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.. the scene in Guess Who's Coming to Dinner. Spencer Tracy gives his speech just before dinner about how, in the end, nothing really matters except how they feel about each other. He finishes and we see his and Kate's reactions.

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.. the scene in 12 O'clock High, when Gen Savage (Gregory Peck) is counting the bombers (we do not see, but hear their engines) returning from their mission.. I am counting with him, and then he calls the tower for confirmation.

 

WIKI - Paul Mantz:

 

In 1945, Mantz flew a P-40 and directed aerial sequences in God is My Co-Pilot. Mantz piloted a Boeing B-17 for the belly-landing scenes in Twelve O'Clock High and the footage was reused in several other movies

 

(That scene is early in the film.)

 

 

==================

 

Mantz died on July 8, 1965 while working on the movie The Flight of the Phoenix, produced and directed by Robert Aldrich. Flying a very unusual aircraft, the Tallmantz Phoenix P-1 built especially for the film, Mantz struck a small hillock while skimming over a desert site in Arizona for a second take. As Mantz attempted to recover by opening the throttle to its maximum the over-stressed aircraft broke in two and nosed over into the ground, killing Mantz instantly. (Bobby Rose, a stuntman standing behind Mantz in the cockpit and representing a character played by Hardy Kruger, was seriously injured.)

 

==================

 

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There's lots of scenes I love in lots of movies.

 

What I hate about threads like these is....

 

They just can't be brought to MIND at the time!  :lol:

 

But, I'll offer this......

 

In NORTH BY NORTHWEST, there's a scene in the Chicago train station where a man is announcing a train leaving for Detroit on "track" whatever, over a loudspeaker.  He then announces all the stops the train will make on the way...and he mentions all the Michigan cities in which a train from Chicago WOULD stop in AND in correct order..."Kalamazoo,   Battle Creek,   Jackson,     Ann Arbor,    Ypsilanti...."  Then finally Detroit..

 

Now, what floored me about that was that this movie would get shown nationwide, and WHO the HELL would even CARE what order those Michigan cities are in?  And I've talked to  a few life long Michigan residents who've also seen the movie a few times, but NEVER NOTICED that!

 

 

Sepiatone

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WIKI - Paul Mantz:

 

In 1945, Mantz flew a P-40 and directed aerial sequences in God is My Co-Pilot. Mantz piloted a Boeing B-17 for the belly-landing scenes in Twelve O'Clock High and the footage was reused in several other movies

 

(That scene is early in the film.)

 

 

==================

 

Mantz died on July 8, 1965 while working on the movie The Flight of the Phoenix, produced and directed by Robert Aldrich. Flying a very unusual aircraft, the Tallmantz Phoenix P-1 built especially for the film, Mantz struck a small hillock while skimming over a desert site in Arizona for a second take. As Mantz attempted to recover by opening the throttle to its maximum the over-stressed aircraft broke in two and nosed over into the ground, killing Mantz instantly. (Bobby Rose, a stuntman standing behind Mantz in the cockpit and representing a character played by Hardy Kruger, was seriously injured.)

 

==================

 

that'll do it. :huh:

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The Petrified Forest;  The first time the Bette Davis and Leslie Howard character meet and she sits at his table while he eats his lunch.    I just love the dialog in that scene from my favorite actors.    

I'll take that scene in "The Big Sleep" in which Bogey and Bacall are presumably supposed to be talking about "horses".  ;)

 

 

Sepiatone

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I'll take that scene in "The Big Sleep" in which Bogey and Bacall are presumably supposed to be talking about "horses".  ;)

 

 

Sepiatone

 

Yes, that scene with Bogey and Bacall is a classic one, especially since it wasn't in the original release to the troops but added in after they got married and Jack Warner asked Hawks to bump up the B&B romance factor.

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The sheer bravura of James Cagney's performance at the explosive climax of White Heat.

