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MARXISM, BUGSISM, AND OTHER ISMS


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then there's Herr Meets Hare ('45)

where Bugs first emits the line "shoulda taken that left toin at Albukoikee." :)

 

 

Yep, another of Bugs' great and memorable catchphrases alright, Mr.6!

 

Btw, I just looked up HERR MEETS HARE in Wikipedia, and found the following bit of info in it very amusing:

 

Like other American movies, Herr Meets Hare was available to German prisoners of war in the United States. The Germans did not like it; prisoner of war Hans Goebler said, "You saw Hermann Göring standing there full of decorations, then all of a sudden a rabbit showed up and took all the decorations off, and stuff like that. And we didn't care for that."

 

(...and who said the Germans are sometimes lacking in the sense of humor department, HUH?!)

 

LOL

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*Some wisenheimer responded with "Karl."  Jeez, I swear there is always somebody who tries to mess things up!

 

That is silly. Everyone knows he was not one of the brothers. He was their great-uncle who had no sense of humour and he went into politics at an early age.

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That is silly. Everyone knows he was not one of the brothers. He was their great-uncle who had no sense of humour and he went into politics at an early age.

 

Hey! When did THIS guy become a Canadian or a Brit, HUH?!

 

(...funny, I always thought Freddy here was a good ol' 'Merican boy who was taught to spell without that there superfluous "u"???!!!)

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Well, now that Bugs seems to have been killed off here... ;)

 

How about if we enliven the proceedings here again with a short routine from one of our other honorees?! And please note the lack of a particular superfluous letter in the word "honorees" here, folks. LOL

 

 

(...you CAN learn a lot from Lydia, ya know!) 

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And btw, Rich! THANKS so much for startin' this thread here!!!

 

(...who needs "polls" when ya got Groucho and Bugs around, RIGHT???!!!) ;)

 

LOL

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A bunch of us were yukkin' it up at work one night and spouting Bugs Bunnyisms. The 19 year old security gauard did not get it. Had no idee what we we going on about. Too bad. A wasted youth.

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And btw, Rich! THANKS so much for startin' this thread here!!!

 

(...who needs "polls" when ya got Groucho and Bugs around, RIGHT???!!!) ;)

 

LOL

Glad there has been interest in the thread, even if the intent has gone largely unnoticed :D

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The BOOMERANG Network (an offshoot of The Cartoon Network) has Looney Tunes cartoons on every day of the week.  On weekdays Bugs Bunny And Co. air on BOOMERANG at 12 noon Eastern time and then again at 2 AM.  On the weekends I'm not sure what time they air, but Bugsism is alive and well! 

 

      To hell with Karl Marx . . . I'd rather watch Sylvester chase Tweety.   

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Janet, I don't want to seem nosy, but what kind of work do you do? It sounds like a really fun place.

 

I work at a food and beverage distribution place. I work in the computer room running reports and printing paperwork for the warehouse and truck drivers.

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I think it's interesting to see the impact that different directors had on the Looney Tune cartoons, and, in particular, upon our hero Bugs when he worked with them. Probably the three best known Warners directors were Bob Clampett, Chuck Jones (probably the most famous of them) and Fritz Freleng.

 

Now Clampett cartoons are wild, with characters' limbs frequently stretching and expanding to almost the breaking point for hilarious effect. Clampett was a crazy man and his cartoons at Warners reflect that, being some of the most inspired pieces of lunacy captured at Termite Terrace.

 

A good illustration of the Clampett impact upon Bugs Bunny would be in TORTOISE WINS BY A HARE.

 

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Tortoise Wins By A Hare is one of the truly GREAT Bugs Bunny cartoons in which he will resort to almost any means to try to beat the slow speaking, slow moving tortoise in a race. Interestingly, this is also one of the few Bugs efforts in which our wise guy hero finally gets outwitted by his opponent (along with the unintention help of some gangster rabbits).

 

Another key Clampett classic with Bugs was THE BIG SNOOZE, a brilliant effort in which Elmer Fudd, tired of being outwitted by Bugs all the time, rips up his Warner contract and quits. ("But we're like Rabbit and Costello" Bugs pleads with him, trying to convince him to not walk out).

 

Elmer falls into a sleep of beautiful dreams and the cartoon becomes downright surreal when Bugs takes some sleeping pills (from a bottle saying "Take Dese and Doze") in order to cause mayhem by invading Elmer's peaceful dream. This is another wild classic, and it was truly a loss for Bugs Bunny (and the other Looney Tune characters) when Clampett left the studio.

 

But then there was Chuck Jones. Jones' cartoons were, for the most part, a contrast to Clampett's because Jones would increasingly place an emphasis upon characterization, often gaining a huge laugh by the most subtle of facial expressions on his character's faces.  

 

An illustration of a great early Bugs-Chuck Jones collaboration was Jones' spin on a familiar fairy tale, BUGS BUNNY AND THE THREE BEARS.

