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2-Part HBO Frank Sinatra Documentary Starts Tomorrow at 8pm


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http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/music/la-et-ms-hbo-sinatra-all-or-nothing-20150402-story.html

 

This is a two-part documentary.  The first part airs tomorrow and the second part on Monday.  Both parts are set to air at 8pm.

 

This documentary sounds really interesting.  I'm looking forward to seeing it.  I really like Sinatra's music and his films.  I'm looking forward to learning more about his life and career.  Like most performers, his career had its ups and downs, but he always seemed to bounce back. 

 

In the early part of his career, "the bobby soxer years," he was the young crooner--appearing in many musicals.  His three films made with Gene Kelly were among his most successful.  By the 50s, his career was in the slums and he scored a supporting role in From Here to Eternity for which he won an Academy Award.  This film (and subsequent award) revitalized his career and gave him a new image.  While he did make some comedies and musicals, he also took on more serious roles like in The Man With the Golden Arm.  I find some of Sinatra's more serious roles among his most interesting, even though I definitely like his comedies and musicals.  I find that he's often cast as the suave bachelor playboy (The Tender Trap and Come Blow Your Horn), which for whatever, seems to suit his image well.

 

By the end of the 50s, he took on his role as "Chairman of the Board" in The Rat Pack (or The Summit as I believe Sinatra preferred them to be called).  This set off a string of successful films and nightclub performances starring members of the group.  I think my favorite of The Rat Pack films is Robin and the 7 Hoods.

 

He also had his political connections and alleged mob connections, but I am not particularly interested in this aspect of his life.  I am more about his music and his films.  Frank Sinatra was just a cool guy and I think that's what I like about him. 

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http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/music/la-et-ms-hbo-sinatra-all-or-nothing-20150402-story.html

 

This is a two-part documentary.  The first part airs tomorrow and the second part on Monday.  Both parts are set to air at 8pm.

 

This documentary sounds really interesting.  I'm looking forward to seeing it.  I really like Sinatra's music and his films.  I'm looking forward to learning more about his life and career.  Like most performers, his career had its ups and downs, but he always seemed to bounce back. 

 

In the early part of his career, "the bobby soxer years," he was the young crooner--appearing in many musicals.  His three films made with Gene Kelly were among his most successful.  By the 50s, his career was in the slums and he scored a supporting role in From Here to Eternity for which he won an Academy Award.  This film (and subsequent award) revitalized his career and gave him a new image.  While he did make some comedies and musicals, he also took on more serious roles like in The Man With the Golden Arm.  I find some of Sinatra's more serious roles among his most interesting, even though I definitely like his comedies and musicals.  I find that he's often cast as the suave bachelor playboy (The Tender Trap and Come Blow Your Horn), which for whatever, seems to suit his image well.

 

By the end of the 50s, he took on his role as "Chairman of the Board" in The Rat Pack (or The Summit as I believe Sinatra preferred them to be called).  This set off a string of successful films and nightclub performances starring members of the group.  I think my favorite of The Rat Pack films is Robin and the 7 Hoods.

 

He also had his political connections and alleged mob connections, but I am not particularly interested in this aspect of his life.  I am more about his music and his films.  Frank Sinatra was just a cool guy and I think that's what I like about him. 

 

I give Frank a lot of credit for being able to pull off the suave bachelor playboy since he wasn't close to good looking (but did get better looking with age).   My wife says he is down right ugly (with his face so thin looking he does look like a meth head to some degree).

 

Of course,  like you my wife prefers Errol! 

 

I don't have HBO but I would love to see this series.    As for cool;  standing up for the rights of his friend Sammy wasn't a popular thing to do at the time.   Frank helped push the envelop and that took guts. 

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Well, as long as it's a documentary and not some kind of "biopic". I saw the latter - some kind of dramatized bio of Frank Sinatra - years ago, and it was not particularly good.

But this sounds different.

