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THE BRAVE BULLS


cody1949
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  Looking forward to this premiere showing of THE BRAVE BULLS  on TCM, or any cable channel for that matter, tomorrow. For me on the west coast, Saturday, 7:30 PM.

I am looking forward to this one. Mel Ferrer made a real splash at the beginning of his film career. Marrying Audrey sort of put him into her shadows-- but he did some interesting work on screen. He deserves more credit than he's typically given.

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I am looking forward to this one. Mel Ferrer made a real splash at the beginning of his film career. Marrying Audrey sort of put him into her shadows-- but he did some interesting work on screen. He deserves more credit than he's typically given.

  Yes indeed !  LOST BOUNDARIES was a very courageous effort for its time,1949.

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I am looking forward to this one. Mel Ferrer made a real splash at the beginning of his film career. Marrying Audrey sort of put him into her shadows-- but he did some interesting work on screen. He deserves more credit than he's typically given.

    Amazing that only TopBilled and myself have anything to say about this film. I guess it bombed at the box office in 1951 and 64 years later it does the same on TCM. I saw the film last night and it deserved a much better fate.

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    Amazing that only TopBilled and myself have anything to say about this film. I guess it bombed at the box office in 1951 and 64 years later it does the same on TCM. I saw the film last night and it deserved a much better fate.

I watched it last night. I was a little disappointed that Osborne didn't even mention Mel Ferrer at all in the opening and closing segments-- the entire focus was on Rossen and on Anthony Quinn (who is getting plenty of discussion on four other nights this month).

 

I felt like the film falls or soars based on Ferrer's performance, and he's actually quite good. I almost wish it had a better budget, because I think it would have been a bit more impressive in Technicolor.

 

Around the same time, Budd Boetticher did his own matador story for Republic with Robert Stack-- BULLFIGHTER AND THE LADY. It would have been nice if Osborne had even mentioned that but he did not. 

 

Whoever's writing the wraparounds needs to do a better job, in my opinion.

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I watched it last night. I was a little disappointed that Osborne didn't even mention Mel Ferrer at all in the opening and closing segments-- the entire focus was on Rossen and on Anthony Quinn (who is getting plenty of discussion on four other nights this month).

 

I felt like the film falls or soars based on Ferrer's performance, and he's actually quite good. I almost wish it had a better budget, because I think it would have been a bit more impressive in Technicolor.

 

Around the same time, Budd Boetticher did his own matador story for Republic with Robert Stack-- BULLFIGHTER AND THE LADY. It would have been nice if Osborne had even mentioned that but he did not. 

 

Whoever's writing the wraparounds needs to do a better job, in my opinion.

    I definitely agree with you about a better budget and Technicolor. Most films that take place in Mexico  should be done in Technicolor with the exceptions being LOS OLVIDADOS and TOUCH OF EVIL. I do think that Mel Ferrer was perfect for the role. Anyway, I am certainly glad I finally got to see it.  Thank you,Sony and TCM. Now, if you could only do THIS THING CALLED LOVE and DEATH OF A SALESMAN.

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    I definitely agree with you about a better budget and Technicolor. Most films that take place in Mexico  should be done in Technicolor with the exceptions being LOS OLVIDADOS and TOUCH OF EVIL. I do think that Mel Ferrer was perfect for the role. Anyway, I am certainly glad I finally got to see it.  Thank you,Sony and TCM. Now, if you could only do THIS THING CALLED LOVE and DEATH OF A SALESMAN.

Agree with you about DEATH OF A SALESMAN.

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How about that car that Ferrer and Quinn were chauffeured around in?  It was a huge, huge convertible - any idea what kind of car it was?  I enjoyed seeing the Mexico of 65 years ago - at least what they showed - anyone catch that giant Coca Cola sign?

 

RO did mention that the cinematographer was Academy Award winner Floyd Crosby - the father of David Crosby of the Byrds back in the day.  I love RO's sharing of trivia like this - I never knew this fact.  He also mentioned the sad ending for Miroslava in real life.

 

I did have to look away/put my hand up to block the screen (I have a small TV) during a lot of the bullfight scenes.  They were the real deal and too much for me.

 

Anthony Quinn had an especially nice laugh in this film.

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Really terrific film.  In some ways better than ALL THE KINGS MEN.  I was a bit suspect about the film transfer, however.  I'm pretty sure it was taken from a 16mm negative.  This would account for the grey image and the flat soundtrack (I have an original 16 and the track is very dynamic - but transferring from a negative would yield high noise and require excessive EQ).

 

Also, there was white dirt but very little black dirt. Again, indicating transfer from negative.

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