 

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This was a cartoon in which the characterizations of the three bears, grumpy, hot headed Papa, easy going Mama and dopey Junior played every bit as much a part in the hilarity (perhaps even more) than our hero Bugs, who invades their home.

 

Particularly brilliant was the voice characterization of Mama Bear by character actress (and later TV star) Bea Benaderet. Mama even gets extremely interested in our carrot chomping hero after he pays her a few compliments, as can be seen in this image:

 

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It was also Jones who was responsible for the brilliant subtlety of the characterizations in the earliest of Bugs' collaborations with Daffy Duck, such as Rabbit Fire and Duck Rabbit Duck.

 

Finally, Fritz Freleng was a long time Warners animation director who, to be honest, didn't make quite the same big impression upon me as did either Clampett or Jones when he worked with Bugs.

 

However, among their efforts together, was the memorable RHAPSODY RABBIT, in which master pianest Bugs is tormented by a mouse living in the piano while performing before an audience.

 

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Baseball Bugs, Racketeer Rabbit and Slick Hare (in which Bugs tangled with Humphrey Bogart) are among the other noteworthy Freleng efforts.

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Dargo's posting of LYDIA reminds me how the singing, dancing and plain ol' schmoozing factor was so uniformly good in these films.  While the Studio System certainly earned the knives in their back, they also churned out such a highly-skilled population of talent.  I love seeing our modern 'star celebrities' try their hand at singing-and-dancing, but so few of them can be joined by a roomful of zanies like the '30s and '40s offered. 

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(One other aside about Rich's excellent threads and titles... Churchill had been brought into Chamberlain's cabinet before Sep 1939 - the invasion by the Germans into Poland - and when that event occurred, she lamented "So now all the Isms are Wasms."  Winnie was the only one who could turn a phrase at that dinner table.)

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I think the Marx Brothers and Bugs Bunny are hysterical. I find them generally hilarious and always worthy of discussion.

 

I agree. 

 

I love the Marx Brothers because they're so ridiculous and so random.  I like that, unlike The Three Stooges (who, despite Moe being "the smart one," they're all bumbling), the Marx Brothers each have a distinct personality.  Even if they're antics are ridiculous, they're often clever.  Groucho's quips are hilarious. 

 

Bugs Bunny stars in 99% of my favorite Looney Tunes cartoons.  He's very much like all three Marx Brothers rolled into one.  One of my favorite Bugs Bunny episodes is one where he wakes up after a late night carrot juice bender.  He looks all hungover and haggard.  He staggers around for awhile, leaves his rabbit hole and ends up walking onto Marvin the Martian's spaceship.  

 

Another episode I love is this one where he's out of work and ends up sleeping on a park bench in Central Park with all the other out of work actors-- Bing Crosby, Jack Benny, Al Jolson and Eddie Cantor.  Elmer Fudd, looking for a partner for his vaudeville act, sees Bugs and says to him "Why are you hanging around these guys? They'll never amount to anything."

 

Another one I love is one where Bugs Bunny doesn't even appear until the end.  Daffy Duck is being terrorized by a sadistic animator who keeps erasing parts of his body and replacing them with crazy things like making his head part of a flower, flippers as feet and so on.  The animator also keeps erasing the backgrounds and putting Daffy in all these ridiculous situations.  Daffy Duck grows more and more irritated and threatens to walk out on his contract.  At the very end of the cartoon, it turns out that the animator is none other than Bugs Bunny!

 

Thanks for starting such a great topic.  It is a perfect conversation for the "General Discussion" boards :-)

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You have to wonder, Dargo, old boy, just how many kids today are familiar with '40s musical hits strictly through hearing snatches of them in the Looney Tunes cartoons.

 

Isn't it ironic that Bugs and Daffy, among others, have greater familiarity (and probably future immortality) with many people today than do the vast majority of film stars of the Golden Era? Groucho is still pretty well remembered today but not nearly as much as Bugs.

I'm not sure I qualify as a "kid" at 30 (almost 31, eek), but I've found that my love of old movies helps immensely in identifying all the caricatures and political humor that is present in Looney Tunes cartoons.  Someone who is unfamiliar with even who Edward G Robinson is, let alone be able to identify his caricature based on exaggerated facial features and voice, may not get as much from the cartoon.  I've noticed that Edward G. Robinson is parodied a lot in Looney Tunes cartoons as the typical gangster, just like Peter Lorre shows up a lot as the typical mad scientist type or creeper that has a scary castle or something.  Some of the Looney Tunes cartoons like Wile E. Coyote & The Roadrunner that don't use as many parodies of current events and people probably relate better to newer generations who are unfamiliar with studio era stars.

