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Rodan - Why 1958?


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It was produced in Japan in 1956 and released that year as well.

 

The Americans, true to form, chopped 14 minutes from its 82 minute running time - added some hydrogen bomb footage to the beginning - dubbed it - changed the name from Radon to Rodan (as there was a detergent selling in the U.S. called 'Radon') and released the bastardized version in the summer of 1957.

 

So, why 1958, TCM?

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It was produced in Japan in 1956 and released that year as well.

 

The Americans, true to form, chopped 14 minutes from its 82 minute running time - added some hydrogen bomb footage to the beginning - dubbed it - changed the name from Radon to Rodan (as there was a detergent selling in the U.S. called 'Radon') and released the bastardized version in the summer of 1957.

 

So, why 1958, TCM?

love them Japanese miners-killing meganulons. :)

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It was produced in Japan in 1956 and released that year as well.

 

The Americans, true to form, chopped 14 minutes from its 82 minute running time - added some hydrogen bomb footage to the beginning - dubbed it - changed the name from Radon to Rodan (as there was a detergent selling in the U.S. called 'Radon') and released the bastardized version in the summer of 1957.

 

So, why 1958, TCM?

 

Interesting that the Americans would add the hydrogen bomb footage.   In another thread someone claimed that Americans didn't wish for the Japanese films to use the bomb as the reason 'strange Sci-Fi stuff' was happening in their country.   But maybe I misunderstood the point being made in that other thread. 

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I don't think they cut quite so much as 14 minutes.  And, frankly, I think that the American version is quite good.  Keye Luke's narration is superb.  The film wasn't truncated nearly as badly as GOJIRA.

 

The bad thing about the American version is its current print state.  It was originally printed in Technicolor (a friend has a 35mm dye-transfer print; incredible).  But I have no idea if the negative is faded or if B&W separations were made.  Today's prints are pretty poor, especially when compared to the Japanese original.

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Interesting that the Americans would add the hydrogen bomb footage.   In another thread someone claimed that Americans didn't wish for the Japanese films to use the bomb as the reason 'strange Sci-Fi stuff' was happening in their country.   But maybe I misunderstood the point being made in that other thread. 

 

 

The Americans, true to form, chopped 14 minutes from its 82 minute running time -

 

 

You make it sound like America is the only country that does that. Since the earliest days of movies, they've been recut in other countries. In some cases, probably this one, it was chopped down just so it would better fit on double-bills and probably more often  for censorship reasons.

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You make it sound like America is the only country that does that. Since the earliest days of movies, they've been recut in other countries. In some cases, probably this one, it was chopped down just so it would better fit on double-bills and probably more often  for censorship reasons.

 

Well America is the only country to have used the bomb on human beings.   Therefore in another thread someone claimed films would be cut (some would say censored),  removing scenes that implied the bomb as the cause of strange occurrences in Japan.   

 

So I found it odd that for the American release scenes about the bomb would be added to a film about sci-fi nuke type happenings in Japan.   

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Well America is the only country to have used the bomb on human beings.   Therefore in another thread someone claimed films would be cut (some would say censored),  removing scenes that implied the bomb as the cause of strange occurrences in Japan.   

 

So I found it odd that for the American release scenes about the bomb would be added to a film about sci-fi nuke type happenings in Japan.   

 

That was the case for 'Gojira' (1954). The change to 'Godzilla' for Americans took some of the nuke references out as it applied to Japan in particular.

 

However, 1950's b-movies began using "atomic radiation is causing lots of giant bugs and stuff" quite frequently - became a staple - and that was the thinking behind the 1957 American version of 'Rodan'. It was no longer an issue - particularly as the destruction in 'Rodan' is much less grim; much less morbid - not nearly so remindful of what 'Gojira' symbolized.

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Well America is the only country to have used the bomb on human beings.   Therefore in another thread someone claimed films would be cut (some would say censored),  removing scenes that implied the bomb as the cause of strange occurrences in Japan.   

 

So I found it odd that for the American release scenes about the bomb would be added to a film about sci-fi nuke type happenings in Japan.   

Well, since "the bomb" WAS dropped on Japan, I don't see movies that deal with odd results from the radiation in Japan as being out of line.  Funny thing----

 

In "real life" humans exposed to too much radiaton shrivel up and die.  INSECTS exposed to too much radiation, at least in movies, grow to enormous sizes and become menacingly strong!  :rolleyes:

 

 

Sepiatone

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