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The Sound of Music in theaters!


NYsquirrel83
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TCM, thank you for showing The Sound of Music in theaters!  This movie has been one of my absolute favorites since I was little and my mom has mentioned many times what it was like to see it as a kid in theaters when it came out.  It was nice for the whole family to have that experience this evening, in a mostly full theater with people of all ages .  I was actually quite amazed at how different it was to see it on the big screen, and yet how relaxing it was to just sit back and enjoy.

 

It is a shame that this movie will only be shown in theaters for two days - this is not enough.  It would be terrific if it could be out for a week or two.  Please consider adding on more showings! 

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It is a shame that this movie will only be shown in theaters for two days - this is not enough.  It would be terrific if it could be out for a week or two.  Please consider adding on more showings! 

 

The two-days was just a TCM special event. The actual distribution is up to 20th Century-Fox. Being it's the film's 50th anniversary, it would surprise me if the studio didn't  have a broader theatrical re-release during the year. If they don't,  I think they're missing a good opportunity. Like you, there are a lot of people who'd love to see it on the big screen.

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I suppose this isn't entirely relevant, but I can't resist announcing here that on Friday (the 25th) I'm going to see a live stage production of "The Sound of Music" in Stratford, Ontario.

 

I know this thread is about screenings of the movie, in cinemas. Still, I'm expecting this production to be good.

Also...Christopher Plummer has acted in many Stratford plays, the most recent one being his role as Prospero in The Tempest  (in 2010.)

However, apparently he is not reprising his role as Captain Von Trapp in the production I am attending. :mellow:

 

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The two-days was just a TCM special event. The actual distribution is up to 20th Century-Fox. Being it's the film's 50th anniversary, it would surprise me if the studio didn't  have a broader theatrical re-release during the year. If they don't,  I think they're missing a good opportunity. Like you, there are a lot of people who'd love to see it on the big screen.

 

I wonder how a studio determines if doing a re-release of such an old film is a 'good opportunity' (as in the studio will at least break even).     Of course maybe you are NOT looking at this from a dollar and cents POV but view 'good opportunity' as increasing the value of the brand (but these days I don't think people go to see movies based on the studio releasing the film like they did during the studio-era).

 

I love seeing my favorite studio-era movies on the big screen.   It is a great experience and since I'm only 45 miles from Hollywood there are still special showing from time to time (e.g. UCLA and the LA Museum has events fairly often in their Bing Crosby theater).   

 

But I really question if there is enough interest in these movies to make it 'worth it' for the studio.  

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I wonder how a studio determines if doing a re-release of such an old film is a 'good opportunity' (as in the studio will at least break even).     Of course maybe you are NOT looking at this from a dollar and cents POV but view 'good opportunity' as increasing the value of the brand (but these days I don't think people go to see movies based on the studio releasing the film like they did during the studio-era).

 

I love seeing my favorite studio-era movies on the big screen.   It is a great experience and since I'm only 45 miles from Hollywood there are still special showing from time to time (e.g. UCLA and the LA Museum has events fairly often in their Bing Crosby theater).   

 

But I really question if there is enough interest in these movies to make it 'worth it' for the studio.  

 

Well, SOUND OF MUSIC is probably different than most older films, I think it's held up well for fifty years and still has a very loyal following so it has a good track record. Still, they'd probably want to do a few "test" screenings around the country to see how it does before  doing a full-blown rerelease. I'll bet they've been pouring over the box office totals from TCM's recent showings.

 

I'm sure they've considered the huge ratings that the TV version got last year too. While most critics  considered it "inferior" to the original, that didn't stop 40 million viewers from enjoying it and that could result in a renewed interest for a lot of them to see the film again on the big screen.

 

Another way to go would simply be to make the movie available to any theater that wants to show it and let them handle the local advertising instead of a big national advertising blitz. That would be a lot cheaper for the studio than a formal national release. Now that the the whole industry has switched to digital projection there's no need to make thousands of expensive 35mm prints anymore since digital copies can be made very quickly as needed.

