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MARXISM, BUGSISM, AND OTHER ISMS


scsu1975
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Due to the popular success of the "Road" films with Crosby and Hope at Paramount, Warner Brothers tried to counter that by teaming Dennis Morgan and Jack Carson in a couple of light hearted musical comedies. The results were only moderately successful.

 

In my opinion, the GREATEST comedy team to ever be produced by Warners Studio (actually from Termite Terrace shoved off into a corner within their confines), was this one:

 

rabbit-seasoning-255x1921_zpsugjm9m59.jp

 

I once created a thread on these boards, in fact, that compared the similarities between Bugs and Daffy to Bing and Bob.

 

3fd5938e-9dfb-48a0-a9f6-31af0d59a57a_zps

 

Don't look now, but Elmer might be getting confused.

 

This is a shot from Rabbit Fire!, the first of the Bugs and Daffy collaborations.

 

Now don't get me wrong, Bugs was a great solo performer, too. But I think that things really started to get even more juiced up during the '50s when he was teamed with the Daffster on a number of occasions.

 

Bugs was always the confident wise guy in these cartoons while Daffy, suffering from an inferiority complex (not to mention a strong tendency to slobber at times when he got really excited), sought to best him. Now we always knew who was going to come out on top at the end of these cartoon journeys but it was always so hilarious just taking those trips.

 

I'd like to add a special word of thanks, not only to the directors, artists and script writers of these 7 minute or so screen miracles, but, in particular, to the great Mel Blanc, voice maestro extraordinaire. Without Mel, how much different would our feelings about Bugs and Daffy be.

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Groucho in A NIGHT AT THE OPERA:

 

night-at-opera1_zpswzo4rkiq.jpg

 

"When a woman has dinner with me I expect her to look me in the face. That's the price she has to pay."

 

I once used this line when I took a girl out to dinner and it got a big laugh. She thought I was hilarious. (That's right, folks, I only steal from the best). 

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Due to the popular success of the "Road" films with Crosby and Hope at Paramount, Warner Brothers tried to counter that by teaming Dennis Morgan and Jack Carson in a couple of light hearted musical comedies. The results were only moderately successful.

 

In my opinion, the GREATEST comedy team to ever be produced by Warners Studio (actually from Termite Terrace shoved off into a corner within their confines), was this one:

 

rabbit-seasoning-255x1921_zpsugjm9m59.jp

 

I once created a thread on these boards, in fact, that compared the similarities between Bugs and Daffy to Bing and Bob.

 

3fd5938e-9dfb-48a0-a9f6-31af0d59a57a_zps

 

Don't look now, but Elmer might be getting confused.

 

This is a shot from Rabbit Fire!, the first of the Bugs and Daffy collaborations.

 

Now don't get me wrong, Bugs was a great solo performer, too. But I think that things really started to get even more juiced up during the '50s when he was teamed with the Daffster on a number of occasions.

 

Bugs was always the confident wise guy in these cartoons while Daffy, suffering from an inferiority complex (not to mention a strong tendency to slobber at times when he got really excited), sought to best him. Now we always knew who was going to come out on top at the end of these cartoon journeys but it was always so hilarious just taking those trips.

 

I'd like to add a special word of thanks, not only to the directors, artists and script writers of these 7 minute or so screen miracles, but, in particular, to the great Mel Blanc, voice maestro extraordinaire. Without Mel, how much different would our feelings about Bugs and Daffy be.

 

I love Bugs & Daffy as a team too. "Show Biz Bugs" & "Ali Baba Bunny" are my faves.

 

You gotta love the dialogue. In "Show Biz Bugs" Daffy tries to thwart Bugs' sawing a man in half trick. When Daffy realises he is actually in two pieces, he emerges from the magic box, his comment is, "Hmm... It's a good thing I've got Blue Cross". 

 

"Ali Baba Bunny" has Daffy screaming that he's rich, fabulously weathly, comfortably well off. "Down, down, down! Go, go, go! Mine, mine, mine! Ha ha ha ha ha ha!!!!" And, "Consequences, schmonsequences. As long as I'm rich."

 

Yes, you've got to love this teaming.

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I love Bugs & Daffy as a team too. "Show Biz Bugs" & "Ali Baba Bunny" are my faves.

