Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Casablanca (1942) with black bars..?


Kid Dabb
 Share

Recommended Posts

I caught the last ten minutes of the Adventures of Robin Hood this morning and saw that it was compressed into a box square in the middle of the TV screen, with black bars on both the tops and sides of the screen. It's always been full screen before. The film itself took up perhaps 80% to 85% of my TV screen instead of the usual 100%.

 

I've never seen TCM present a film like this before.

 

The next film to come on, Elizabeth and Essex, was full screen.

 

Yankee Doodle Dandy just started. At first I thought it was full screen but now I see that it, too, has thin bars along the sides, and thinner ones at the top and bottom. Like Robin Hood it is like a box, but, since it is almost full screen, it is not nearly as pronounced as was Robin Hood.

 

With Yankee Doodle some might not even notice it, but with that Robin Hood presentation this morning the compressed image was unmistakable.

 

What gives?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just got in and caught the final scene and noticed today's version had black side bars.

 

Hmm.... I've never seen any black side bars in Casablanca. They must be located on side streets that aren't usually shown in the film.

 

:)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I caught the last ten minutes of the Adventures of Robin Hood this morning and saw that it was compressed into a box square in the middle of the TV screen, with black bars on both the tops and sides of the screen. It's always been full screen before. The film itself took up perhaps 80% to 85% of my TV screen instead of the usual 100%.

 

I've never seen TCM present a film like this before.

 

The next film to come on, Elizabeth and Essex, was full screen.

 

Yankee Doodle Dandy just started. At first I thought it was full screen but now I see that it, too, has thin bars along the sides, and thinner ones at the top and bottom. Like Robin Hood it is like a box, but, since it is almost full screen, it is not nearly as pronounced as was Robin Hood.

 

With Yankee Doodle some might not even notice it, but with that Robin Hood presentation this morning the compressed image was unmistakable.

 

What gives?

The non-widescreen movies that are being window-boxed are likely in high definition.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The non-widescreen movies that are being window-boxed are likely in high definition.

 

Can you tell if the windowboxed area of Casablanca or other 4:3 films ware still in 4:3, or have they been cut at the top and bottom to make them appear to be "wide screen" films?

 

The History Channel's VIETNAM IN HIGH DEFINITION and WW II IN HIGH DEFINITION are cropped top and bottom so the images will be wide screen, even though the original images were shot in 4:3 on 16mm and 35mm film. Consequently, the tops of some heads are cut off in the HD versions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Right, the standard definition feed is now a downgrade of the HD feed.

I think this took effect a few months ago.

I dunno. It's only today that I saw a small box compressed image of a film for the first time, and I've been watching or glancing at the TCM image for the past few months, along with dozens and dozens of recordings, none of them looking like this.

 

This, to me, is something new.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can you tell if the windowboxed area of Casablanca or other 4:3 films ware still in 4:3, or have they been cut at the top and bottom to make them appear to be "wide screen" films?

 

.

It was a complete image of Robin Hood, top, bottom and sides.Nothing cut off from what I could tell. Just smaller than ever before.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can you tell if the windowboxed area of Casablanca or other 4:3 films ware still in 4:3, or have they been cut at the top and bottom to make them appear to be "wide screen" films?

 

The History Channel's VIETNAM IN HIGH DEFINITION and WW II IN HIGH DEFINITION are cropped top and bottom so the images will be wide screen, even though the original images were shot in 4:3 on 16mm and 35mm film. Consequently, the tops of some heads are cut off in the HD versions.

 

What you're referring to on the History Channel is the "stretching" of a film shot in 4:3 to create  faux widescreen.

And, yes, this does result in the cropping of the top and bottom.

 

Window boxing on a HD channel preserves the original 4:3 aspect ratio of a film.

The 4:3 image is surrounded by black (which covers the remainder of the 16:9 screen). 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What you're referring to on the History Channel is the "stretching" of a film shot in 4:3 to create  faux widescreen.

And, yes, this does result in the cropping of the top and bottom.

 

Window boxing on a HD channel preserves the original 4:3 aspect ratio of a film.

Once again, the Robin Hood image this morning was that of a box in the centre of the TV, with bars on top, bottom and both sides of the TV screen. I saw no sign that any of the image of the film itself had been cropped.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Once again, the Robin Hood image this morning was that of a box in the centre of the TV, with bars on top, bottom and both sides of the TV screen. I saw no sign that any of the image of the film itself had been cropped.

 

Correct, window boxing does not crop the image.

