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If you were a guest on TCM name the ONE movie you'd show your audience...


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There was a very good copy I saw on the internet, shown by some video outlet in a foreign country. A note said that copy was recorded off the BBC some years back, so it was not a pirated Disney DVD. Anyway, the quality was great and the color was great.

I posted on the SONG OF THE SOUTH thread that my county library system here in Wisconsin has a copy of the film. I requested it, and about three weeks later I was able to pick it up at the local branch. The copyright on the back of the DVD case indicated it was the real deal-- it definitely was Disney manufactured home video, but an arm of Disney located in Australia. So that told me they are still selling the film in other parts of the world. Only in North America is it a no-no.

 

But here we have people in North America buying it online and having it shipped in from other countries. The ironic thing is that my county library is tax-dollar supported. And if you think about it, some of those tax dollars come from black Americans. 

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By the way, black actor James Baskett was the first black actor to receive an Academy Award.

 

Here's what happened: He was NOT awarded a "competative" award in 1947, but they gave him an "honorary" award in 1948.

 

Walt Disney is supposed to have lobbied hard for giving him the award.

 

It seems to me that they didn't want to put Baskett up against the white male actors in 1947, so he got cheated out of his real "competative" Academy Award, but was given the "honorary" one a year later. He was indeed a great actor in this film and maybe the best male actor of the 1946 film season. But he wasn't recognized as such because the Academy was too cowardly to even nominate him up against all the white actors of the '46-'47 season.

 

1948BASKETTOSCAR2.jpg

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By the way, black actor James Baskett was the first black actor to receive an Academy Award.

 

Here's what happened: He was NOT awarded a "competative" award in 1947, but they gave him an "honorary" award in 1948.

 

Walt Disney is supposed to have lobbied hard for giving him the award.

 

It seems to me that they didn't want to put Baskett up against the white male actors in 1947, so he got cheated out of his real "competative" Academy Award, but was given the "honorary" one a year later. He was indeed a great actor in this film and maybe the best male actor of the 1946 film season. But he wasn't recognized as such because the Academy was too cowardly to even nominate him up against all the white actors of the '46-'47 season.

I know we're getting away from the OP's topic-- but quick question: do you think if Baskett turned in this performance today, he would be nominated? Or would modern-day Hollywood try to throw him and the film under the proverbial bus?

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I know we're getting away from the OP's topic-- but quick question: do you think if Baskett turned in this performance today, he would be nominated? Or would modern-day Hollywood try to throw him and the film under the proverbial bus?

 

I don't know.

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I know we're getting away from the OP's topic-- but quick question: do you think if Baskett turned in this performance today, he would be nominated? Or would modern-day Hollywood try to throw him and the film under the proverbial bus?

I think James Baskett's performance is wonderful but of its time.  I don't know if you could it up against modern performances.  And I'm not referring to its controversy.  Its just pleasantly antiquated.  

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I think James Baskett's performance is wonderful but of its time.  I don't know if you could it up against modern performances.  And I'm not referring to its controversy.  Its just pleasantly antiquated.  

 

LOL, it's coming back.....

 

 

 

 

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For me, I would like to see Black Narcissus. I know it's been shown in the past but I think it's a great movie. I love the way the "palace" looks. I would also like to see Song of the South. I have never seen or heard of it. I could make a much longer list.

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This is easy.  I would definitely choose the 1941 comedy THE STRAWBERRY BLONDE with James Cagney, Olivia De Havilland, Rita Hayworth and Alan Hale.

 

I love this film.  It was written by the Epstein brothers who, only about 1 year later wrote CASABLANCA (and, couple years later MR. SKEFFINGTON with Bette Davis.... another gem).  

 

This film is charming, funny, and serious.  It  makes me laugh, makes my cry and has some wonderful dialogue. It's one of those films were everyone is perfectly cast and they each give a wonderful performance.  

 

You can also see GEORGE REEVES (TVs superman) in a small role here.  Jack Carson plays the same role as usual, but he fits perfectly as well.

 

Photograph below is an original 3-sheet for the film which is framed and on display in my living room.  I like this film alot!