 

You gotta love the dialogue. In "Show Biz Bugs" Daffy tries to thwart Bugs' sawing a man in half trick. When Daffy realises he is actually in two pieces, he emerges from the magic box, his comment is, "Hmm... It's a good thing I've got Blue Cross". 

 

"Ali Baba Bunny" has Daffy screaming that he's rich, fabulously weathly, comfortably well off. "Down, down, down! Go, go, go! Mine, mine, mine! Ha ha ha ha ha ha!!!!" And, "Consequences, schmonsequences. As long as I'm rich."

 

Yes, you've got to love this teaming.

Let's face it. As great as Bugs is, Daffy's greeeeedy little conniver steals Ali Baba Bunny from him.

 

As Daffy might say about his performance there, "This cartoon is mine, mine, mine!"

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Don't forget Max Steiner's music. The why, where, when, and how - all of those animated pictures have one helluva musical background.

 

There's a PBS radio station out my way that plays classical music on Saturday mornings and attributes some of it to Warner's cartoons.

 

And I've read that many children have learned classical music from the Warner's cartoons.

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Let's face it. As great as Bugs is, Daffy's greeeeedy little conniver steals Ali Baba Bunny from him.

 

 

EXCEPT for the "Would Hassan like all this treasure for his very own?"/"Eckity, eckity, ooh" genie dance/"It's yours" routine, anyway!

 

(...my reaction to Bugs' "It's yours" never fails to crack me up, and just like in the Mirror routine in DUCK SOUP when Groucho spins around but Harpo doesn't...and lord knows I've watched both of these innumerable times!) 

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Don't forget Max Steiner's music. The why, where, when, and how - all of those animated pictures have one helluva musical background.

 

There's a PBS radio station out my way that plays classical music on Saturday mornings and attributes some of it to Warner's cartoons.

 

And I've read that many children have learned classical music from the Warner's cartoons.

You're so right about the music in those cartoons, Janet, but I don't think it has much to do with Max Steiner. This is not my area of expertise (Ray Faiola, where are you?) but I believe that Carl Stalling was responsible for much of the music that we hear in Looney Tunes classics.

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You're so right about the music in those cartoons, Janet, but I don't think it has much to do with Max Steiner. This is not my area of expertise (Ray Faiola, where are you?) but I believe that Carl Stalling was responsible for much of the music that we hear in Looney Tunes classics.

 

Yep Tom. Carl Stalling was the man behind the music arrangements for the W-B shorts, though of course Stalling's music often consisted of a composite of melodies written by others and songs that were a hit with the public during the time.

 

I've noticed over the years that songs written by Harry Warren and Sammy Fain for the earlier made W-B musicals FOOTLIGHT PARADE and 42ND StREET such as "Shuffle Off to Buffalo" and "By a Waterfall" were often used by Stalling in his arrangements to coincide with the actions taking place in the cartoon shorts.

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Yep Tom. Carl Stalling was the man behind the music arrangements for the W-B shorts, though of course Stalling's music often consisted of a composite of melodies written by others and songs that were a hit with the public during the time.

You have to wonder, Dargo, old boy, just how many kids today are familiar with '40s musical hits strictly through hearing snatches of them in the Looney Tunes cartoons.

 

Isn't it ironic that Bugs and Daffy, among others, have greater familiarity (and probably future immortality) with many people today than do the vast majority of film stars of the Golden Era? Groucho is still pretty well remembered today but not nearly as much as Bugs.

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You have to wonder, Dargo, old boy, just how many kids today are familiar with '40s musical hits strictly through hearing snatches of them in the Looney Tunes cartoons.

 

Isn't it ironic that Bugs and Daffy, among others, have greater familiarity (and probably future immortality) with many people today than do the vast majority of film stars of the Golden Era? Groucho is still pretty well remembered today but not nearly as much as Bugs.

 

Good points, both.

 

In fact, I even have to admit that it has probably only been within the last twenty years or so that I discovered the facts I just added to my previous post about the sources of Stalling's arrangements.

 

(...in other words, until I had happened to catch the aforementioned W-B musicals on TCM, I didn't know that the music often used as Bugs exits a scene by dancing off was in fact "Shuffle Off to Buffalo" and that it was from 42ND STREET)

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You're so right about the music in those cartoons, Janet, but I don't think it has much to do with Max Steiner. This is not my area of expertise (Ray Faiola, where are you?) but I believe that Carl Stalling was responsible for much of the music that we hear in Looney Tunes classics.