 

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Surrounded by the cops whom he despises, determined to take as many of them with him as he can, Cagney's homicidal character goes completely over the edge in the film's final minutes. Laughing manically, eyes facing heaven-ward, he stands proudly, defiantly, about to depart this mortal coil on his own terms, as he screams, "Made it, Ma! Top of the world!"

 

At his character's moment of explosive death, Cagney plays the scene with the hutzpah of a man who is triumphant. Cagney would never again have a moment on screen as spectacular as this (how many actors would have a scene this memorable in their entire careers?) but, with his career about to go into a slow but steady decline, this film solidifies Cagney's position as one of the premiere actors of the Golden Era.

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Mirror, mirror on the wall,

Whose reflection is in the hall? 

Dark, swarthy, holding a boom,

Quite the surprise in the Ladies room.

 

 

I love the scenes with mirrors being used.  

 

the-best-years-of-our-lives-1946-fredric

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BP3EDP.jpg

 

 

I keep watching for signs of the crew slipping into view.

 

In The Best Years of Our Lives, there's a tech on the bench watching Teresa Wright and Virginia Mayo.  His arm is visible between Wright's and Mayo's reflection:

 

bestyears7.jpg

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I love the scene in Casablanca when Rick walks up to Doolie Wilson and starts to berate him about As Time Goes By...and then looks at Elsa...the other favourite scene is when Claude Raines stops and reads the label on the Vichy water and throws it in the trash. 

 

Oh yes...I could go on about all the Casablanca scenes I wait to see...I know I know such a fuddy duddy but for me Casablanca is the ultimate.  I guess I have no imagination. 

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The De Gaulle letters of transit in Casablanca were valid and could be used in areas of Africa that were still part of Free French colonies.

 

Casablanca itself was still part of "Free France" at the time of the movie, and the pickpocket at the cafe with the older couple (near the beginning of the film) said the German couriers and their De Gaulle letters of transit were murdered in an area of a Free France zone of the North African desert. The French Resistance was very strong in Algiers, and DeGaulle eventually located his exile "Free French" government in Algiers in North Africa.

 

Casablanca itself was in a delicate situation when the movie first starts... still technically "Free" but gradually being occupied by small groups of military Germans and Italians. They didn't have enough men to completely take over Casablanca at that time, and they were concerned about the rapid progress of the Brits and Yanks who were trying to reach and take over Casablanca for the Allies.

 

So, the letters of transit would have been valid to use to travel to neutral Portugal, ESPECIALLY with the signature of the local Casablanca Chief of Police since Casablanca was still technically "Free".

 

The German couriers had the letters so they could turn them over to German spies so they could travel in Free French areas of North Africa to gether information for their own German forces.

 

At the airport, Captain Renault welcomes Major Strasser to "Free France", and that is why Strasser can not arrest Victor Laszlo and put him in prison in Casablanca.

 

At the end, after the murder of Strasser, Renault suggests to Rick that they get out of town and go to another more distant Free French Garrison. If you check that name in a history book, you will find it is a real name of a  real Free French Garrison south of Casablanca.

 

A few months later, the Brits and Yanks invaded North Africa and took over Casablanca.

 

 


 

Wiki:

 

During World War II Brazzaville, and the rest of French Equatorial Africa, remained beyond the control of Vichy France. In 1944, Brazzaville hosted a meeting of the Free French forces and representatives of France's African colonies.

 

Mention of Brazzaville at end of film:

 

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... when Fredric March comes home to Myrna Loy at the beginning of The Best Years of Our Lives. I may not have time to watch the entire movie whenever it is shown on TCM, but I will always try to catch the beginning of the movie just for that scene.

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Oh yes...I could go on about all the Casablanca scenes I wait to see...I know I know such a fuddy duddy but for me Casablanca is the ultimate.  I guess I have no imagination. 

 

If that is the definition of a fuddy duddy, then it appears that I am a fuddy duddy, too!

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I love the scene in Casablanca when Rick walks up to Doolie Wilson and starts to berate him about As Time Goes By...and then looks at Elsa...the other favourite scene is when Claude Raines stops and reads the label on the Vichy water and throws it in the trash. 

