Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

What color is that?


Kid Dabb
 Share

Recommended Posts

Haven't you wondered this as you're watching a favorite b&w film?

 

Every time I see Myrna Loy's candy-striped evening gown in The Thin Man (1934), I ask myself that question. As I am watching Stella Dallas at this moment, I also wonder what kind of wild color schemes Stella has incorporated into her clothing - they look splashy in b&w.

image.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Myrna was usually very well dressed but this dress is down right ugly. I think she wore this in Penthouse, before she was Nora Charles.

 

That "red" dress that Bette Davis wore in Jezebel was actually black if I'm remembering correctly.

 

ETA: oops I see now where you said she wore it in The Thin Man. She wore a similar dress in Penthouse but it had a big bow across the bust area.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Myrna was usually very well dressed but this dress is down right ugly. I think she wore this in Penthouse, before she was Nora Charles.

 

...

 

ETA: oops I see now where you said she wore it in The Thin Man. She wore a similar dress in Penthouse but it had a big bow across the bust area.

Yeah. Looks a little frumpy in this pic - not the clearest photo.

 

I think we see it mostly from the waist up, so it's not too bad. Some time back, here on these boards, someone mentioned this dress was green striped - I always imagined it red.. don't know why. It wasn't to match her hair because I had not found out she was a redhead until many years after seeing this film for the first time. I think that poster mentioned the color was revealed in a biography - not sure if it was Myrna's or another actor's.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Some years ago, I had thought of something I hadn't realized before:
 
We, the audience, see these films in b&w and have to imagine the colors, while (nearly) everyone involved in the making of them sees them in their true colors. Except for their personal prints, going to a screening, DVDs, or watching them on tv/cable, they may not see these films in b&w at all - ever.
 
My whole perception of many b&w films is based in great part on the fact they are b&w, as it adds to the feeling and atmosphere. When I see still color shots of b&w films, I just can't imagine that film having been made in Technicolor (for example).
 
The biggest shock I received was seeing a color still of Greer Garson for the first time. I had never imagined her hair to be red - I'm still not used to it. I want my Greer in b&w.
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Yeah. Looks a little frumpy in this pic - not the clearest photo.

 

I think we see it mostly from the waist up, so it's not too bad. Some time back, here on these boards, someone mentioned this dress was green striped - I always imagined it red.. don't know why. It wasn't to match her hair because I had not found out she was a redhead until many years after seeing this film for the first time. I think that poster mentioned the color was revealed in a biography - not sure if it was Myrna's or another actor's.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Some years ago, I had thought of something I hadn't realized before:
 
We, the audience, see these films in b&w and have to imagine the colors, while (nearly) everyone involved in the making of them sees them in their true colors. Except for their personal prints, going to a screening, DVDs, or watching them on tv/cable, they may not see these films in b&w at all - ever.
 
My whole perception of many b&w films is based in great part on the fact they are b&w, as it adds to the feeling and atmosphere. When I see still color shots of b&w films, I just can't imagine that film having been made in Technicolor (for example).
 
The biggest shock I received was seeing a color still of Greer Garson for the first time. I had never imagined her hair to be red - I'm still not used to it. I want my Greer in b&w.

 

I always pictured the dress being red striped too.  Not a bright, vibrant red, but a more muted tone. 

 

I didn't realize Loy was a redhead! I pictured her with light brown hair.

 

The dress is definitely wild, but completely in line with the wild fashions of the 1930s, but what I love about the dress is how it moves when she walks around the party tending to her guests.  I bet it was a very comfortable dress to wear.  Light with flowy fabric.   

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I always pictured the dress being red striped too.  Not a bright, vibrant red, but a more muted tone. 

 

I didn't realize Loy was a redhead! I pictured her with light brown hair.

 

The dress is definitely wild, but completely in line with the wild fashions of the 1930s, but what I love about the dress is how it moves when she walks around the party tending to her guests.  I bet it was a very comfortable dress to wear.  Light with flowy fabric.   

Ya know the hard candies that have that red ribbon color running through them.. mostly found around the holidays.. that's the color red I imagined. With the rest being a sort of pearlescent white - like the candy.

 

Here.. this stuff.

6502_Detail.jpg

 

Now that you know Myrna's a red head, there's no going back.. you can't unimagine.

:P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think a lot times we'd be surprised at what the true color actually was. Certain colors photographed better in black & white and were chosen more for how the camera saw it and not how the audience would picture it in their minds. 

 

Sometimes, if the studio needed to have color photos made for publicity purposes, two sets of costumes would be made, one for black and white and the other for color.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think a lot times we'd be surprised at what the true color actually was. Certain colors photographed better in black & white and were chosen more for how the camera saw it and not how the audience would picture it in their minds. 

 

Sometimes, if the studio needed to have color photos made for publicity purposes, two sets of costumes would be made, one for black and white and the other for color.

I'm glad you brought that up. It would be interesting to see those true colors which were used specifically for the camera.

 

I'll bet some were awful.

:blink:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm glad you brought that up. It would be interesting to see those true colors which were used specifically for the camera.

