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DARBY O'GILL AND THE LITTLE PEOPLE


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  My only complaint and it is a big one. Couldn't they have come up with a print in its original aspect ratio ?   TCM should have played that short they produced many years ago. You know the one ...."would you like to see the Last Supper with 8 disciples or 12 disciples ?"

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Yes, what exactly have they done with the picture? It seems like a cropped image they stretched out to fit in widescreen. Is that what they've done? 

 

The original aspect ratio is 1.75 : 1

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  My only complaint and it is a big one. Couldn't they have come up with a print in its original aspect ratio ?   TCM should have played that short they produced many years ago. You know the one ...."would you like to see the Last Supper with 8 disciples or 12 disciples ?"

Are you watching it in standard definition? I've got it on on from DirecTV in HD and it fills the screen and isn't stretched.

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Are you watching it in standard definition? I've got it on on from DirecTV in HD and it fills the screen and isn't stretched.

Yes, it is stretched, mark. I am watching on HD also. But you can tell it is cropped if you look at the sides, you will see figures and faces half chopped off, and surely the director and Walt himself did not intend it to be that way.

 

I call this 'fake widescreen.' 

 

This will not happen with THE THREE CABALLEROS because it was made before the advent of widescreen. Even if it is stretched out on HD, it will not be cropped because the original aspect ratio is 1.37 : 1

 

But I am sure that THE FIGHTING PRINCE OF DONEGAL will be cropped, too and will be stretched out to fit the screen.

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  My only complaint and it is a big one. Couldn't they have come up with a print in its original aspect ratio ?   TCM should have played that short they produced many years ago. You know the one ...."would you like to see the Last Supper with 8 disciples or 12 disciples ?"

 

I'm getting the heebie-jeebies just thinking about it.

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You could really tell during the opening credits.  The words on the left side of the screen were cut off...

Of course, we've all been taught that pan and scan is unacceptable from TCM explaining what it is constantly...

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  I would like to remind people that there was no problem with the original theatrical aspect ratio when they showed THIRD MAN ON THE MOUNTAIN a few months ago. Why this time ?  Too bad an expert like Leonard Maltin won't speak on this issue.

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 Let me add this:  This was an excellent film totally screwed up by the presentation shown on TCM tonight.  Shame on them for touting all these years about seeing films in their original theatrical aspect ratio.

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TCM also showed the dubbed version which was made for the American home video market. The original movie had a few scenes that were in Gaelic. Like when the two leprechauns announce the arrival of Darby O'Gill to King Brian. Or when King Brian asks for the Stradivarius. Both scenes were spoken in Gaelic in the movie originally, but were dubbed in English in the version shown on TCM.

 

I've seen this movie many times and was disappointed to see that TCM showed the dubbed version.

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A suggestion I have involves the schedule/order of the films. I think it would have been much more effective to lead off with the TV show episode featuring Walt and Pat O'Brien, discussing Walt's desire to make a film about leprechauns. Then, to go into the presentation of DARBY O'GILL. Even Maltin's wraparound supports this, because he said years ago he would watch The Wonderful World of Disney, and it would whet his appetite for the films that were being promoted in the weekly TV series.

 

It is a bit anticlimactic to broadcast this old episode after DARBY. Plus it is in black-and-white and a somewhat cheaply produced episode of TV. You would logically want to go from something like this to the bigger, finished product in Technicolor and widescreen showing how Walt's vision came to life in theatres. Not the other way around.

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On our standard tv the image was cropped. On the hd tv, the image was fine, plenty of scenery on either side of the opening credits, no stretching. We usually keep the resolution at 480i on the standard (smaller) tv when watching TCM in order to avoid the postage stamp image (borders on all sides). Our box from TWC allows changes in resolution output, even on standard tv's.

 

I, too, was disappointed that this was the dubbed copy. I was hoping it was the original audio track, but no soap. I find it so distracting. Greatly mars the enjoyment of this movie.

 

BTW, Disney Movies On Demand is airing "I Captured the King of the Leprechauns" until April 6th.

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A suggestion I have involves the schedule/order of the films. I think it would have been much more effective to lead off with the TV show episode featuring Walt and Pat O'Brien, discussing Walt's desire to make a film about leprechauns. Then, to go into the presentation of DARBY O'GILL. Even Maltin's wraparound supports this, because he said years ago he would watch The Wonderful World of Disney, and it would whet his appetite for the films that were being promoted in the weekly TV series.

 

It is a bit anticlimactic to broadcast this old episode after DARBY. Plus it is in black-and-white and a somewhat cheaply produced episode of TV. You would logically want to go from something like this to the bigger, finished product in Technicolor and widescreen showing how Walt's vision came to life in theatres. Not the other way around.

I must say I'm glad I came in forty minutes into it and thoroughly enjoyed the rest of the movie. arthur sharpe is so charmingly folksy. him and dennis o'dea as king brian make the film so magical.

I do agree it woulda been better to show the darby o'gill short before the movie. pat o'brien was..well, pat o'brien but disney's  "acting" was stiff. I turned it off when that putz disney passed on the pot o' gold that the leprechaun cobbler offered him. :)

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Might have been an idea to show most of this Disney stuff at 6 a.m. so the kids would tune in.

