Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Happy Mother's Day


HoldenIsHere
 Share

Recommended Posts

But no mother-son relationship in the movies was ever quite as heartwarming as this one:

 

white-heat-james-cagney-margaret-wycherl

 

Ma, did you remember to send my check to the March of Dimes drive?

 

 

She gives her best performance as Gary Cooper's mother:

13855099_gal.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And then there are those wicked film mothers who expressed themselves in more socially acceptable ways:

 

Gladys+1.png

 

Gladys Cooper as Mrs. Vale in Now, Voyager

 

Yes, she was truly a wicked mother in that movie. 

I know it's a work of fiction but that character really makes me angry.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, she was truly a wicked mother in that movie. 

I know it's a work of fiction but that character really makes me angry.

 

Bette Davis' mother in Now Voyager made me mad as well.  She continually browbeats her daughter which has led to her complete lack of self-confidence.  She's punishing her because Davis was an unwanted child. Even when Davis returns, a confident, happy woman, her mother continues to treat her like garbage.  I was actually glad when she dies in the film.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

I couldn't resist . . .

Lol.  Well there was that one episode where Bobby thought that Carol was the wicked stepmother because she asked him to clean out the fireplace and packed his bags, ready to leave home.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some of the mothers I love are the really crabby ones from the 30s and 40s movies--they always seem to be at odds with their son in laws. 

 

My favorite is Nora Charles' aunt Katharine (a mother figure to Nora) in the second Thin Man movie.  She is hilarious and treats Nick Charles like he's completely unfit to be part of their family.

 

In Love Crazy, Myrna Loy's mother shows up on her and her husband William Powell's anniversary and manages to send Loy out on an errand, forcing Powell to spend the evening with his cranky mother in law.  She basically convinces Loy that Powell is cheating on her, which leads to the action in the film.

 

In Footsteps in the Dark, Errol Flynn's mother in law constantly acts like he's always up to no good and is very conscientious of their social image.  Flynn constantly tries to charm her by telling her she looks like a young girl, or that he likes her new dress or whatever, distracting her from disapproving of him. 

 

I love the crabby elderly mothers, grandmothers and aunts that seem to be present in films from the 1930s-1940s.  It seems by the 1950s, with the films shifting toward more serious/dramatic topics, that the hilarious cranky mother type went away. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

speedracer5 said:

I love the crabby elderly mothers, grandmothers and aunts that seem to be present in films from the 1930s-1940s.  It seems by the 1950s, with the films shifting toward more serious/dramatic topics, that the hilarious cranky mother type went away. 

 

 

 

Yeah, you might be right about that, Speedy. OR, they could have all just jumped to television about that time.

 

One of recent favorites being Doris Roberts... 

marie-barone.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, you might be right about that, Speedy. OR, they could have all just jumped to television about that time.

 

One of recent favorites being Doris Roberts... 

marie-barone.jpg

Doris Roberts and Peter Boyle are the only good things about Everybody Loves Raymond.  I cannot stand the wife in that show.  She is so irritating.  I especially like Roberts because she's mean to Raymond's wife.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some of the mothers I love are the really crabby ones from the 30s and 40s movies--they always seem to be at odds with their  

I love the crabby elderly mothers, grandmothers and aunts that seem to be present in films from the 1930s-1940s.  It seems by the 1950s, with the films shifting toward more serious/dramatic topics, that the hilarious cranky mother type went away. 

They're far more fun than the kindly ones, I agree!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bette Davis' mother in Now Voyager made me mad as well.  She continually browbeats her daughter which has led to her complete lack of self-confidence.  She's punishing her because Davis was an unwanted child. Even when Davis returns, a confident, happy woman, her mother continues to treat her like garbage.  I was actually glad when she dies in the film.

That was Gladys Cooper, who plays a similar mother to Deborah Kerr in SEPARATE TABLES

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I never watched Everybody Loves Raymond while it ran. I had never seen it at all (I watch virtually no regular TV) until about 3-4 years ago. Seeing it I was struck by how old-fashioned it was -- both in style as well as content: the wife is a stay-at-home mom who worries about what the mother-in-law will think of her cooking! How man times did we see that on Hazel?

 

ELR did have one of my all time favorite lines. Sportswriter Ray reacts when someone tells he should be more ambitious: "I don't want to write the Great American Novel... I don't even want to read the Great American Novel."

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I never watched Everybody Loves Raymond while it ran. I had never seen it at all (I watch virtually no regular TV) until about 3-4 years ago. Seeing it I was struck by how old-fashioned it was -- both in style as well as content: the wife is a stay-at-home mom who worries about what the mother-in-law will think of her cooking! How man times did we see that on Hazel?

 

ELR did have one of my all time favorite lines. Sportswriter Ray reacts when someone tells he should be more ambitious: "I don't want to write the Great American Novel... I don't even want to read the Great American Novel."

 

Well ELR is not really old-fashion as it relates to Raymond.    Raymond is weak,  he is a wimp,  he is a complete and total mommies boy.    Therefore he isn't close to the type of fathers and husbands like we see in Father Knows Best,  Leave it to Beaver,  the Donny Reed Show,  or even Ozzie in Ozzie and Harriet.     His brother Robert is even worst.  

 

ELR was part of the trend where the leading men in Sit-Coms are not very strong characters but clueless weak men.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well ELR is not really old-fashion as it relates to Raymond.    Raymond is weak,  he is a wimp,  he is a complete and total mommies boy.    Therefore he isn't close to the type of fathers and husbands like we see in Father Knows Best,  Leave it to Beaver,  the Donny Reed Show,  or even Ozzie in Ozzie and Harriet.     His brother Robert is even worst.  

 

ELR was part of the trend where the leading men in Sit-Coms are not very strong characters but clueless weak men.

 

We remember FKB, LITB, DRS, but there was also a movement where fathers were portrayed as hapless. Make Room For Daddy qualifies here to a degree, although less b/c of the father himself than his kids invariably getting the best of him, and topping him with brilliant bon mots (Groucho in one of his books bemoaned this convention of half-pints "letting loose with one-liners that would do Noel Coward proud"). I would include The Life of Riley here as well. If you've read about television in the 1950s one of the recurring complaints from social critics was that sitcoms made fathers look silly and incompetent (the subtext being it was some kind of attack on the nuclear family).

 

Raymond can be seen as a throwback to MRFD. The incompetent father has been a fixture of US sitcoms from the beginning. In fact the ones with competent fathers might even be classified as something else, since they were invariably much more serious than the silly father shows.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Didn't she also play Henry Higgins's mother in MY FAIR LADY?

I always thought Rex Harrison looked too old to be her son or maybe she looked too young.

I believe she did.  I think she's also Judy Garland's aunt (but a mother type) or something like that in The Pirate.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Raymond can be seen as a throwback to MRFD. The incompetent father has been a fixture of US sitcoms from the beginning. In fact the ones with competent fathers might even be classified as something else, since they were invariably much more serious than the silly father shows.

 

I think the comedic shows featuring competent fathers usually has him playing the straight man while all the craziness unfolds around him.  The comedy comes from not only the situations themselves, but the father's reaction to them. 

 

Some shows featuring competent fathers:

 

The Andy Griffith Show, Andy Taylor

The Brady Bunch, Mike Brady

Happy Days, Howard Cunningham

I Love Lucy, Ricky Ricardo

 

...just to name a few.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I believe she did.  I think she's also Judy Garland's aunt (but a mother type) or something like that in The Pirate.

 

I think she (Gladys Cooper) was also Irene Dunne's mother-in-law in a movie that aired on TCM recently--- the one where Irene Dunne plays an American married to a British man.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...