 

I'll bet some were awful.

:blink:

I can't think of specifics, but I remember a long time ago seeing an article someplace that showed examples and some where pretty garish. I do remember that red was often substituted for black because under certain lighting conditions it looked better on film than real black did.

 

Can you just picture Bing Crosby, as Father O'Mally, in GOING MY WAY making his parish rounds in a bright red suit? :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Haven't you wondered this as you're watching a favorite b&w film?

 

Every time I see Myrna Loy's candy-striped evening gown in The Thin Man (1934), I ask myself that question. As I am watching Stella Dallas at this moment, I also wonder what kind of wild color schemes Stella has incorporated into her clothing - they look splashy in b&w.

image.jpg

 

 

Kid, we had a thread about this dress several years ago, and someone turned up a color photo, from a movie poster I think, that showed the color of the dark stripes to be a pale lime green, with white stripes.

 

1935gallahersfff.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Without an actual color still to verify it, I wouldn't take the color on that poster at face value. Most of the time they were made from black and white photos and then colored by an artist. Colors were often chosen to set  the specific mood the poster was designed to give off, like bright and happy or dark and moody.

 

Unless it was  a specific uniform or something that was very recognizable, I don't think there was  that much of an effort to accurately match what the actor wore.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

AH, yes...PUCE! You can NEVER go wrong with Puce, ya know.

 

In fact, take a tip from me here! Whenever ya see some old black and white flick and the lady(okay, and sometimes Jack Benny) is wearin' some dress, always just think of its color as PUCE.

 

(...you have no Idea how much time and energy this has saved me over the years)

 

;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, with my job I often have only a b&w photo as a guide for reproducing colors. All you can really tell is hue (the amount of white added to a color) and saturation (the amount of pure color to the mix)

 

That dress's hue & saturation does not look lime green to me, it's too "dark". The straps, empire tie & ruffles seem to be a different hue than the stripes on the body of the dress.

 

And the word is "flow-ING" I don't know where this new term "flow-y" comes from, but it's not a real word.

 

And I can definitely discern a red head from honey brown hair in a b&w movie. Greer is definitely a red head, but a lighter more blonde red than mahogany haired Maureen O'Hara. And Myrna is a less fiery red head, more of an auburn honey red head, at least to my eyes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, with my job I often have only a b&w photo as a guide for reproducing colors. All you can really tell is hue (the amount of white added to a color) and saturation (the amount of pure color to the mix)

 

Tiki, you are not a film colourizer are you?  HA!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I purchased my BEWITCHED DVD sets, I opted for Season 1 and 2 in the original black-and-white rather than the colorized versions that were also available.

Those are my favorite episodes. I believe Elizabeth Montgomery is beautiful in these. Her screen image was changed when they went to color, and it was not much to my liking. She had a softer, more natural appearance in the b&w episodes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Those are my favorite episodes. I believe Elizabeth Montgomery is beautiful in these. Her screen image was changed when they went to color, and it was not much to my liking. She had a softer, more natural appearance in the b&w episodes.

 

 I do like the episodes that were filmed in color but I don't like the colorized versions of the black and white episodes.

 

I agree that Elizabeth Montgomery is especially beautiful in the black and white episodes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I also purchased my Bewitched DVDs in black and white.  That's how the show was originally made and that's what I want.  When they moved to color in season 5 or 6 (whichever it was) then those episodes are fine.  I completely agree with Holden and Kid Dabb's assessment on Bewitched in black and white vs color.  I agree that Elizabeth Montgomery looked prettier in the black and white.  I think the color somehow made her look older.  While she was still a very pretty woman, the black and white gave her a nicer look.

 

I Dream of Jeannie on the other hand... needs color.  That show is so colorful that it's hard to watch the first season which is in black and white.  The effects needed for 'Jeannie' (Jeannie's pink smoke, for example) and the costuming looks so much better in color.

 

I liked The Andy Griffith Show in black and white better than when it was in color.  'Andy Griffith' was a very quaint show and the black and white was a perfect fit.  When it moved to color, it just didn't work as well for me--though many of the color episodes (albeit, Barney-less, sigh) were still very funny.

 

Recently CBS has become obsessed with releasing 1-2 colorized episodes of I Love Lucy as little mini specials.  As someone who is absolutely obsessed with this show and love everything about it, I have mixed feelings about this.  I am typically someone who wants to see old television shows and films uncut and in their original format.  I want to see the program/movie how it was originally intended.  I love that my I Love Lucy DVDs even have some of the original commercials included.  In addition to painstakingly restoring the series from the original film, CBS also restored some additional footage that has been missing since when the show was originally aired.  I love that I can see my favorite show of all time in it's original form and not chopped up by the networks to fit in more dumb car insurance commercials...

 

(sorry I went off on a tangent there)...