When I was a little squirt I was up at that time to watch the test pattern before the cartoons started.

Maybe it is too high profile with Leonard Maltin and all?

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On our standard tv the image was cropped. On the hd tv, the image was fine, plenty of scenery on either side of the opening credits, no stretching. We usually keep the resolution at 480i on the standard (smaller) tv when watching TCM in order to avoid the postage stamp image (borders on all sides). Our box from TWC allows changes in resolution output, even on standard tv's.

 

Usually the credits are not chopped off...it is immediately after the credits, when the story begins that the pan-and-scan takes affect.

 

It was definitely a cropped image on my HD channel of TCM. I was glad to be able to see the film all the way through, but since it was TCM's lead movie last night with Maltin, it would have been better if they had given viewers the best print and audio version.

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This will not happen with THE THREE CABALLEROS because it was made before the advent of widescreen. Even if it is stretched out on HD, it will not be cropped because the original aspect ratio is 1.37 : 1

 

But I am sure that THE FIGHTING PRINCE OF DONEGAL will be cropped, too and will be stretched out to fit the screen.

Quoting myself (rarely do that)-- to add an update here:

 

As I predicted, the CABALLEROS movie was shown in the correct ratio. But when I reviewed my recording this morning of DONEGAL, apparently it was filmed in 1.37 : 1...so there was no need to crop or pan-and-scan it. 

 

The only title last night on TCM that was cropped was DARBY O'GILL.

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I liked the film as it was shown. I didn't notice the change in format.

 

Disney might have shot this in wide screen for the theater, but with "center weighted" action, meainging that all the main characters were framed in 4:3 in the center of the screen, so that he could show the film on old 4:3 TV later. with the people on the right and left side of the wide screen being cut off with no ill effect for the TV audience.

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I liked the film as it was shown. I didn't notice the change in format.

 

Disney might have shot this in wide screen for the theater, but with "center weighted" action, meainging that all the main characters were framed in 4:3 in the center of the screen, so that he could show the film on old 4:3 TV later. with the people on the right and left side of the wide screen being cut off with no ill effect for the TV audience.

Fred,

 

i will agree. I think you are right about the center-weighted action. Disney did make films with an eye on re-running them as part of his weekly TV series, so yes this makes sense. You cannot notice the cropping too much, unless you are looking for it. 

 

Still, I agree with those who wish TCM had shown the print that was meant for widescreen in the theatre.

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Fred,

 

i will agree. I think you are right about the center-weighted action. Disney did make films with an eye on re-running them as part of his weekly TV series, so yes this makes sense. You cannot notice the cropping too much, unless you are looking for it. 

 

Still, I agree with those who wish TCM had shown the print that was meant for widescreen in the theatre.

probably woulda cost more for tcm to get a hold of a widescreen print of darby o'gill so that's a non-starter for tcm right there.

my advice is to not expect too much from a group that has forgotten hot spell (1958) even exists. :D

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TCM also showed the dubbed version which was made for the American home video market. The original movie had a few scenes that were in Gaelic. Like when the two leprechauns announce the arrival of Darby O'Gill to King Brian. Or when King Brian asks for the Stradivarius. Both scenes were spoken in Gaelic in the movie originally, but were dubbed in English in the version shown on TCM.

 

I've seen this movie many times and was disappointed to see that TCM showed the dubbed version.

 

Yes, forget about the aspect ratio, I think it's incredible that TCM aired the partially DUBBED re-issue version! It's terrible to think that anyone who was seeing the film for the first time last night wouldn't have gotten the full expericance of a Disney masterpiece.

 

I hope TCM will show the proper, original version, if they ever air the film again.

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Fred,

 

i will agree. I think you are right about the center-weighted action. Disney did make films with an eye on re-running them as part of his weekly TV series, so yes this makes sense. You cannot notice the cropping too much, unless you are looking for it. 

 

Still, I agree with those who wish TCM had shown the print that was meant for widescreen in the theatre.

Fred's thought is really interesting. Disney had both film and TV interests, so of course he would have the eventual TV showing in mind as he made his movies. Other studios at the time were still committed to competing with television. I remember "Cleopatra" being advertised (on television!) as "the one movie you'll never see on TV", and of course it was on TV within about five years or so. Disney was no dummy, was he?

Anyway, I loved "Darby O'Gill", especially after hearing Leonard Maltin say it was filmed entirely in California and that much of what seemed to be processed shots of the large and small figures together was really done by forced perspective. An amazing job with the effects and a totally charming story.

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Fred's thought is really interesting. Disney had both film and TV interests, so of course he would have the eventual TV showing in mind as he made his movies. Other studios at the time were still committed to competing with television. I remember "Cleopatra" being advertised (on television!) as "the one movie you'll never see on TV", and of course it was on TV within about five years or so. Disney was no dummy, was he?

Anyway, I loved "Darby O'Gill", especially after hearing Leonard Maltin say it was filmed entirely in California and that much of what seemed to be processed shots of the large and small figures together was really done by forced perspective. An amazing job with the effects and a totally charming story.

Even something like the Welsh village in HOW GREEN WAS MY VALLEY was filmed in southern California by 20th Century Fox. In those days, studios didn't take a crew to Europe to film if they didn't have to.

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