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classicchildstarletsfan

JULY SCHEDULE IS UP!

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The link previously led me to a page of dates only with no program listings. It is now operational for me.

 

It looks to me to be a good month. It is a very interesting mix.

 

The evening of Thursday, July 9 has excellent guilty-pleasure sci-fi.

 

I am very happy to see: Ivan's Childhood (1962) is airing on Sunday, July 12. This is a very powerful movie. I urge all to watch it. Kanal (1957) which follows it is also very powerful and moving. I find it odd that these are followed by: The Mikado (1939). It is as if the programmers feel that viewers will need musical comedy for relief after watching these intense movies of war.

 

I am intrigued by the inclusion of: The Numberlys (2013) on Sunday, July 19.

 

I wonder if I have watched: Spione (1928) previously. The name and description seem familiar but I can not remember it specifically.

 

I believe that: In Heaven There is No Beer? (1984) will be interesting. I like very much some of the director's other works.

 

The tribute to William Powell on Wednesday, July 29 has many wonderful movies.

 

There are several movies which I do not recognize title or description. 

 

I believe it is overall a wonderful schedule!
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I am very happy to see: Ivan's Childhood (1962) is airing on Sunday, July 12. This is a very powerful movie. I urge all to watch it. Kanal (1957) which follows it is also very powerful and moving. I find it odd that these are followed by: The Mikado (1939). It is as if the programmers feel that viewers will need musical comedy for relief after watching these intense movies of war.

 

 

I am also very much looking forward to seeing IVAN'S CHILDHOOD. 

 

I've seen the version of THE MIKADO from 1939 that's airing on July 13.

If I recall in that version, "The Sun Whose Rays Are All Ablaze" (which is a big solo for Yum-Yum) is sung by Nanki-Poo 

I don't remember if Yum-Yum also sings it as well in the 1939 movie.

The actor playing Nanki-Poo is Kenny Baker, not the same Kenny Baker who's inside R2-D2 in the Star Wars movies. 

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I wonder if I have watched: Spione (1928) previously. The name and description seem familiar but I can not remember it specifically.
 
 

 

Spione is the German title of Fritz Lang's Spies. I quite like it (far more than Lang's Dr. Mabuse which I find slow and a bit dull). The last half hour of Spione is particularly exciting, quite melodramatic and fun. Rudolph Klein-Rogge's criminal mastermind characterization anticipates the villains to be found in the James Bond thrillers by a few decades.

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I've seen the version of THE MIKADO from 1939 that's airing on July 13.

If I recall in that version, "The Sun Whose Rays Are All Ablaze" (which is a big solo for Yum-Yum) is sung by Nanki-Poo 

I don't remember if Yum-Yum also sings it as well in the 1939 movie.

The actor playing Nanki-Poo is Kenny Baker, not the same Kenny Baker who's inside R2-D2 in the Star Wars movies. 

 

How strange for Nanki-Poo to sing "The Sun Whose Rays Are All Ablaze." 

 

I've never seen The Mikado movie from 1939 but I LOVE Topsy-Turvy, a movie from 1999 about the creation and first production of Gilbert and Sullivan's The Mikado.

Shirley Henderson (who was Moaning Myrtle in the Harry Potter movies) plays Lenora Braham, the first performer to play the role of Yum-Yum, and sings "The Sun Whose Rays Are All Ablaze" at the end of Topsy-Turvy

 

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Looks like TCM is giving some air time to Charles Laughton on July 1.  Could it be a coincidence that he was born July 1 (in 1899) and TCM is showing some of his movies?  Probably not.  And it looks like there's more Laughton movies, too, over the coming days.   

 

     My favorite kind of trivia . . . MORBID TRIVIA:  Charles Laughton died Dec. 15, 1962 at 63 and notable character actor Thomas Mitchell (who was born July 11, 1892) died Dec. 17, 1962 at 70. 

 

      I can't think offhand if the two appeared in any movies together.  

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Spione is the German title of Fritz Lang's Spies. I quite like it (far more than Lang's Dr. Mabuse which I find slow and a bit dull). The last half hour of Spione is particularly exciting, quite melodramatic and fun. Rudolph Klein-Rogge's criminal mastermind characterization anticipates the villains to be found in the James Bond thrillers by a few decades.

I agree.  SPIONE is an excellent fast moving film.  I've watched it several times.  Very innovative and fun.

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I'm pretty sure I saw BLUE VELVET on the July Schedule before, but now it's gone.

