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2 of Mitchum's Best-Early Tuesday AM


ElCid
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Two of Robert Mitchum's best (IMO) are on late Monday/early Tuesday-1:45 AM and 3:15AM, April 7th.  

Macao with Jane Russell and His Kind of Woman with Jane Russell.  These could be considered Film Noir or mystery or something else.  I like them because they have a certain comedic element and Mitchum and Russell do it well.  William Bendix, Gloria Graham and Vincent Price also have very good performances in them.

Not shown on TCM too often and not available separately, if at all.  So, might want to record them.

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I will resist the obvious and crude pun that tempts me, and merely point out that many would consider "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" one of the lady's best. (Which is on in about half an hour as I write this.)

 

GPB is likely to be her most popular film but to me the two noirs she made with Mitchum are her best films  i.e. my favorite Russell films.

 

Macao is kind of a mess (e.g.  two directors, a lot of retakes, and drama on the set between Gloria and Ray),  but it ends up being a very good film.    It has one of the best lines ever from Russell when she tells Mitchum that he belted her with that blonde (that blonde being Gloria of course).

 

His Kind of Women is my favor Mitchum film.  Great balance with Burr representing evil and Price representing the light funny campy side.  

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Oh, settle down. I'm just being silly. Even I think those last two posts I wrote aren't worth having an opinion about. I don't know why I did it, I usually loathe "t and a" puns. Cheap and dumb, not to mention unfunny and sexist.

However, I really do think "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" is a good film, and one of Jane Russell's best.

 

I can see why the original poster cited Robert Mitchum, and not Jane Russell, for Macao and His Kind of Woman. These two titles are considered to be noirs, albeit, as TheCid mentioned, not "textbook" noirs, as they're both semi-comedies as well. (A lot of noirs are funny, though...)

Mitch is one of those actors closely associated with film noir, Jane Russell not really.

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His Kind of Women is my favor Mitchum film.  Great balance with Burr representing evil and Price representing the light funny campy side.  

Also like the presence of Tim Holt, who apparently was given a temporary break from filming westerns at RKO.

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I like the sexy chemistry that Jane Russell had with Robert Mitchum in these two films. (She wrote in her autobiography that naughty Bobby would sometimes secretly lick her back or shoulders when they were performing together).

 

But the Jane Russell that I think I like the best of all is the Russell of Technicolor musical comedies like Gentlemen Prefer Blondes and Son of Paleface, two films in which she enjoyed further screen chemistry with her co-stars, this time MM and Bob Hope. These films allowed her comedy finesse to more fully emerge, combined with her skill at brassy musical numbers. And she's also, of course, darned sexy doing all this stuff, too.

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But the Jane Russell that I think I like the best of all is the Russell of Technicolor musical comedies like Gentlemen Prefer Blondes and Son of Paleface, two films in which she enjoyed further screen chemistry with her co-stars, this time MM and Bob Hope. These films allowed her comedy finesse to more fully emerge, combined with her skill at brassy musical numbers. And she's also, of course, darned sexy doing all this stuff, too.

This is the reason I like her so much in MONTANA BELLE, an otherwise thankless assignment during her days with Hughes-- but the Trucolor photography is excellent, she gets some memorable campy moments to play, and she works well with George Brent. Plus it's almost like she gets to give her best Dietrich imitation in the musical scenes inside the saloon. Though it was released in '52, I believe it was made three or four years earlier. And when they started to shoot it, the plan was to dub her numbers, but then they found out the lady could sing. 

 

Incidentally, whenever I watch RANCHO NOTORIOUS, which Dietrich just absolutely nails, I always feel Russell would have been just as good in that one-- and I wonder if Hughes didn't have the script written with her in mind.

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I really liked Jane Russell in the films she made with Robert Mitchum and also GPB---but two of my favorite films of hers are Underwater! with Richard Egan and Foxfire with Jeff Chandler( which I don't believe has ever played on TCM)

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I really liked Jane Russell in the films she made with Robert Mitchum and also GPB---but two of my favorite films of hers are Underwater! with Richard Egan and Foxfire with Jeff Chandler( which I don't believe has ever played on TCM)

She also made REVOLT OF MAMIE STOVER with Egan. 

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Two of Robert Mitchum's best (IMO) are on late Monday/early Tuesday-1:45 AM and 3:15AM, April 7th.  

Macao with Jane Russell and His Kind of Woman with Jane Russell.  These could be considered Film Noir or mystery or something else.  I like them because they have a certain comedic element and Mitchum and Russell do it well.  William Bendix, Gloria Graham and Vincent Price also have very good performances in them.

Not shown on TCM too often and not available separately, if at all.  So, might want to record them.

Have never seen 'His Kind Of Woman', and from what's been said here, sorry to have missed it.

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Have never seen 'His Kind Of Woman', and from what's been said here, sorry to have missed it.

Maybe they will show it again.  Macao, His Kind of Woman and The Big Steal are three Mitchum movies that are mysteries from same period, but have more humor in them than most.  Jane Greer is costar in Big Steal.   Fairly different from Out of the Past due to more levity.  William Bendix is also in it.

I first saw Macao and The Big Steal when TCM was doing a William Bendix day.

For some reason, I tend to like the late '40's and '50's movies set in Mexico or other foreign locations.

Macao and His Kind of Woman are available on the Noir sets, but on different ones.

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For some reason, I tend to like the late '40's and '50's movies set in Mexico or other foreign locations.

 

It certainly adds to a film's flavour and sense of authenticity if filmed on location. I'm usually fairly forgiving of rear screen projection but sometimes, if it's really obvious, it can be a real distraction. The Mexican location shooting is among the strongest attributes of The Big Steal.

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