I guess I can handle skipping Easter Parade to watch a well-made doc about one of my favourite singers this Sunday.

Thanks for the heads-up, speed, baby.

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I give Frank a lot of credit for being able to pull off the suave bachelor playboy since he wasn't close to good looking (but did get better looking with age).   My wife says he is down right ugly (with his face so thin looking he does look like a meth head to some degree).

 

Of course,  like you my wife prefers Errol! 

 

I don't have HBO but I would love to see this series.    As for cool;  standing up for the rights of his friend Sammy wasn't a popular thing to do at the time.   Frank helped push the envelop and that took guts. 

Lol.  Well of course Frank doesn't hold a candle to Errol in the looks department; but I don't find him as hideous as your wife does.  I agree that he looked better as he aged-- while still thin, he did fill out a little bit and his face wasn't so pointy (it's the only word I can think of right now).  I also liked that he ditched the curly hair. 

 

He wasn't a big guy, but I think his tough personality and put together persona made up for what he lacked in stature. 

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The director of the Sinatra documentary -- the Oscar-winning filmmaker Alex Gibney ("Taxi to the Dark Side") -- is on a roll. He also was responsible for HBO's controversial new documentary about Scientology.

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http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/music/la-et-ms-hbo-sinatra-all-or-nothing-20150402-story.html

 

This is a two-part documentary.  The first part airs tomorrow and the second part on Monday.  Both parts are set to air at 8pm.

 

This documentary sounds really interesting.  I'm looking forward to seeing it.  I really like Sinatra's music and his films.  I'm looking forward to learning more about his life and career.  Like most performers, his career had its ups and downs, but he always seemed to bounce back. 

 

In the early part of his career, "the bobby soxer years," he was the young crooner--appearing in many musicals.  His three films made with Gene Kelly were among his most successful.  By the 50s, his career was in the slums and he scored a supporting role in From Here to Eternity for which he won an Academy Award.  This film (and subsequent award) revitalized his career and gave him a new image.  While he did make some comedies and musicals, he also took on more serious roles like in The Man With the Golden Arm.  I find some of Sinatra's more serious roles among his most interesting, even though I definitely like his comedies and musicals.  I find that he's often cast as the suave bachelor playboy (The Tender Trap and Come Blow Your Horn), which for whatever, seems to suit his image well.

 

By the end of the 50s, he took on his role as "Chairman of the Board" in The Rat Pack (or The Summit as I believe Sinatra preferred them to be called).  This set off a string of successful films and nightclub performances starring members of the group.  I think my favorite of The Rat Pack films is Robin and the 7 Hoods.

 

He also had his political connections and alleged mob connections, but I am not particularly interested in this aspect of his life.  I am more about his music and his films.  Frank Sinatra was just a cool guy and I think that's what I like about him. 

 

 

Of course my favorite Frankie flick is “The Joker is Wild” (1957) - recently CBS Sunday Morning News aired a story in which Frank’s daughter Nancy indicated the conundrum’s Frank’s friendship with Sammy Davis Jr. placed him in – such as those with his friendship to President John F. Kennedy, who invited Frank to his presidential inaugural while making it clear that Sammy’s “kind” were not allowed – perhaps such bigotry of the Kennedy’s will be something the HBO documentary will touch upon?

 

The greatest story ever to be told continues to be that of mankind. 

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Of course my favorite Frankie flick is “The Joker is Wild” (1957) - recently CBS Sunday Morning News aired a story in which Frank’s daughter Nancy indicated the conundrum’s Frank’s friendship with Sammy Davis Jr. placed him in – such as those with his friendship to President John F. Kennedy, who invited Frank to his presidential inaugural while making it clear that Sammy’s “kind” were not allowed – perhaps such bigotry of the Kennedy’s will be something the HBO documentary will touch upon?

