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Moving in the Movies


speedracer5
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This topic was inspired by two things: 1) My husband and I just bought a 1940 bungalow and are starting to move in and trying to work up enough ambition to paint and do other things to customize the home to our tastes; and 2) MissWonderly and I were having a conversation about this topic and she (I think semi-jokingly, but I'm going with it) suggested this as a topic to discuss on the message board. 

 

Moving in/out of a home is an experience that most everyone undergoes a few times in their life.  Some more than others; but I very much doubt that someone is born and dies in the same home without ever living elsewhere, if this is the case, it is a very small segment of the population.  There are many movies that feature this very same topic.  Some are moving out of an apartment and moving to the suburbs; Others are moving from the country to the city; Some are escaping destitution by moving to a more affluent city; the list goes on.  Not all moving experiences are positive. 

 

One of my absolute favorite movies is The Long Long Trailer.  This film features Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz as newlyweds who move out of an apartment in So.Cal and into a large trailer.  Arnaz' job apparently involves a lot of traveling.  Ball, not wanting to be left home, or having to live out of suitcases, suggests purchasing the trailer so they have all the comforts of home and are able to go on a honeymoon at the same time.  They are enroute to Colorado where Arnaz' next job is lined up.  Sounds good right? Well, in typical Lucy fashion (because lets face it, this entire movie could be just one big long I Love Lucy episode), things don't go how they should.  Moving struggles involve fitting an entire apartment's worth of belongings into a small space and the shower being short and small.  Also, the lack of a fixed foundation means that Lucy and Desi often need to find a new place to park (sometimes with or without electricty) or having to deal with nosy neighbors.  Having to literally move your home puts a new meaning into the word "moving." 

 

A couple nights ago, I watched The Egg and I.  This film featured Fred MacMurray and Claudette Colbert, newlyweds, who move into a dilapidated farmhouse on a chicken farm.  MacMurray, tired of the 9-5 grind, surprises Colbert on their wedding night by stating that he quit his job and purchased a farm and that they're going to be farmers! The next day, they arrive at the farm.  The home is a wreck as are the structures that the animals live in.  Cue a montage of MacMurray and Colbert trying to fix up the home and the animal structures and voila! a few minutes later, the place is as good as new.  The rest of the film features the city folks trying to fit in with the country neighbors like Ma and Pa Kettle and dealing with issues related to living in the middle of nowhere.  While my house wasn't dilapidated by any means and I didn't move to the middle of nowhere, I am relating to the issue of needing to fix and update things in an older home.

 

What other examples of moving are there in film?

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MR. BLANDINGS BUILDS HIS DREAM HOUSE certainly fits the topic.

I love this movie.  Cary Grant's dream of living away from the city quickly goes awry as he and wife Myrna Loy don't think it through all the way in regard to all that goes into building a home.  Melvyn Douglas was excellent as well.

 

My favorite part of the movie is when Myrna Loy is trying to explain to the painters all the different shades that she wants in the house.  Her instructions and samples are so ridiculous and convoluted, that it'd be amazing if her house was painted using any of the colors she specified. 

 

I only wish this movie was in color.  I think that the Technicolor would have greatly enhanced the "dream house" aspect.  Not that the lack of color makes the film less enjoyable, I think it would have been even better with Technicolor added into its budget. 

 

"If it a'int 'Wham' it a'int ham!"

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You could scrape near the bottom of the 'Moving' barrel by watching the 1988 movie 'MOVING' with Richard Pryor.  (At least it's better than 'ANOTHER YOU' (1991)).    

 

     There's also the 1970 Elliott Gould movie 'MOVE'.  Elliott moves from one NYC apartment to another with daydreams and surrealism along the way.  I've seen it several times and like it, but there really is no point to the movie at all.  I suppose it would be considered an acquired taste.  But, hey, it is about 'Moving'.   :)

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You could scrape near the bottom of the 'Moving' barrel by watching the 1988 movie 'MOVING' with Richard Pryor.  (At least it's better than 'ANOTHER YOU' (1991)).    

 

I actually think there's a lot to like about this movie. Pryor & wife buy this beautiful home in Idaho, if I'm remembering correctly, they go home to get ready for the move. They get to the house with all their possessions and discover that the house wasn't the way it was when they bought it. Then there's the plot with their nutso neighbor played by the real life nut Randy Quaid. And they hire Dana Carney to drive their prized Porsche to the new place and he turns out to be quite different than the clean cute young man they hired. Maybe not Pryors best but not bad. There are laughs.

 

A Raisin in the Sun is all about trying to move to a better life but obstacles get in the way.

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One of my favorites- George Washington Slept Here. They move to the dilapidated house in the country because their lease is up and Rommy (sp) the dog kept ripping the carpet. Love Jack Benny, Ann Sheriden, Hattie McDaniel and Uncle Stanley- (I drew a blank on his name).

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Nice topic idea. Not sure if you want examples of films with moving in them. Or different ways moving might be depicted in various films. 

 

Obviously the way the couple moves (and moves around inside that trailer) in THE LONG LONG TRAILER is quite different than other characters moving in other motion pictures.