 

Of course, the key factor with any film is how much interest the big national theater chains, like AMC and Regal, have in running it. That's probably what would tip the scales one way or another.

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I see it as a method to get people over 40 back to the theaters.

Actually, that's a good point. The  studios are always bemoaning the fact that people of that age don't go to movies anymore, but they never seem to figure out it's because they don't make anything they want to see badly enough.

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I see it as a method to get people over 40 back to the theaters.

Would anyone over 40 or even 50 want to spend hard earned cash on a film they've already seem umpteen times and probably have on dvd?  I don't know.

With the exception of the fanatical fans of the film, seems to me it might be aimed at parents choosing to expose their kids to it.

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It would be for the same reason I rode with a friend 40 minutes to Ann Arbor's U-M campus to see KING KONG on a large theater screen.  To experience it as those who saw it originally had. 

 

The same reason my wife and her sister, and brother-in-law went to Detroit's Fox Theater to see BEN HUR.  We'd all seen it several times on TV over the years, but seeing it in THAT venue was a unique experience.

 

Same goes for GONE WITH THE WIND at the same theater,..

 

And THE WIZARD OF OZ, CITIZEN KANE, CASABLANCA and QUO VADIS!

 

And, you'd be surprised (or maybe not) at the number of people under 40 that were there for EACH of them!

 

As far as THE SOUND OF MUSIC---over the years it had been re-released to major theaters in this area over the late '60's and through the early to mid '70's that most people had already SEEN it in "theaters" by now...

 

THESE days though, when you hear the sound of music in a theater, it's likely coming from some A**WIPE'S cell phone!  :lol:

 

 

Sepiatone

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I'm assuming it would be in 35mm so it wouldnt be like its original roadshow engagements in Todd-AO.

Now that digital projection has become the new standard for movie exhibition,  theaters that can still show 35mm are hard to find.  I live in a good size city and the closest one is an hour away.  It's even rarer to find one that can show 70mm.

 

With rare exceptions, the studios aren't even making film prints anymore.  It's fair to say that any theater showing THE SOUND OF MUSIC on film would be using an existing print, and there probably aren't many of those still around in good shape.

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Now that digital projection has become the new standard for movie exhibition,  theaters that can still show 35mm are hard to find.  I live in a good size city and the closest one is an hour away.  It's even rarer to find one that can show 70mm.

 

With rare exceptions, the studios aren't even making film prints anymore.  It's fair to say that any theater showing THE SOUND OF MUSIC on film would be using an existing print, and there probably aren't many of those still around in good shape.

The Museum of the Moving Image in New York is showing a brand new, remastered 70MM print of THE SOUND OF MUSIC in May.  The film in 70MM is astonishing, and should be seen that way.  Unfortunately, most cities don't even have a screen that can accommodate it.

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Would anyone over 40 or even 50 want to spend hard earned cash on a film they've already seem umpteen times and probably have on dvd?  I don't know.

 

I know. The answer is no, especially when you consider that, in my neck of the woods, it costs people $12.50 to see it versus $5 for a regular feature.

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The Museum of the Moving Image in New York is showing a brand new, remastered 70MM print of THE SOUND OF MUSIC in May.  The film in 70MM is astonishing, and should be seen that way.  Unfortunately, most cities don't even have a screen that can accommodate it.

If anyone was able to show it in 70mm, I figured it would be in NYC or L.A.  Wish I could get down there to see it.  Like you say though, it's something that the majority of the country can never experience.

 

The first time I saw it, when it was new, was in 70mm (actually I saw it there twice). I've seen some pretty good 35mm showings too, but nothing beats 70mm. Years later, when I was a projectionist, I got to work in a 70mm house and run films like  THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK. That was fun.

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I know. The answer is no, especially when you consider that, in my neck of the woods, it costs people $12.50 to see it versus $5 for a regular feature.

You live somewhere on the planet earth where you only pay $5 to see a movie?

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You live somewhere on the planet earth where you only pay $5 to see a movie?

I

 

You live somewhere on the planet earth where you only pay $5 to see a movie?