 

Every once in a while we are teased that something from TCM's forbidden list is finally gonna be shown - only to have it mysteriously withdrawn (probably when someone who has a lot of influence over the forbidden list becomes aware and blows a tube about it).

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Every once in a while we are teased that something from TCM's forbidden list is finally gonna be shown - only to have it mysteriously withdrawn (probably when someone who has a lot of influence over the forbidden list becomes aware and blows a tube about it).

 

There's a TCM article for BLUE VELVET which seems to indicate that it aired at least once on TCM in the past. 

 

It is disappointing that it was yanked from the July schedule.

ss3444402_-_photograph_of_kyle_maclachla

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There's a TCM article for BLUE VELVET which seems to indicate that it aired at least once on TCM in the past. 

 

It is on the list of previously shown movies that TopBilled has published in the Information forum.

 

So, maybe it's not a 'Zabriskie Point' case. I don't remember it actually being shown, but someone else might.

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There's a TCM article for BLUE VELVET which seems to indicate that it aired at least once on TCM in the past. 

 

It is disappointing that it was yanked from the July schedule.

ss3444402_-_photograph_of_kyle_maclachla

 

 

Yes, it has. I recorded it once.

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It is on the list of previously shown movies.

 

 

Maybe . . . wishful thinking here . . . Dean Stockwell is being given a much deserved day during this year's Summer Under The Stars and BLUE VELVET is being moved from July  to August for that reason.

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Maybe . . . wishful thinking here . . . Dean Stockwell is being given a much deserved day during this year's Summer Under The Stars and BLUE VELVET is being moved from July  to August for that reason.

 

Hope we get 'The Werewolf of Washington'.

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Maybe . . . wishful thinking here . . . Dean Stockwell is being given a much deserved day during this year's Summer Under The Stars and BLUE VELVET is being moved from July  to August for that reason.

I'd like to see Stockwell honored, too-- but they did a primetime spotlight on him, as well as others on Jane Withers and Virginia Weidler last year-- so I don't think any of them will be featured so quickly again. My guess is it will be Jackie Cooper.

 

The fact that SKIPPY, an expensive title from Universal, is on the July schedule suggests this to me. Usually TCM will get those costly Paramount films from Universal in a special deal that allows them to be broadcast two or three times. So that would be a perfect film to rebroadcast in August and use in primetime on Jackie Cooper's day for Summer Under the Stars.

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I missed THE ROMANCE OF ROSY RIDGE when it aired as part of Janet Leigh's Star of the Month tribute.

I'm glad to see it's on the July schedule.

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♠ THINGS ♠

 

a)  darkblue:  I've seen "Werewolf of Washington" (1973) several times.  I rather like it.  If TCM does air it would it be your first viewing should you watch?  There's a few hilariously absurd scenes, including one where Dean Stockwell is bowling with the President.  There's also a loudmouth lady in the film that I suspect was modeled on Martha Mitchell.  If you've not seen it before I think it's well worth 1 watch.  Many moons ago I rented it after reading Leonard Maltin's review which said something like "for the curious only".  Well, shucks, I was one of the curious. 

 

b )  TopBilled:  Why is SKIPPY an expensive movie to lease?  That's the kind of movie I'd have on just as background noise while doing something else as opposed to actually paying attention to it.  I'd only fork out the bare minimum of $funds$ to air a kids movie from the 1930s.  Yecch!  I remember watching some 'Our Gang' episodes when I was little and even then I could take them or leave them when my age was single-digits.  At 42, now I'd just leave them. 

 

     I can watch the old Scooby-Doo shows on the BOOMERANG Network that were produced in 1969, '70 and '73 and wax nostalgic as I saw them in the late '70s and early '80s in re-runs when I was growing up, but something like SKIPPY goes so far back I can't think of a 'target audience' for it in 2015?  If a person was 10 yrs old in 1931 they'd be pushing 94 now.  Who among us in this world of the still-living would be craving to see SKIPPY so that it would command a high price to 'rent' in 2015?  The cynic in me just can't see paying a premium to lease something so hopelessly outdated.   

 

c)  I hope TCM didn't fork out a $bundle$ to 'rent' those cut-rate "Bomba, the Jungle Boy" movies.  Those are so, uh, 'interesting' it makes walking to my mailbox seem like high adventure.  If I were 'Director Gorman' and I knew I was shooting the last of the series I'd make a few subtle script changes.  I'd have Bomba marry The Tooth Fairy and then promptly get ripped to pieces by a school of fishy predators (a hungry bunch of piranha, to be exact), his chimp turned into Headhunter Casserole (complete with squirrel salad and croutons) and Jilted Jungle Chick would ride off into the Sunset on a mutant alien giraffe.  ~AMEN~     

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i noticed a few things that appealed after doing a quick review and some searching. (it looks like the programmer(s) are in the same rut as there are many Easter Time Zone nite owl selections that follow.)