 

But if we're talking about films-- might I suggest the Doris Day vehicle PLEASE DON'T EAT THE DAISIES, where she and David Niven (with kids and dog in tow) move from a cramped city apartment out to the country.

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One of my favorites- George Washington Slept Here. They move to the dilapidated house in the country because their lease is up and Rommy (sp) the dog kept ripping the carpet. Love Jack Benny, Ann Sheriden, Hattie McDaniel and Uncle Stanley- (I drew a blank on his name).

Hey mockingbird--

 

Uncle Stanley is better known to the real world as Charles Coburn. :)

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"Mr. Blandings" spawned a couple of remakes.  One was "The Money Pit" with Tom Hanks and Shelley Long, and the other was "Are We Done Yet?" with Ice Cube and Nia Long.

 

 How could we forget the movie version of "The Beverly Hillbillies"?  Cloris Leachman as Granny was terrific, as was Lilly Tomlin as Miss Hathaway.

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Then there's BAREFOOT IN THE PARK--which doesn't involve moving from one place to another, but just moving in together.

 

RAISIN IN THE SUN---but we never do see what happens AFTER the move!

 

THE GODFATHER, which has them moving at the end of the movie

 

YOU CAN'T TAKE IT WITH YOU----one of the biggest moves of all!

 

YOURS, MINE, and OURS---moving into that big house and getting organized isn't easy even WITH all that help!

 

 

Sepiatone

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Nice topic idea. Not sure if you want examples of films with moving in them. Or different ways moving might be depicted in various films. 

 

Obviously the way the couple moves (and moves around inside that trailer) in THE LONG LONG TRAILER is quite different than other characters moving in other motion pictures.

 

But if we're talking about films-- might I suggest the Doris Day vehicle PLEASE DON'T EAT THE DAISIES, where she and David Niven (with kids and dog in tow) move from a cramped city apartment out to the country.

I think either interpretation of moving is fine. Some people move out of something positive, others have to move due to circumstance. There are a variety of reasons why and how people move. I thought it'd be interesting to discuss how moving is depicted on screen.

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I think either interpretation of moving is fine. Some people move out of something positive, others have to move due to circumstance. There are a variety of reasons why and how people move. I thought it'd be interesting to discuss how moving is depicted on screen.

Thanks for explaining!

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I actually think there's a lot to like about this movie. Pryor & wife buy this beautiful home in Idaho, if I'm remembering correctly, they go home to get ready for the move. They get to the house with all their possessions and discover that the house wasn't the way it was when they bought it. Then there's the plot with their nutso neighbor played by the real life nut Randy Quaid. And they hire Dana Carney to drive their prized Porsche to the new place and he turns out to be quite different than the clean cute young man they hired. Maybe not Pryors best but not bad. There are laughs.

 

A Raisin in the Sun is all about trying to move to a better life but obstacles get in the way.

 

Another Randy Quaid moving film is Parents (1989). Gotta be a cult film - I never see this one anywhere anymore.

 

The family moves to a new neighborhood and the child gradually becomes aware of the true nature of his family.

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Most Moving Moving Scene:

 

Soldier In The Rain, a film I don't otherwise care for. We see the furniture being moved out of a character's office. Handled in a very offhand, almost lackadaisical manner, yet oddly affecting.  I often include this in "Great Scenes in Mediocre Movies" threads.

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I take the thread title literally.  No need to "overthink" something simple.

 

Although,  in real life, moving is anything BUT simple!  Both physical or otherwise.

 

It would be up to the OP to come in and say if they intended for some of y'all to go overboard with the reading into something so simple as a scene of people moving into or out of a house or apartment.  Sometimes you guys remind me of my ex's kid brother, who sometimes looked for more than was actually intended.  After I add another "movie moving" example to my list, I'll explain further...

 

 

ADD TO MY LIST------

 

IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE---

 

Buy a house though Bailey Building and Loan, and George will let your GOAT ride  in HIS CAR!  AND, his wife will bring FOOD AND DRINK!

 

Now, the ex's kid brother comparison---

 

I once told him an old joke---

 

"Two drunks were standing out in front of a beer garden arguing.  'That thing up in the sky!  It's the MOON!' said one.  The other argued, 'No!  It's the SUN!'  they argued like this for a half hour.  Finally, one of them said, 'Listen. We'll ask NEXT guy comes along, and whatever HE says it is, we'll go by THAT!'  The other drunk agreed to it.  so, after about ten minutes, another guy comes along, and HE'S drunk, too.  But they stop him and ask him----'Hey, buddy!  See that LIGHT up in the sky?  Is it the SUN, or the MOON?'   the third drunk snorts and answers, 'How the hell would I know?  I don't LIVE in this neighborhood!'"

 

After telling the kid this joke, I heard nothing but silence from the backseat of the car.  Finally, after a few minutes, he timidly pipes up and asks, "Well, what WAS it?"

 

Kind of sounds like the kind of thing some of YOU guys'd come up with!  :P

 

 

Sepiatone

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One of my favorites- George Washington Slept Here. They move to the dilapidated house in the country because their lease is up and Rommy (sp) the dog kept ripping the carpet. Love Jack Benny, Ann Sheriden, Hattie McDaniel and Uncle Stanley- (I drew a blank on his name).

Also, MR. BLANDINGS.........

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