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When I saw The Prince of Donegal,back in 1966 ,at the Parmaount Theater,it was in wide screen!.I just saw it and it;s in small screen.I checked the i.m.d.b. and it was shownat 1.88:5.The version I saw fit the whole panavision screen,I remember .Why did not Disney present this film on that ratio? :o

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When I saw The Prince of Donegal,back in 1966 ,at the Parmaount Theater,it was in wide screen!.I just saw it and it;s in small screen.I checked the i.m.d.b. and it was shownat 1.88:5.The version I saw fit the whole panavision screen,I remember .Why did not Disney present this film on that ratio? :o

 

In the 1960s Disney filmed his movies in wide screen, with a 4:3 matte over the viewfinder, which allowed the cameraman to keep all the main action in the center of the screen, for later showing on old-fashioned 4:3 TV screens.

 

A 4:3 matte is generally a transparent film that is cut to fit a wide-screen viewfinder, but in the center area is a white outline in the 4:3 format. That way, a cameraman can compose the scene for both wide screen and 4:3 TV at the same time, being sure he has all the main action and actors inside the 4:3 area in the center of the 4:3 matte. This technique does NOT involve "pan and scan", since the original film was shot for BOTH formats at the same time.

 

"Pan and scan" does involve panning and scanning of the film when the original film was shot in the wide-screen format only, with NO TV matte inside the viewfinder. These films cause conversion problems when one actor is on the far left of the wide screen, and another is on the far right, with NO actor in the dead center of the screen.

 

Study DARBY O'GILL AND THE LITTLE PEOPLE to see how Disney used the double format "center weighted" technique. Disney used the double-format technique, with a wide screen viewfinder with a 4:3 matte inside the wide screen viewfinder, so the cameraman could see BOTH formats at the same time while filming the movie.

 

:)

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