 

Oh, you're right. Blame it on me for only 4 hours sleep. It was Carl Stalling and he borrowed much from Raymond Scott. Google The Raymond Scott Quintet - Powerhouse. You'll recognise the music.

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You have to wonder, Dargo, old boy, just how many kids today are familiar with '40s musical hits strictly through hearing snatches of them in the Looney Tunes cartoons.

 

Isn't it ironic that Bugs and Daffy, among others, have greater familiarity (and probably future immortality) with many people today than do the vast majority of film stars of the Golden Era? Groucho is still pretty well remembered today but not nearly as much as Bugs.

 

In my crazy workplace, the employees have a picture of Groucho on the door to the humidor. Not too many people have access to the humidor, but they recognize Groucho. I thought that was pretty cool when I was hired.

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Oh, you're right. Blame it on me for only 4 hours sleep. It was Carl Stalling and he borrowed much from Raymond Scott. Google The Raymond Scott Quintet - Powerhouse. You'll recognise the music.

Only four hours sleep? Somebody's watching too much Bugs Bunny. ;)

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Only four hours sleep? Somebody's watching too much Bugs Bunny. ;)

 

Ha ha ha. I was up all night watching disaster movies on TCM.

 

You know, that Hindenburg movie was kinda good. But Ben said it flopped on account of it being produced as a quickie disaster wanna be. I don't know about that, but the footage - what do you call it - the newsreel footage was pretty gruesome. That was one horrific time. Too much like 911.

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Ha ha ha. I was up all night watching disaster movies on TCM.

 

You know, that Hindenburg movie was kinda good. But Ben said it flopped on account of it being produced as a quickie disaster wanna be. I don't know about that, but the footage - what do you call it - the newsreel footage was pretty gruesome. That was one horrific time. Too much like 911.

 

Ben said it was produced as a quickie disaster wanna be?   I can't agree with that.   I wouldn't label the film as a standard disaster movie but more of a historical fictional drama.   The movie has high production values so I don't see where 'quickie' comes in.

 

Ok, the end result is only an O.K. movie but to me the focus of a standard disaster movie is mostly on what happens to people after the disaster.  In Hindenburg 95% of the focus is on events before the actual disaster.    

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Ben said it was produced as a quickie disaster wanna be?   I can't agree with that.   I wouldn't label the film as a standard disaster movie but more of a historical fictional drama.   The movie has high production values so I don't see where 'quickie' comes in.

 

Ok, the end result is only an O.K. movie but to me the focus of a standard disaster movie is mostly on what happens to people after the disaster.  In Hindenburg 95% of the focus is on events before the actual disaster.    

 

Ben said it came out the same time as Towering Inferno and Poseidon Adventure. Charter Cable had a less descriptive thing there last night. I

only know that the screen footage from the original disaster horrified me. I had a crummy night sleeping. Well, in 1975, I threw up when Daddy brought me to see Towering Infrerno.

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Ben said it was produced as a quickie disaster wanna be?   I can't agree with that.   I wouldn't label the film as a standard disaster movie but more of a historical fictional drama.   The movie has high production values so I don't see where 'quickie' comes in.

 

Ok, the end result is only an O.K. movie but to me the focus of a standard disaster movie is mostly on what happens to people after the disaster.  In Hindenburg 95% of the focus is on events before the actual disaster.    

 

Yep, pretty much, James.

 

(...or as I always called that flick: "(Air)ship of Fools"...and just about as "exciting"!)

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Your "mental diagnoses" here Tom reminds me of another of my favorite Bugs cartoons, and which is one of the few times in Bugs' career he doesn't end on top...1955's HARE BRUSH.

 

(...you remember..."I'm Elmer J. Fudd, millionaire. I own a mansion and a yacht.")

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h692VL8A848

 

I love when the bear is stamping down the ground and he becomes surprised when his feet come through the ground.

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I love when the bear is stamping down the ground and he becomes surprised when his feet come through the ground.

 

Yeah, the bear's reaction is funny, Janet. I agree. I also love how Friz Freleng the director introduces us to his short little cameo, with Bugs striking the match inside the cave and the bear towering over him.

 

(...it's like the bear is saying: "Yes?! And what do YOU want here?!)

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