 

Anyway, this Sunday at 8:00pm CBS is airing two more episodes that they have colorized (previous episodes included "The Christmas Show," "Lucy's Italian Movie," and "Job Switching").  This time, they've colorized "L.A. at Last!" with special guest star William Holden and "Lucy and Superman" with special guest star George Reeves as Superman.  I absolutely love the Holden episode, it is hilarious.  I am mixed on whether or not I like what CBS is doing: on one hand, I like that they're reintroducing a 60+ year old show to a new audience to hopefully grow the already large fanbase... but on the other hand, I don't know if I like the idea of the show being colorized.  I don't know if CBS thinks nobody will watch a black and white show or perhaps they think it's a fun idea to colorize such a famous black and white show and is treating this as a novelty.  I think the colorization is very well done.  For once, they didn't make Lucy's hair orange and give Ricky this insanely dark skin color. 

 

I love to watch the I Love Lucy episodes and try to imagine what color Lucy's clothes are.  I'm always excited to find real color photographs taken on the I Love Lucy set, or seeing photos of the actual clothing or something and being able to see definitive proof as to what color different outfits were.  I saw Lucy's classic polka dot dress at a museum in Hollywood--for those who are curious, it's navy blue with white polka dots.  I heard that much of the set and costumes were in various shades of grey because that showed up best on the film.  Even the cast members wore grey tinted makeup (with the exception of Desi Arnaz I imagine).  I'd have to think that in person, they probably didn't look as good as they did in black and white.  Lol. 

 

I'll still watch the special anyway... but I would never replace my black and white I Love Lucy episodes with colorized ones.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I noticed two Kurosawa films are showing overnight Throne of Blood is on at 2am EDT and Yojimbo is on at 4 am EDT. I haven't see the former but the latter is very good. I would imagine the other is as well. Both star Toshiro Mifune always worth watching.

 

Tomorrow afternoon is Three Godfathers with John Wayne, Harry Caray Jr. and Pedro Armendariz. It's one of Wayne's best performances and is well directed by John Ford.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

.... I don't know if CBS thinks nobody will watch a black and white show....

 

 

Yep Speedy, my guess is that THAT'S exactly the reason for this.

 

(...'cause ya know, there are SO many people under 40 years of age now days where those old B&W movies and TV shows will "hurt their eyes"!!!) ;) 

 

LOL

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

I love to watch the I Love Lucy episodes and try to imagine what color Lucy's clothes are.  I'm always excited to find real color photographs taken on the I Love Lucy set, or seeing photos of the actual clothing or something and being able to see definitive proof as to what color different outfits were.  I saw Lucy's classic polka dot dress at a museum in Hollywood--for those who are curious, it's navy blue with white polka dots.  I heard that much of the set and costumes were in various shades of grey because that showed up best on the film.  Even the cast members wore grey tinted makeup (with the exception of Desi Arnaz I imagine).  I'd have to think that in person, they probably didn't look as good as they did in black and white.  Lol. 

 

I'll still watch the special anyway... but I would never replace my black and white I Love Lucy episodes with colorized ones.

 

On THE LUCY SHOW Season 2 DVD sets, you have the option of watching the shows in color or in black-and-white.

The episodes were filmed in color, per Lucille Ball's request, but most TV viewers at the time they were originally aired saw them on black-and-white TV sets.

I never saw the shows when they originally aired so I like the color episodes since they were filmed in color.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On THE LUCY SHOW Season 2 DVD sets, you have the option of watching the shows in color or in black-and-white.

The episodes were filmed in color, per Lucille Ball's request, but most TV viewers at the time they were originally aired saw them on black-and-white TV sets.

I never saw the shows when they originally aired so I like the color episodes since they were filmed in color.  

 

I think they have been colorized electronically. I don't think they were filmed in color. Too expensive, and no one had any color TVs in 1952

 

Here are some color home movies, shot from behind the black and white film cameras.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think they have been colorized electronically. I don't think they were filmed in color. Too expensive, and no one had any color TVs in 1952

 

Here are some color home movies, shot from behind the black and white film cameras.

 

 

I love Lucy was black and white the entire run. There is one episode that was filmed in color as an experiment. It's a special feature on the I love Lucy DVD boxed set. The video that was posted here is also a special feature. The video is someone's home video.

 

The Lucy Show, which I believe started in 1962, filmed the first season in black and white and the remaining 5 seasons in color.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm watching Dark Shadows on Decades;  a new station that is shows entire T.V. shows,  start to finish,  24 \ 7,  one show after the other (before this there was The Man from Uncle,  Kung Fu,  and Route 66 etc..).   

 

Dark Shadows started out in B&W and than moved to color (I believe in year 2).    What was strange is that they showed an episode in color (which I assume was the first one for season 2), but then went back to B&W for one episode,  with all the ones after this in color.    The episodes were shown in the correct order (this is easy to determine in a soap like DS),  since the start of each episode begins with the ending of the last.    Therefore I assume this one episode is in B&W because part of it were filmed prior to the entire series changing to color.    They also changed actors a lot.   They mention these changes by saying that a character is played by a certain actor at the start (since the credits are always at the end).          

 

Joan Bennett is the biggest star of the show.    But even she messes up her lines.   The show was clearly made on the cheap since they didn't redo scenes were the actors make mistakes (and there are at least 3 or so each episode).

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...