 

of course there's the Friday Spotlight "Summer of Darkness" Noir 24 hr Film Fests that carry over from June and there are five Fridays in July. of note is that each Friday (actually Saturday) in June concluded with one Neo-Noir movie. not so in July. Neo-Noir (post 1950's) gets three movies over two days. July 3 is The Long Goodbye (1973) at 230a edt, and Marlowe (1969) at 430a edt. on July 17 at 330a edt is Klute (1971). (no The Conversation (1974) this time around.)

 

other films of note on July 2 include Haxan (1922), 6a, and The Seventh Victim (1943) 145p.

 

you gotta see The Bribe (1949) July 3, 1130a. a big chunk of this movie was used in Steve Martin's Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid.

 

on Thur July 9 is Dead of Night (1945), 1130a. this gets shown each Oct. nice to see a showing some other time of the year.

 

Raw Deal (1948) is a tough Noir, but it's on late, 430a, Fri (remember, actually Sat) July 10.

 

these were mentioned before. TCM Imports has Ivan's Childhood (1961) and Kanal (1957) Sun, July 12 at 230a & 415a. the directors are important here; Ivan's Childhood is Andrei Tarkovsky, and Kanal is Andrezj Wajda. nice back to back.

 

and here comes Lizabeth Scott. Too Late for Tears (1949) Fri, July 17, 8p is part of a mini tribute to Scott during the 24 Hr Noir fest.

 

finally, Silent Sunday's showing of Victor Seastrom's The Phantom Carriage (1922), 1215a, July 26 has to be seen. i first heard about this flik when i was reading 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die.

 

immediately following Carriage is a TCM Import Cria Cuervos (1975), July 26, 215a. This stars (then child actor) Ana Torrent, who had appeared in The Spirit of the Beehive (1973). TCM is showing Beehive right after Cuervos.

 

there are others, but these stand out this month

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i noticed a few things that appealed after doing a quick review and some searching. (it looks like the programmer(s) are in the same rut as there are many Easter Time Zone nite owl selections that follow.)

 

of course there's the Friday Spotlight "Summer of Darkness" Noir 24 hr Film Fests that carry over from June and there are five Fridays in July. of note is that each Friday (actually Saturday) in June concluded with one Neo-Noir movie. not so in July. Neo-Noir (post 1950's) gets three movies over two days. July 3 is The Long Goodbye (1973) at 230a edt, and Marlowe (1969) at 430a edt. on July 17 at 330a edt is Klute (1971). (no The Conversation (1974) this time around.)

 

other films of note on July 2 include Haxan (1922), 6a, and The Seventh Victim (1943) 145p.

 

you gotta see The Bribe (1949) July 3, 1130a. a big chunk of this movie was used in Steve Martin's Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid.

 

on Thur July 9 is Dead of Night (1945), 1130a. this gets shown each Oct. nice to see a showing some other time of the year.

 

Raw Deal (1948) is a tough Noir, but it's on late, 430a, Fri (remember, actually Sat) July 10.

 

these were mentioned before. TCM Imports has Ivan's Childhood (1961) and Kanal (1957) Sun, July 12 at 230a & 415a. the directors are important here; Ivan's Childhood is Andrei Tarkovsky, and Kanal is Andrezj Wajda. nice back to back.

 

and here comes Lizabeth Scott. Too Late for Tears (1949) Fri, July 17, 8p is part of a mini tribute to Scott during the 24 Hr Noir fest.

 

finally, Silent Sunday's showing of Victor Seastrom's The Phantom Carriage (1922), 1215a, July 26 has to be seen. i first heard about this flik when i was reading 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die.

 

immediately following Carriage is a TCM Import Cria Cuervos (1975), July 26, 215a. This stars (then child actor) Ana Torrent, who had appeared in The Spirit of the Beehive (1973). TCM is showing Beehive right after Cuervos.

 

there are others, but these stand out this month

CRIA CUERVOS is a film.I've always wanted to see. It's title is the beginning of a saying my mom was fond of saying, "Cria cuervos y te sacan los ojos"......."raise crows and they'll pluck your eyes out". Very vivid, to say the least.

 

I will be on vacation when it airs, so I hope I remember to dvr it, and that the dvr has space. Glad it will be showing.

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