 

 

straw.jpg

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This is easy.  I would definitely choose the 1941 comedy THE STRAWBERRY BLONDE with James Cagney, Olivia De Havilland, Rita Hayworth and Alan Hale.

 

I love this film.  It was written by the Epstein brothers who, only about 1 year later wrote CASABLANCA (and, couple years later MR. SKEFFINGTON with Bette Davis.... another gem).  

 

This film is charming, funny, and serious.  

 

 

The original film (because it is a remake) was much darker in tone. It was done at Paramount and starred Gary Cooper and Fay Wray; TCM airs it sometimes. And there was another remake, as a Technicolor musical in the late 40s with Dennis Morgan and Janis Paige, which reverted back to the original title-- ONE SUNDAY AFTERNOON.

 

The 1933 version is credited to William McNutt and Grover Jones; and the 1948 version is written by Robert Richards. The play, which ran on Broadway for over 300 performances, was written by James Hagan. So I'm not sure how much the CASABLANCA brothers added to the general story.

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This is easy.  I would definitely choose the 1941 comedy THE STRAWBERRY BLONDE with James Cagney, Olivia De Havilland, Rita Hayworth and Alan Hale.

 

I love this film.  It was written by the Epstein brothers who, only about 1 year later wrote CASABLANCA (and, couple years later MR. SKEFFINGTON with Bette Davis.... another gem).  

 

This film is charming, funny, and serious.  It  makes me laugh, makes my cry and has some wonderful dialogue. It's one of those films were everyone is perfectly cast and they each give a wonderful performance.  

 

You can also see GEORGE REEVES (TVs superman) in a small role here.  Jack Carson plays the same role as usual, but he fits perfectly as well.

 

Photograph below is an original 3-sheet for the film which is framed and on display in my living room.  I like this film alot!

 

 

 

 

I really love this movie.  First rate with a great mix of comedy,  romance and drama.    I have publicity photos of Olivia wearing the dotted dress she wears from the scene where they all go to the park and Cagney is stuck with Olivia instead of Rita.   Olivia shows she was really great at this type of sophisticated comedy.      

 

This is the film that made me really fall for Olivia 25 years ago.   After I saw it I went to Edmund's Hollywood Store (the best place in the world to get old Hollywood merchandise),  and purchases those photos and books on Olivia.     It was that day I became an old Hollywood nut case (well according to my stoner friends who didn't get it!).

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I'd go a different route and show a more RECENT(by some's terms) film, 1962's PRESSURE POINT with Sidney Poitier and Bobby Darin.  I saw this back when it came out when I went to the show with my parents, and it's stark black and white imagery stuck with me all these years.  Add to the fact I haven't seen it in ages( still looking for a tape or DVD) is all the more inspiration.

 

IF any of you have seen it, you'll know what I mean when I say, ...I've never looked at a game of "tic-tac-toe", or down a drain the same way SINCE!  ;)

 

 

Sepiatone

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No.

 

My point is that Jane Pauley wasted a lot of time talking about Nazis when Leni was on the show to talk about her documentary.

 

I wanted to hear about the documentary and how she made it. Plus, I can't stand news reporters demanding that news interview subjects agree with them (the reporters) politically, and that is ALL Pauley was interested in... in getting Leni down on her knees licking Pauley's feet, saying she agreed 100% with Pauley. But Leni wasn't on the show to talk about Pauley's bliefs or the Nazis. She was on the show to talk about the documentary.

 

Having been in the news business for 35 years I'm well aware of how news anchors and reporters trick people into being interviewed. Pauley NEVER HAD ANY INTENTION of talking about the documentary. She only wanted to embarrass Leni and get her to condenm the Nazis and beg forgiveness and to say that her documentary was an awful mistake and a sin. blah, blah, blah. I'm glad NBC finally fired Pauley.

You're a well known reporter and you get an interview with the most well known propagandist for the Nazi regime and you don't expect that reporter to ask probing questions about that propaganda? That sounds absurd, and you think she's just trying to get her to agree with her politics? That's even more absurd.

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