 If you look hard enough there's still a few cheap theaters out there. Right in my own backyard, in a suburb of Syracuse, NY there's one called the Hollywood. A second-run theater that charges $2.00 for regular films with a $2.00 surcharge for 3-D movies and only $1.50 on Tuesdays.

 

it's got modern digital projection and plays all the big films. You just have to wait until they finish their first-runs at the multiplexs. Since those charge $11.00 with a $4.00 3-D surcharge or $18.50 to see it in IMAX, it's well worth waiting until it comes to the Hollywood.

 

Anybody know of other cheap theaters?

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I

 

 If you look hard enough there's still a few cheap theaters out there. Right in my own backyard, in a suburb of Syracuse, NY there's one called the Hollywood. A second-run theater that charges $2.00 for regular films with a $2.00 surcharge for 3-D movies and only $1.50 on Tuesdays.

 

it's got modern digital projection and plays all the big films. You just have to wait until they finish their first-runs at the multiplexs. Since those charge $11.00 with a $4.00 3-D surcharge or $18.50 to see it in IMAX, it's well worth waiting until it comes to the Hollywood.

 

Anybody know of other cheap theaters?

Not in my backyard (suburb of D.C.)  Glad to know they still exist somewhere.  Many times I don't even bother going to the theater, and wait for films to be released on Blu-ray, and just buy the ones I would have gone to see.  It ends up costing me less to own a film than for my wife and I to go see one.  Even the 3D ones.

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Not in my backyard (suburb of D.C.)  Glad to know they still exist somewhere.  Many times I don't even bother going to the theater, and wait for films to be released on Blu-ray, and just buy the ones I would have gone to see.  It ends up costing me less to own a film than for my wife and I to go see one.  Even the 3D ones.

I think the main reason there are fewer and fewer, second-run, discount theaters is that the studios keep shortening the release window between the time a movie gets it's theatrical release and when it comes out on DVD or streaming. It's not that uncommon to see the Hollywood playing films after they came out on DVD.

 

Still, it's cheap enough that many people will go there anyway to expereience it on the big screen. That seems to be especially true with 3-D films which has developed into a very nice business for them. It's not that unusual to see a line of folks at the box office when 3-D is playing.

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I think the main reason there are fewer and fewer, second-run, discount theaters is that the studios keep shortening the release window between the time a movie gets it's theatrical release and when it comes out on DVD or streaming. It's not that uncommon to see the Hollywood playing films after they came out on DVD.

 

Still, it's cheap enough that many people will go there anyway to expereience it on the big screen. That seems to be especially true with 3-D films which has developed into a very nice business for them. It's not that unusual to see a line of folks at the box office when 3-D is playing.

I love 3D films, and love my set-up at home.  Although, most films released today don't hold a candle to the classic 3D films of the 50s, there are some very good ones, and the depth added to all the films is enjoyable to me.

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Neighboring ALLEN PARK, MI is the only city hereabouts that still HAS a "dollar show". Well, $1.50 now, but not much of an increase considering how long it's been around.  Saw many a "first run" movie there over the years, It didn't turn into the "dollar show" until about the early '90's or so.  But, the place had been there since the '40's I think(architectually), and expanded into a "multiplex" in the late 1970's, while the theater in MY town of LINCOLN PARK, faded into obscurity, first trying to book rock'n'roll musical acts on weekends, then eventually going the way of porn, until the late '80's and finally calling it quits and closing down for good.

 

Right now, there's a developement group supposedly working to rennovate the building for rental lofts.

 

 

Sepiatone

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What I find really depressing is that over the last few years, it's been estimated that, in the U.S. alone, about 1500 theaters have been forced to close because the owners couldn't afford the $80,000 or more needed to convert to digital projection. Most of those were  neighborhood or  small town theaters.

 

The movie industry was quick to help the big circuits  pay for the conversion, but had no interest in giving some support to the little guys who they didn't feel were producing enough income for them. Of course, that's nothing new. The same kind of thing happened in the late 1920's when everybody had to convert to talkies.

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