 

Oh yes...I could go on about all the Casablanca scenes I wait to see...I know I know such a fuddy duddy but for me Casablanca is the ultimate.  I guess I have no imagination. 

Oh, Casablanca.. this is the scene for me..

 

Mr. Leuchtag: Liebchen - sweetness, what watch?
 
Mrs. Leuchtag (looking at watch): Ten watch.
 
Mr. Leuchtag: Such much?
 
Carl: Hm. You will get along beautiful in America, mm-hmm.
 
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... The scene in Casablanca when the Renault's men pickup Ugarte at Rick's Cafe, then after the scuffle, Rick calms down the upset patrons, turns upright a fallen cocktail glass, looks at Sam, and says "All right, Sam" -- and Sam- "Okay, boss." starts immediately the next number. 

 

 

 

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I love Jean Harlow when she thinks that William Powell has two wives, and shouts at him, "THAT'S ARSON!"

 

But for the most sublimely enjoyable 10 minutes and 58 seconds of any movie, nothing but nothing can top the "Shanghai Lil" sequence in Footlight Parade.  It's just one of life's little delights that make you glad that you're alive.

 

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xh2bas_shanghai-lil-1933_shortfilms

 

"That oriental dame is detrimental to our industry."

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I love Jean Harlow when she thinks that William Powell has two wives, and shouts at him, "THAT'S ARSON!"

 

But for the most sublimely enjoyable 10 minutes and 58 seconds of any movie, nothing but nothing can top the "Shanghai Lil" sequence in Footlight Parade.  It's just one of life's little delights that make you glad that you're alive.

 

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xh2bas_shanghai-lil-1933_shortfilms

 

"That oriental dame is detrimental to our industry."

 

 

 

Busby had me with his musicals.  I remember seeing them when I was much younger and thinking how racy they were. 

 

 

 

and 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E26DvSf1He4

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There are so many movie moments that I love.  Sometimes for me, these moments are what elevates an otherwise average film into something special. 

 

*In Summer Stock, there are a couple of scenes I love:

 

1) When Judy Garland sings "Friendly Star" after finding herself falling in love with Gene Kelly.  I love how Garland's eyes are watery during her song and I love the moment when we see Gene Kelly listening to her singing about him. 

 

2) When Judy is practicing her role in Gene Kelly's play and Eddie Bracken walks in threatening to break up with her if she continues.  She tells him off, which is awesome, but Bracken dares speak up again and Judy gives him the most hilarious "f--- off" look. 

 

*In All About Eve, I love when Bette Davis tells off Anne Baxter by telling her not to worry about her heart and tells her to put her award where her heart ought to be.

 

*In Gilda, I love Rita Hayworth's entrance.  Her husband calls her name and she enters the scene by flipping her head back and saying "sure. I'm decent."

 

*In The Philadelphia Story, the opening scene when Cary Grant puts the palm of his hand in Katharine Hepburn's face and pushes her backwards.  It cracks me up.

 

*The scene in Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House when Myrna Loy tries to explain to the painters as to what colors (and what shades of each color) she wants the various rooms in her house painted.

 

*The look on Cary Grant's face when he realizes where his aunts have hidden Mr. Hoskins' body in Arsenic and Old Lace.

 

*Pretty much every scene of Errol Flynn in Gentleman Jim.  Yum!

 

So many great movie moments. I could go on and on forever.

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..one scene I was fortunate enough to catch this evening..

 

The Ghost and Mrs. Muir (1947) - when, after being away ten years, Anna Muir returns to Gull Cottage. She and Lucy are in the kitchen. While Anna is getting cups out of the cupboard, she mentions the Captain... then, a moment when Lucy realizes how much of a presence the Captain had been in their family - not just with herself. And he WAS real..

 

You can see the emotions wash across her face.

 

Then the last five minutes. I've always liked the ending.

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