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Not one word for Anthony Quinn


slaytonf
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I'm not surprised.  I'm not over-enthoused about Anthony Quinn myself.  Not that he wasn't a great actor.  Or that he wasn't in any great movies.  He has as impressive a filmography as any, with many good and memorable films, and a couple masterpieces.  He was certainly appreciated by his fellow professionals in the industry. How many actors have even one Oscar, let alone two?  But I don't see him generating the same interest or excitement as other Stars of the Month.  No swooning or wooziness that you get with the likes of Joel McCrea or Miss Davis.  Perhaps his persona isn't so comfortable.  His demeanor and voice are rough and raspy. And his roles, notwithstanding Alexis Zorba, don't allow us to get to like him.  Anyway, we have a month of his films.  Any besides the usual suspects that are worth a look?

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My favorite Quinn performance is his work in "The Guns of Navarone" (1961), in which he plays Colonel Andrea Stavrou. He's a Greek nationalist who takes part in a commando raid on the Nazi fortress that threatens Allied shipping routes. After the mission is completed and he vows to return to an occupied Greek village, Stavrou delivers one of my favorite movie lines: "Well, I'm not so easy to kill."

 

 

 

I regret that Quinn only directed one movie (another favorite of mine, the 1958 version of "The Buccaneer"). I love the action scenes during the 1815 Battle of New Orleans. I still get chills as the motley group of American defenders -- led by General Andrew Jackson (Charlton Heston) -- await an early morning attack by British forces at Chalmette.

 

It's a shame that it took years for Quinn to become a leading man. Imagine the films he could have done if he had become a star much earlier in his career.

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The Mighty Anthony Quinn

 

"The Mighty Quinn (Quinn The Eskimo)"

"...When Quinn the Eskimo gets here everybody's gonna jump for joy..."

"But when Quinn the Eskimo gets here the pigeons gonna run to him..."

"...When Quinn the Eskimo gets here everybody's gonna want to doze
Oh come all without, come all within
You'll not see nothing like the mighty Quinn
Come all without, come all within
You'll not see nothing like the mighty Quinn."

 

Lyrics from the 1968 song written by Bob Dylan,  believed to have been inspired by Dylan being impressed by the title character from actor Anthony Quinn's role as an Eskimo in the movie THE SAVAGE INNOCENTS (1960).  

 

When I first saw the title of this thread I thought that it was referring to the miniscule one minute short TCM produced for it's April Star Of The Month. Sadly, Not the first time such a neglectful tribute has happened.

And for a two time Oscar winner with over 150 feature films to his credit, and a career spanning 65 years (from 1936 to his death in 2001), a mere 20 seems a pittance of a tribute... but again, not the first time.

 

At the beginning of his film career, when he married actress Katherine DeMille (adopted daughter of the Great Cecil), Anthony Quinn had leading man good looks. But the role of leading man eluded him, and he more often than not played heavys opposite leading men.

Eventually he migrated more and more into playing the variety of ethnic parts that his dark, Latin ethnicity afforded him. From Indians, Eskimo's, Arabs, Greeks, Italians, Spaniards, and even a Mexican or two, he played them all convincingly and with apparent ease.

He became a classic and great character actor, and like the great Muni, many found it difficult to distinguish Quinn, the sometimes almost unrecognizable actor, from the roles that he played so well.

This was perhaps his pitfall, that and that few people except those very close to him understood just how much he invested of himself into those roles, and how deeply and physically some of them affected him. His last wife and widow, Katherine (Benvin) Quinn, shared how her husband would sometimes develope some type of stigmata like blemish while "finding himself" in a particular character for which he could become obsessed with great passion.

 

Painter, sculpter, writer, multilinguist, and full of worldly knowlege, Anthony Quinn was much the renaissance man, a polymath as such and the equal of an early Brando.

And, as evidenced by his 3 wives, partner, and twelve children, Quinn was quite the lover, and prolific in more ways than one.

 

And as Bob Dylan so succinctly put in song, "You'll not see nothing like the mighty Quinn." ;)

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I regret that Quinn only directed one movie (another favorite of mine, the 1958 version of "The Buccaneer"). I love the action scenes during the 1815 Battle of New Orleans. I still get chills as the motley group of American defenders -- led by General Andrew Jackson (Charlton Heston) -- await an early morning attack by British forces at Chalmette.