 

 

 

That probably had a lot to do with Davis' romance with the Swedish actress May Britt. Supposedly, the Kennedy camp didn't want to deal with a celebrity interracial marriage during the campaign. Davis married May Britt on November 13, 1960, almost two weeks after John F. Kennedy was elected president. Sinatra was the best man at their wedding. Kennedy's sister Pat Lawford attended with her husband Peter. 

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The director of the Sinatra documentary -- the Oscar-winning filmmaker Alex Gibney ("Taxi to the Dark Side") -- is on a roll. He also was responsible for HBO's controversial new documentary about Scientology.

HBO usually does a good job with this kind of thing. A few years ago there was an terrific 2-part documentary of George Harrison directed by Martin Scorsese, so I have "high hopes" for the Sinatra documentary. I think enough time has passed that people who are willing to speak wouldn't be so worried about stepping on any toes. I'm not sure anything like this could have come together while he was still living. I'm not talking about fear of reprisals, more about the natural reluctance of many people to speak candidly about the living. I'm hoping there'll be a lot of emphasis on the music, not just the movies and the personal life.

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Lol.  Well of course Frank doesn't hold a candle to Errol in the looks department; but I don't find him as hideous as your wife does.  I agree that he looked better as he aged-- while still thin, he did fill out a little bit and his face wasn't so pointy (it's the only word I can think of right now).  I also liked that he ditched the curly hair. 

 

He wasn't a big guy, but I think his tough personality and put together persona made up for what he lacked in stature. 

I disagree completely. I think the young '40s Frankie was really sexy. As he got older, he got uglier. And an angular face usually looks better than a "filled-out" face. His angular face highlighted his blue eyes.

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I disagree completely. I think the young '40s Frankie was really sexy. As he got older, he got uglier. And an angular face usually looks better than a "filled-out" face. His angular face highlighted his blue eyes.

 

Yeah, gotta agree with ya here, DGF. 

 

Speaking of which...The following 1948 Tex Avery cartoon sure makes good fun of how over-the-moon many young women were for Frankie back his younger and thinner days....

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ic_8LGqsxQ0

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I disagree completely. I think the young '40s Frankie was really sexy. As he got older, he got uglier. And an angular face usually looks better than a "filled-out" face. His angular face highlighted his blue eyes.

 

But 1940s Frankie wasn't as cool as "Ol' Blue Eyes" of the late 1950s or "The Chairman of the Board" of the 1960s and thereafter.

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Yeah, gotta agree with ya here, DGF. 

 

Speaking of which...The following 1948 Tex Avery cartoon sure makes good fun of how over-the-moon many young women were for Frankie back his younger and thinner days....

 

 

 

I'm surprised.   Like I said to me early 40's Frank looks like a meth head.  Weak and strung out looking, with his face being all drawn in.        Oh, well,  he wasn't my type to begin with!     Of course maybe I'm just knocking him down for what he did to Ava's looks.   

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I'm surprised.   Like I said to me early 40's Frank looks like a meth head.  Weak and strung out looking, with his face being all drawn in.        Oh, well,  he wasn't my type to begin with!     Of course maybe I'm just knocking him down for what he did to Ava's looks.   

 

LOL

 

Well, from what I hear James, the luscious Ava's much too quick physical deterioration was mostly self-induced.

 

(...as in: "Bend elbow..Insert potent potable of choice and three packs of smokes into oral cavity, daily")

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Yeah, gotta agree with ya here, DGF. 

 

Speaking of which...The following 1948 Tex Avery cartoon sure makes good fun of how over-the-moon many young women were for Frankie back his younger and thinner days....

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ic_8LGqsxQ0

In the interest of full disclosure, I weigh about the same as the young Frankie.

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In the interest of full disclosure, I weigh about the same as the young Frankie.