 

I've recognized a lot of 30s-40s standards in Looney Tunes cartoons, commercials, older and newer movies.  I've also noticed that episodes of I Love Lucy use a lot of turn of the century music, like "Sweet Adeline," "Shine on Harvest Moon," just to name a couple. When I went to Disneyland a couple years ago, I noticed that Main Street was playing an instrumental version of "Has Anybody Seen My Gal?" (which I also remember from I Love Lucy).  I started singing the song and my husband laughed at me and told me I was a nerd.  I doubt many other people even noticed the music, they probably figured Disneyland made the music for the area of the park. 

 

My co-worker (okay, he's like 50 something) and I will sometimes break out into the music from Michigan J. Frog's sole cartoon One Froggy Evening

 

"...I'm just wild about Harry! And Harry's wild about me!"

"...Please don't talk about me when I'm gone..."

 

Thank goodness for the Looney Tunes.  They're such fun.  I'm glad they started releasing them on Blu Ray.

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Tom wrote: Another key Clampett classic with Bugs was THE BIG SNOOZE, a brilliant effort in which Elmer Fudd, tired of being outwitted by Bugs all the time, rips up his Warner contract and quits. ("But we're like Rabbit and Costello" Bugs pleads with him, trying to convince him to not walk out).

 

Elmer falls into a sleep of beautiful dreams and the cartoon becomes downright surreal when Bugs takes some sleeping pills (from a bottle saying "Take Dese and Doze") in order to cause mayhem by invading Elmer's peaceful dream. This is another wild classic, and it was truly a loss for Bugs Bunny (and the other Looney Tune characters) when Clampett left the studio.

 

Good observation here, Tom. Yes, Clampett's sense of the surreal and which did probably differentiate him from his fellow W-B cartoon directors can be seen as far back as 1938 and in his VERY surrealistic "Porky in Wackyland" short. 

 

I remember seeing this short for the first time on the tube at about 6 or 7 years of age in the late '50s, and its sheer weirdness stuck with me for years.

 

(...saaaay....ya think THIS could maybe explain my....ummm....never mind) 

 

;)

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Good observation here, Tom. Yes, Clampett's sense of the surreal and which did probably differentiate him from his fellow W-B cartoon directors can be seen as far back as 1938 and in his VERY surrealistic "Porky in Wackyland" short. 

 

I remember seeing this short for the first time on the tube at about 6 or 7 years of age in the late '50s, and its sheer weirdness stuck with me for years.

 

(...saaaay....ya think THIS could maybe explain my....ummm....never mind) 

 

;)

Clampett also introduced a new character, Beaky Buzzard, in a Bugs effort, BUGS BUNNY GETS THE BOID.

 

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Actually, he's never referred to as "Beaky" in this short, but, instead, as "Killer" by his very Jewish sounded momma. But Beaky, or Killer, or whatever his name was, appeared, unfortunately, in very few cartoons, the next one being THE BASHFUL BUZZARD, also directed by Clampett. I loved Beaky's slow witted character (it almost seemed mean for a sharp thinker like Bugs to out wit him).

 

But Clampett left Warners not long after The Bashful Buzzard. Sadly, Kent Rogers, who supplied that marvelous dumb sounding voice for Beaky (so much of his personality was in that voice) was killed in a flight training accident in 1944. According to Wiki, this happened during the making of The Bashful Buzzard so Stan Freberg came in to finish the cartoon doing Beaky's voice.

 

Beaky would be revived in a Bob McKimson effort, Strife With Father. He would be revived on the rare occasion afterwards but I think it's his first two efforts with Clampett for which he's best remembered.

 

As a kid, I spent a lot of wasted youth running around doing impersonations of Beaky Buzzard and Elmer Fudd to anyone that would listen. I sure did have a lot of fun doing them, though.

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I'm not sure I qualify as a "kid" at 30 (almost 31, eek), but I've found that my love of old movies helps immensely in identifying all the caricatures and political humor that is present in Looney Tunes cartoons.  Someone who is unfamiliar with even who Edward G Robinson is, let alone be able to identify his caricature based on exaggerated facial features and voice, may not get as much from the cartoon.  I've noticed that Edward G. Robinson is parodied a lot in Looney Tunes cartoons as the typical gangster, just like Peter Lorre shows up a lot as the typical mad scientist type or creeper that has a scary castle or something. 

 

speedracer, I also love the caricatures of the "old" movie stars in the Looney Tunes/Merry Melodies cartoons.

Of course, they were current movie stars when the cartoons were made.

 

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Can anyone identify all of the stars being caricatured?

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speedracer, I also love the caricatures of the "old" movie stars in the Looney Tunes/Merry Melodies cartoons.

Of course, they were current movie stars when the cartoons were made.

 

 

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Can anyone identify all of the stars being caricatured?

Yes, I can identify all except this one (I'll let someone else have the fun of naming them).

 

By the way, if memory serves me correctly, that "damsel" hiding behind the fan with Gable turns out to be Groucho Marx.

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