 

I saw that production of The Buccaneer as a boy -- loved it! Never realized that Quinn directed it.  I still think Quinn should have won the Best Actor Oscar for Zorba the Greek -- a big, OTT performance for a big, OTT character. That year was the low point for the Best Actor Oscar -- everybody (Quinn, O'Toole, Burton, Sellers) deserved it more than the boring winner (Harrison).

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I'm not surprised.  I'm not over-enthoused about Anthony Quinn myself.  Not that he wasn't a great actor.  Or that he wasn't in any great movies.  He has as impressive a filmography as any, with many good and memorable films, and a couple masterpieces.  He was certainly appreciated by his fellow professionals in the industry. How many actors have even one Oscar, let alone two?  But I don't see him generating the same interest or excitement as other Stars of the Month.  No swooning or wooziness that you get with the likes of Joel McCrea or Miss Davis.  Perhaps his persona isn't so comfortable.  His demeanor and voice are rough and raspy. And his roles, notwithstanding Alexis Zorba, don't allow us to get to like him.  Anyway, we have a month of his films.  Any besides the usual suspects that are worth a look?

If Quinn  doesn't generate more swooning or wooziness than June Allyson, then he should pack his bags and go.'

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I don't ever remember not liking Anthony Quinn.  I didn't know he WAS Mexican untill I saw him on Dick Cavett's show in '72.  I always thought it odd he played everything ELSE in movies( Greeks, Arabs, Hebrews, Italians,  Native Americans, Turks...).

 

I remember hearing a story( not sure it's true) that a report filed after an audition for the role of a Mexican bandito in some movie from the '30's read, "Nice looking guy, but doesn't look Mexican enough, though his accent is OK."

 

Sounded like some kind of personal joke, like ME, saying I'm a "lousy Polack" because I don't like or drink beer, and can't BOWL worth a sh!t....

 

I don't think I can narrow it down to my "favorite" Anthony Quinn movie!

 

 

Sepiatone

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I don't ever remember not liking Anthony Quinn.  I didn't know he WAS Mexican untill I saw him on Dick Cavett's show in '72.  I always thought it odd he played everything ELSE in movies( Greeks, Arabs, Hebrews, Italians,  Native Americans, Turks...).

 

I remember hearing a story( not sure it's true) that a report filed after an audition for the role of a Mexican bandito in some movie from the '30's read, "Nice looking guy, but doesn't look Mexican enough, though his accent is OK."

 

Sounded like some kind of personal joke, like ME, saying I'm a "lousy Polack" because I don't like or drink beer, and can't BOWL worth a sh!t....

 

I don't think I can narrow it down to my "favorite" Anthony Quinn movie!

 

 

Sepiatone

 Eddie Lubanski (OK, google him). Now there's a polack that polacks could be proud of.

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A little-known Anthony Quinn film which will be shown is A Dream of Kings. Quinn is a Greek-American living in Chicago. Irene Pappas plays his wife, Inger Stevens plays his mistress, and Sam Levene is his best friend. All four are very good. Daniel Mann considered this his best film.

 

 

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 Eddie Lubanski (OK, google him). Now there's a polack that polacks could be proud of.

 

Now that's a name I haven't heard since the old Championship Bowling show of the 50's, along with the likes of Don Carter, Bill Lillard, and Eddie Kawolics.  I may be one of 10 living people who can still sing the original theme song.

 

("B-O-W-L, I-N-G,  We go bowling, bowling, bowling, my baby and me...")

 

But somehow I think if I were a Polack I'd be more likely to think of Stanisław Franciszek Musiał when I think of sports heroes.

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A little-known Anthony Quinn film which will be shown is A Dream of Kings. Quinn is a Greek-American living in Chicago. Irene Pappas plays his wife, Inger Stevens plays his mistress, and Sam Levene is his best friend. All four are very good. Daniel Mann considered this his best film.

 

I'll look out for it.

 

I think my opening comments are borne out.  One can imagine the activity on a thread about, say, Bette Davis, Marlon Brando, or Ingrid Bergman.

 

I'd like to add that the framing sequences for Mr. Quinn's movies are especially substantive and interesting.  A cut way above what we usually get from The Essentials, or Mr. Osborne, and Mr. Mankiewicz solo.

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If you've not seen ACROSS 110th STREET (1972), slaytonf, I'd recommend it if you're not averse to violent 1970s-era NYC-based action movies.  It's THE COPS vs. THE ROBBERS vs. THE MAFIA after three small-time black criminals make the mistake of robbing the wrong people. 