 

Yeah, but the difference here of course being that during his formative years, Frankie probably never attended any spinning classes in Hoboken NJ!!! ;)

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I'm surprised.   Like I said to me early 40's Frank looks like a meth head.  Weak and strung out looking, with his face being all drawn in.        Oh, well,  he wasn't my type to begin with!     Of course maybe I'm just knocking him down for what he did to Ava's looks.   

This post sounds like it was done by, say, Governor Chris Christie.

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This post sounds like it was done by, say, Governor Chris Christie.

 

Hey, btw, I thought the guy had had one of those lap band thingies inserted into him a while back?

 

So how come HIS face(and the rest of him for that matter) isn't "all drawn in" by now?

 

(...so what's up with that, huh?!)

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This post sounds like it was done by, say, Governor Chris Christie.

 

Don't agree at all.   There is a major difference between being too thin looking and being fat.   

 

Frank in the late 50s and 60s wasn't close to being like Christie,  but to me he looked better with a fuller looking face and body than he did before.

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Don't agree at all.   There is a major difference between being too thin looking and being fat.   

 

Frank in the late 50s and 60s wasn't close to being like Christie,  but to me he looked better with a fuller looking face and body than he did before.

 

Then James, I take it you probably also always thought Lee Van Cleef and Jack Palance looked like tweekers too, RIGHT?! ;)

 

(...not to mention Peter Cushing!!!)

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Then James, I take it you probably also always thought Lee Van Cleef and Jack Palance looked like tweekers too, RIGHT?! ;)

 

(...not to mention Peter Cushing!!!)

 

Both Lee and Jack did have that type of look especially early in their career.    I don't view either of them as handsome men and that is one of the reasons.

 

As for Cushing;  well it is hard to put on weight when one has a diet like he had.   Man can't live on only blood! 

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That probably had a lot to do with Davis' romance with the Swedish actress May Britt. Supposedly, the Kennedy camp didn't want to deal with a celebrity interracial marriage during the campaign. Davis married May Britt on November 13, 1960, almost two weeks after John F. Kennedy was elected president. Sinatra was the best man at their wedding. Kennedy's sister Pat Lawford attended with her husband Peter. 

 

 

The story goes that Davis agreed to postpone his wedding to Britt until after the elections. But before Britt, Davis fell in love with Kim Novak in 1957. When Columbia's Harry Cohan found out about his new star and Davis he ordered a hit with the mob. Not to kill him but to break his legs and take out his other eye. Very soon after Davis married a African American Vegas showgirl with the promise that she would have all the rights of a wife including a big cash advance and that the marriage would be annulled within a year. Sinatra remained close to Davis during the Novak affair.....

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The story goes that Davis agreed to postpone his wedding to Britt until after the elections. But before Britt, Davis fell in love with Kim Novak in 1957. When Columbia's Harry Cohan found out about his new star and Davis he ordered a hit with the mob. Not to kill him but to break his legs and take out his other eye. Very soon after Davis married a African American Vegas showgirl with the promise that she would have all the rights of a wife including a big cash advance and that the marriage would be annulled within a year. Sinatra remained close to Davis during the Novak affair.....

 

As it turned out, Sinatra's mob ties were too much for the Kennedys and they stopped communicating with him. In turn, Sinatra eventually stopped speaking to old friend (and Kennedy in-law) Peter Lawford and evolved into a Republican.

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  • 1 month later...

As it turned out, Sinatra's mob ties were too much for the Kennedys and they stopped communicating with him. In turn, Sinatra eventually stopped speaking to old friend (and Kennedy in-law) Peter Lawford and evolved into a Republican.

As it turned out, Sinatra's mob ties were too much for the Kennedys

 

Bigger hypocrites were never born. Joe the adulterer got Frank to twist arms to win it for the adulterer Jr., but after Sonny Boy got the prize, Frank was dead meat.

 

Good for Frankie that he hated the Kennedys for the rest of his life. They were scum.

 

Good documentary, btw. Man could he sing. Shoulda never come back after his retirement performance, though. Didn't know when to say when.

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