably moral themes? You mean like movies that continually glorify war - the kind America has been churning out since 1941?

 

 

Now HOLD ON a minute here, you dern Canuck, YOU!!! Now HERE'S what I think is the REAL source of America's "declining moral fabric" and who we can REALLY blame for all this!....

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bOR38552MJA

 

(...ya's just better pray we 'Mericans have forgotten history, somethin' we're "so good" at ya know, and don't take to mind to once again kickin' your behinds like we did back in 1812...I mean, we DID win that one, right?!) ;)

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As others have suggested, be more specific.  What movies?  And what aspects of moral wellbeing?  You've raised a serious question, but without any elaboration it's hard to tell exactly what you're trying to get at.

 

Specifics/examples have deliberately been omit since one can't speak to another's moral and/or value beliefs - and in there lies my point - which leads to a precluding question as to who has earned and/or deserves the right to be another's moral/value compass - yet, the masses whether by choice or subconsciously yearn direction of such which has throughout history allowed the opportunists, whether be propagandists, governments, advertisers, cults, movie-makers, etc. appoint themselves to such culturally changing/guiding "mind molding" roles of the masses.

 

All of which may lead to the purpose of justice and how laws, governments, politics, etc. on many levels, undermines the foundation of individual liberty…more importantly, the constitutional right of individuals to pursue their happiness.

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Specifics/examples have deliberately been omit since one can't speak to another's moral and/or value beliefs - and in there lies my point - which leads to a precluding question as to who has earned and/or deserves the right to be another's moral/value compass - yet, the masses whether by choice or subconsciously yearn direction of such which has throughout history allowed the opportunists, whether be propagandists, governments, advertisers, cults, movie-makers, etc. appoint themselves to such culturally changing/guiding "mind molding" roles of the masses.

Sounds a little too convoluted, Jeanne. I think you need to be clearer. Saying Hollywood is corrupt or creating product that endangers the soul is simply just an opinion. You need to provide authentic evidence to support your claims. If that is where you are headed with the discussion...otherwise, it is a lightning rod topic that may lead to a bunch of argument for the sake of argument.

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Reading through this thread has made me want to go watch a really sleazy, grindhouse movie from the 1970s so I can get my mind "right" again. 

 

    (So who wants to watch WINNEBANGO with me?  > It takes place in a motorhome, too!)  ;)

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Sounds a little too convoluted, Jeanne. I think you need to be clearer. Saying Hollywood is corrupt or creating product that endangers the soul is simply just an opinion. You need to provide authentic evidence to support your claims. If that is where you are headed with the discussion...otherwise, it is a lightning rod topic that may lead to a bunch of argument for the sake of argument.

 

Without explanation, Grandmother forbid us to see the movie "The Exorcist"

 

:huh:

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Without explanation, Grandmother forbid us to see the movie "The Exorcist"

 

:huh:

Well, she probably wanted to make sure her grandkids didn't have nightmares...right? 

 

I don't think restricting or censoring films is something that can be enforced. It is best left up to the individual to decide. Your grandmother made a decision. Other people made other decisions. Some have watched THE EXORCIST or similar pictures and it hasn't necessarily harmed them.

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Well, she probably wanted to make sure her grandkids didn't have nightmares...right? 

 

I don't think restricting or censoring films is something that can be enforced. It is best left up to the individual to decide. Your grandmother made a decision. Other people made other decisions. Some have watched THE EXORCIST or similar pictures and it hasn't necessarily harmed them.

 

 

Regardless of her reasons, her decision trampled upon another's liberty - which brings us back to the topic of unrestricted, uncensored movies corrupting the moral social fabric as opposed to liberty be exorcised by censorship under the guise of social morality?

 

:unsure:

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First off, I don't think art (whether it is paintings, films, interpretive dance, whatever) should be censored.  Typically artists have a specific message in mind, whether they are trying to make a statement about the government, society, morality, etc.  It is up to the audience how they interpret the message.  I don't think it's fair to censor the artist because of how it might affect a small pocket of society. 

 

During the Production Code era, we had movie studios trying to enforce their version of morality upon the masses, which led to the artists' work being modified or even out right banned because of the message it might give to the audiences.  Production Code members were afraid of glorifying bad behavior.  The filmmakers were unable to tell the story they wanted to tell, because in order to get the film out into the theaters, they had to bend to the Production Code's wishes and make changes to the overall story they were trying to tell.  Sometimes they were able to skirt the questionable material by adding more innuendo.  I think it's a shame that the filmmakers' artistry was oppressed in this regard.  By forcing the filmmakers to always make sure a film ends happily, or with the bad guy ending up in jail, or what have you, in a way the Production Code Committee hurt audiences because they provided an unrealistic view of the world.  Sometimes, the bad guy does get away with murder. 

 

Re: the Grandma example, isn't there a difference between a parent figure protecting children from a movie they deem questionable, and a group of people trying to decide what story plots, characters, etc are appropriate for masses of adults who may purchase tickets to their films?

 

My mom didn't want my sister and I watching Psycho because she thought it would be too scary for us.  One night when she was out of town, my dad rented Psycho from the video store and we all watched it.  We weren't scared at all and found the movie exciting. 

 

What one deems questionable or potentially corrupting may not be what someone else does and for that reason alone, I think censorship should be done on the individual level and not at a government level (for example). 

 

If someone is so easily corrupted by film, then they have a lot bigger problems than just watching questionable film content.

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