 

     There's a nice contrast between the policemen played Anthony Quinn and Yaphet Kotto.  Makes the New York City of 1972 look like a violent sewer.       

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If you've not seen ACROSS 110th STREET (1972), slaytonf, I'd recommend it if you're not averse to violent 1970s-era NYC-based action movies.  It's THE COPS vs. THE ROBBERS vs. THE MAFIA after three small-time black criminals make the mistake of robbing the wrong people. 

 

     There's a nice contrast between the policemen played Anthony Quinn and Yaphet Kotto.  Makes the New York City of 1972 look like a violent sewer.       

Agree this one should be on my list also.

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If you've not seen ACROSS 110th STREET (1972), slaytonf, I'd recommend it if you're not averse to violent 1970s-era NYC-based action movies.  It's THE COPS vs. THE ROBBERS vs. THE MAFIA after three small-time black criminals make the mistake of robbing the wrong people. 

 

     There's a nice contrast between the policemen played Anthony Quinn and Yaphet Kotto.  Makes the New York City of 1972 look like a violent sewer.       

This film has one of the best title songs ever, from the great Bobby Womack.

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  • 3 weeks later...

A few more words for Anthony Quinn - I thoroughly enjoyed his April Star of the Month.  I got to see 7 of his films for the first time on his designated night, plus one - "The Brave Bulls" - from another night. 

 

Last night, I enjoyed "The Wild Party" - described on my TV guide as "Brute and beatniks kidnap squares", with characters with names like "Kicks" (Nehemiah Persoff), "Gage" and "Honey".

 

Also, last night - "The Naked Street".  Quinn's relationship with his screen sister Anne Bancroft reminded me of Sonny in "The Godfather".  Farley Granger surprised me in this one - he played unrefined very well.

 

Viva Anthony Quinn!

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A few more words for Anthony Quinn - I thoroughly enjoyed his April Star of the Month.  I got to see 7 of his films for the first time on his designated night, plus one - "The Brave Bulls" - from another night. 

 

Last night, I enjoyed "The Wild Party" - described on my TV guide as "Brute and beatniks kidnap squares", with characters with names like "Kicks" (Nehemiah Persoff), "Gage" and "Honey".

 

Also, last night - "The Naked Street".  Quinn's relationship with his screen sister Anne Bancroft reminded me of Sonny in "The Godfather".  Farley Granger surprised me in this one - he played unrefined very well.

 

Viva Anthony Quinn!

 

"Wild Party" was indeed pretty freaky-deaky ;)

on the other hand, "Flap" was just pretty awful! :blink:

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This film has one of the best title songs ever, from the great Bobby Womack.

 

Absolutely----Terrific song, and  I wish they'd shown Across 110th Street instead of the overrated and way overplayed Zorba the Greek.  And I'm not saying that just because I was born on 110th Street myself.

 

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Absolutely----Terrific song, and  I wish they'd shown Across 110th Street instead of the overrated and way overplayed Zorba the Greek.  And I'm not saying that just because I was born on 110th Street myself.

 

 

The clip you've posted is from the Quentin Tarantino movie JACKIE BROWN.

 

To be honest I didn't know there was a movie called ACROSS 110TH STREET. 

I first heard the song "Across 110th Street" (I agree it's a great one) in JACKIE BROWN.

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The clip you've posted is from the Quentin Tarantino movie JACKIE BROWN.

 

Well, that was embarrassing.  I guess I should've gone beyond the song title.  But anyway, here's the original soundtrack version:

 

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The clip you've posted is from the Quentin Tarantino movie JACKIE BROWN.

 

To be honest I didn't know there was a movie called ACROSS 110TH STREET. 

I first heard the song "Across 110th Street" (I agree it's a grea one) in JACKIE BROWN.

The film THE WILD PARTY had one of the worst soundtracks ever. It just screamed----"B" movie.

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The film THE WILD PARTY had one of the worst soundtracks ever. It just screamed----"B" movie.

That whole movie screamed "B".  Not that there's anything wrong with that.

 

Now if you want a truly embarrassing soundtrack for the ages, there's the title soundtrack in Johnny Cool, as sung by Sammy Davis, Jr.  The movie itself wasn't a bad Bizarro variant of a James Bond film up until its brain-dead ending, but it took a stiff drink to make it through the opening credits after listening to this train wreck of a song.

 

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