The entire 4:3 image is preserved.

 

The faux widescreening on The History Channel that Fred was referencing does crop the 4:3 image that has been stretched to 16:9.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What you're referring to on the History Channel is the "stretching" of a film shot in 4:3 to create  faux widescreen.

And, yes, this does result in the cropping of the top and bottom.

 

Stretching is different from cropping. Stretching  uses the full image but when stretched sideways, it makes everyone look short and fat. Cropping doesn't distort the image, it just cuts off some of the top and bottom by removing that area of the 4:3 film.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Stretching is different from cropping. Stretching  uses the full image but when stretched sideways, it makes everyone look short and fat. Cropping doesn't distort the image, it just cuts off some of the top and bottom by removing that area of the 4:3 film.

 

You are correct. The image is not actually stretched. The aspect ratio of 4:3 is stretched to 16:9, but this is accomplished through cropping the vertical not actually stretching the image.

Sorry for the confusion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You are correct. The image is not actually stretched. The aspect ratio of 4:3 is stretched to 16:9, but this is accomplished through cropping the vertical not actually stretching the image.

Sorry for the confusion.

 

In some cases, I've seen the image actually stretched, which is more of a distortion than an image that is cropped. The History channel shows look cropped top and bottom to me, but not stretched.

 

BELOW.......

 

Left is a 4:3 image containing a circle, shown with black bars left and right on a 16:9 screen.

 

Center is a streched 4:3 image, stretched left and right, but without any cropping.

 

Right is a cropped 4:3 image but with no stretching. Note that a "hat" on top of that circle would be cropped out of the 16:9 image.

 

We normally see pillar boxed images of old 4:3 films on TCM, with no stretching and no cropping, such as what is shown in the first image here:

 

43in169.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have TCM HD. The black bars on the left and right of the film means it is projected in the right ratio. Sometimes film credits are WINDOWBOXED. I do not know why the whole movie ROBIN HOOD would appear window boxed which would make the image much smaller.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

BELOW.......

 

Left is a 4:3 image containing a circle, shown with black bars left and right on a 16:9 screen.

 

43in169.png

 

What I saw Casablanca as this morning, from Fred's images, appeared to be "Pillar-boxed"

 

Not the wide sidebars.. narrow, like the image here. I saw Robin Hood full screen - curious.

 

With the changes cable providers have made recently, I'm having to change my ratio settings every time I switch channels, and now, every time a different feed on the same channel comes in. When I was watching local news last night, the news was full screen, the first commercial went to 4 : 3, the next to 16 : 9, then back to full screen for the news again.

 

Help me get off this crazy merry-go-round!

:wacko:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

Help me get off this crazy merry-go-round!

:wacko:

 

When PASSAGE TO MARSEILLE started, it was window boxed, with black bars all around.

 

As I switched my TV screen shape and size from #1 to #2 to #3 to #4, the picture re-set itself to black bars only on the right and left sides, as in my example #1 shown below with the first circle, which is "normal" for a 4:3 movie shown on TCM.

  :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would like to know how to turn off the SAP thing. I've tried all my remotes and still can't get rid of the reader.

Do you hear another language when some, but not all, programs are broadcast? ; or do you see closed-caption words at the bottom of the screen?

 

There used to be a SAP button on many remotes, or a menu item labeled SAP. Now, as on my tv, it's buried in the menu and labeled Language (English, Spanish, or French, e.g). I guess this is because many or all broadcasters are including the SAP in their signal (as they now include display ratios.. ugghh!), so you don't need to turn it off or on because it's always on - just select the language you want and your tv will auto-detect their SAP signal, check your setting and change it. If this is what's going on with your tv, and you're getting a non-English language, you just need to change it back to English and your tv will ignore the SAP signal when it comes in.

 

Theoretically..

 

p.s. When you say "can't get rid of the reader", do you mean you're seeing words of dialog at the bottom of your screen? If so, that's Closed-Captioning - not SAP. Look for a CC button on your remote.

(i've worn away the increments on my slide rule)

:P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

By reader I mean the woman doing the narration. And it's in English. No subtitles. It happens on this film, Key Largo, To Kill a Mockingbird and a few others. And only on TCM.

                Aha! Descriptive Video Service (or Descriptive Audio Service)

                          I used to listen to shows this way ON PURPOSE !

:)

 

                On your remote - go to TCM and hit the INFO button

                   Does the channel display also say Stereo + SAP..

                                      or something like that?

 

Who's your cable provider? What brand of tv do you have?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...